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Killington, Vermont votes to Secede from the State

Vermont Killington-VT 2004

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#1 D'Monix

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Posted 03 March 2004 - 12:59 PM

Of course, they'd be an enclave of NH in the middle of Vermont!

from CNN.com

Quote

KILLINGTON, Vermont (AP) -- Voting with a thunderous "aye," residents endorsed a plan Tuesday for this ski resort town to secede from Vermont and become a part of New Hampshire instead.

The overwhelming voice vote opened the next chapter in what could be a long and costly push to join New Hampshire, 25 miles to the east.

Ultimately, the vote could prove to be only symbolic. State lawmakers in New Hampshire and Vermont will have the final say. And Vermont legislators said secession will probably be voted down.

Town officials said about two-thirds of the 200 to 300 people who attended the town meeting supported secession.

The main source of discontent is Vermont's new system of financing education, adopted in 1997 on orders from the state Supreme Court. It dramatically increased property taxes in wealthy communities like Killington.

Secession activists say Killington's restaurants, inns and other businesses send $20 million a year to Montpelier in sales, room and meal taxes, while the state returns just $1 million in municipal and education aid to the town of roughly 1,000 residents.

"The state is treating us like a cash-cow," said David Lewis, town manager.

Town officials will now draft a petition to present to New Hampshire Gov. Craig Benson and the state's Legislature. Lewis said town officials want New Hampshire's approval before approaching Vermont's lawmakers.


#2 Godeskian

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Posted 03 March 2004 - 01:31 PM

I may simply be an ignorant european but 'Can they do that?

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#3 Rov Judicata

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Posted 03 March 2004 - 01:33 PM

I can't think of a precedent, but why not? Michigan is in two parts, so there's no requirement that states be contiguous....
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#4 Banapis

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Posted 03 March 2004 - 02:25 PM

Javert Rovinski, on Mar 3 2004, 06:31 PM, said:

Michigan is in two parts, so there's no requirement that states be contiguous....

And there's an interesting story behind that. ;)  Michigan's geography stems from the "Toledo War" that began in 1835 when 22 year old Michigan Territorial Governor Stevens T. Mason rallied the militia and marched the troops south to seize back the "Toledo strip." The strip was a piece of land the thieving Ohioans had wrongfully stolen from the Michigan Territory in clear violation of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.  

Ohio, though, continued to work Washington to effectuate their theft with such skilful skullduggery that John Quincy Adams was moved to comment, "Never in the course of my life have I known a controversy of which all the right so clearly on one side and all the power so overwhelmingly on the other."

Eventually, Congress proposed that Michigan be given the Upper Peninsula as compensation for the Ohio land grab.  In order to ratify Congress' proposed compromise, delegates were sent to a special convention that was held at Ann Arbor, MI in 1836.

This lingering cultural memory, of course, has nothing whatsoever to do with the hype each November when a certain university located in Ann Arbor, MI fields a football team to do battle with Buckeye scoundrels hailing from the Capital of Ohio. ;)

Banapis

#5 CJ AEGIS

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Posted 03 March 2004 - 03:22 PM

Quote

U.S. Constitution:Article IV: Section 3. New states may be admitted by the Congress into this union; but no new states shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of the states concerned as well as of the Congress.

The relevant part of the Constitution in regard to this would be above.  So as Vermont, New Hampshire, and Congress all agreed to it then it would be legal.  Vermont is never going to agree to it.  I think they are still in a tiffy over the fact that they were once part of NYS.  But this idea of splitting states is nothing new.  There has been a lot of talk in NYS about the Upstate breaking away from downstate NYC but I donít think it would ever happen anytime soon at least.
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#6 HubcapDave

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Posted 03 March 2004 - 06:51 PM

CJ AEGIS, on Mar 3 2004, 01:20 PM, said:

Quote

U.S. Constitution:Article IV: Section 3. New states may be admitted by the Congress into this union; but no new states shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of the states concerned as well as of the Congress.


And thus the State of Franklin died a quiet death.

#7 Rhea

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Posted 03 March 2004 - 09:49 PM

HubcapDave, on Mar 3 2004, 04:49 PM, said:

CJ AEGIS, on Mar 3 2004, 01:20 PM, said:

Quote

U.S. Constitution:Article IV: Section 3. New states may be admitted by the Congress into this union; but no new states shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of the states concerned as well as of the Congress.


And thus the State of Franklin died a quiet death.
But it was fun while it lasted.  :cool:  :p
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#8 Nick

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Posted 04 March 2004 - 04:42 PM

HubcapDave, on Mar 3 2004, 06:49 PM, said:

And thus the State of Franklin died a quiet death.
^I thought that was a joke, at first.  Then I looked it up:

Quote

In August, 1784, a convention met at Jonesboro and formed a new State, with a constitution providing that lawyers, doctors and preachers should never be members of the legislature; but the people rejected it, and then adopted the constitution of North Carolina in November, 1785, at Greenville. They made a few changes in the North Carolina constitution, but called the State Franklin. John Sevier was elected governor and David Campbell judge of the Superior court. Greenville was made the capital. The first legislature met in 1785; Landon Carter was the Speaker of the Senate, and Thomas Talbot clerk. William Gage was Speaker of the House, and Thomas Chapman clerk. The Convention made treaties with the Indians, opened courts, organized new counties, and fixed taxes and officers salaries to be paid in money, corn, tobacco, whiskey, skins, etc., including everything in common use among the people.

That would've been interesting!

-Nick



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