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Music industry fears new 100 hour CDS

Media Music 100 hour Cd's

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#1 ultraviolet

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Posted 14 March 2003 - 08:25 PM

Found this article about new tech developed to record 30 hours of mp3s onto a CD and 100 hours onto DVD and how music companies hate it.

http://www.newscient...p?id=ns99993490

as much as they think people will pay to download stuff off the internet, I think it will be easier to have a small anti-piracy fee on internet users.   Music companies can't stop new technology no matter how much it might hurt them.  it will always get out.  have a better one.

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#2 Anastashia

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Posted 14 March 2003 - 08:48 PM

I'm in some ways with the record company people on this. I don't believe the that the downloading of their product without paying is something that should be going on. However, there's no way I'd be willing to pay a general tax to allow those who are doing it to continue unchecked. To me that just fuels the problem.

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#3 Godeskian

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Posted 14 March 2003 - 09:02 PM

What the music industry needs to do is accept that they can't stop the internet functioning as a download hub

frankly, i'm not willing to pay 30 for a CD, that's almost 50 dollars, to get one song, and at least in Manchester you can't buy singles.

if i could download it from a legal site, i wouldn't mind paying for the song, i wouldn't even mind paying a decent amount for the song

but i'm not willing to be forced to pay 30 for a single song because the music industry is not willing to use new technology

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#4 Rhys

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Posted 14 March 2003 - 09:12 PM

Here's the problem, for the music industry:  If they embrace the new technology and distribution paradigms, a lot of their jobs go *poof!*

The people that are really paranoid about this are the mid-level development and distribution people.  If the musician can record & mix their stuff at home, then distribute it on the internet and make a buck at it, what do these people do?  The technology is already cutting into their job security:  A friend of mine is starting to make her way in the professional music biz, and when she evaluated her options getting started, she decided to form her own music publishing company rather than sign on with one of the existing corporations.  With the internet and modern digital technology, she can do that.

While I don't like it from a consumer standpoint, I do have some sympathy for the people trying to protect their jobs.

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#5 Ro-Astarte

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Posted 14 March 2003 - 09:18 PM

Technological development always does this to any industry. From cars to widgets to records. The same thing happened when digital began replacing vinyl. Life didn't end, but it didn't stay the same, either.

The ones who will win are the ones who find a way to embrace the technology to change their jobs. It's a hard sell to people who are scared, which is most of us when our jobs are threatened, but you'll see that's who ends up thriving no matter what technological changes are driving their industry.


And frankly, I'm all for more power in the ARTIST'S hands. The decks been stacked the other direction for way too long.

Ro

#6 GiGi

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Posted 14 March 2003 - 09:57 PM

Ro-Astarte, on Mar 14 2003, 10:15 AM, said:

And frankly, I'm all for more power in the ARTIST'S hands. The decks been stacked the other direction for way too long.
I couldn't agree more.  Especially given the choices that the industry gives us.  NU-Drom, Tremors, Mutant X.

I want to see more Farscape, more Firefly and I would happily pay for it!!!
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#7 Cuillin

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Posted 15 March 2003 - 04:56 AM

chiron777, on Mar 14 2003, 06:54 PM, said:

Ro-Astarte, on Mar 14 2003, 10:15 AM, said:

And frankly, I'm all for more power in the ARTIST'S hands. The decks been stacked the other direction for way too long.
I couldn't agree more.  Especially given the choices that the industry gives us.  NU-Drom, Tremors, Mutant X.

I want to see more Farscape, more Firefly and I would happily pay for it!!!
HERE! HERE!

I'll second what Ro Astarte says, the only reason I'd buy a CD is to go out of my way to support a particular Artist/Group.

Also: strongly agree with what chiron777 says about Quality TV!  We're losing FS, and gaining shows like Scare Tactics and Tremors  :eek:

I'm off to check out the DVD article....sounds cool!

Chris (very picky about TV and music!)

#8 Gvambat

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Posted 15 March 2003 - 05:28 AM

Hmm. I'm probably exposing my ignorance, but my first impluse to this was "What's the big deal, it's twenty extra minutes?"

I don't know why, but when you make a music cd, you take a whole lot more space to write relatively little music compaired to a data cd. Just looking at the music I've got stored on my harddrive, I could write a data cd containing the information from five music cd's and only use about a third of the available space.  (average music cd size = 40 mb, average space on a CD-R = 700, realistically 670 mb). Throw winamp and a few playlists on there, and I can have hours of music on one cd that'll play in almost any computer. It won't play everywhere, but neither will the new discs, if I read the article correctly.
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#9 Rhys

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Posted 15 March 2003 - 06:07 AM

Gvambat, on Mar 14 2003, 09:25 PM, said:

Hmm. I'm probably exposing my ignorance, but my first impluse to this was "What's the big deal, it's twenty extra minutes?"
100 hours, not minutes.

Rhys
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#10 Gvambat

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Posted 15 March 2003 - 06:46 AM

Oh, duh.

*hits self upside head*

Thought sleep might've been a good idea last night.
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#11 Delvo

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Posted 15 March 2003 - 04:19 PM

Part of the reason why standard CDs hold less music than you might expect them to is because of the file format. The original digital music format that CDs used was .WAV or a relative of it, which reproduces sound very accurately and is easy to make players that can decode it. The MPG people didn't come up with their "3" sound file format until years after the CD was established, and making a player that can decode it is a bit trickier (especially since they usually ALSO have to still be able to decode the original kind of CD) and thus more expensive. The second reason is that laser disk hardware can now hold more data than the original disks did, which is why DVDs can have longer run times despite having to contain both sound (often surround-sound) and video.

But, since the MP3 format has been around for a while and the DVD hardware (even in re-recordable form) has been around for a while, what this article's talking about isn't really anything new. With a computer equipped with a CD or DVD "write" drive, you can make disks holding huge amounts of any digital information. The only catch is that now they're talking about a dedicated recording machine, rather than just a function of a computer.

I don't believe this is going to seriously impact the way things go in the music industry, because they're not going to sell well. It doesn't appeal to much of the market, being unable to do anything new or better than what people can already do.

Because it's a recorder, not a computer, you can't download stuff from the internet with it. That means people can only use it to record stuff that they already have or stuff that's being broadcast, just like with tape recorders. But a key difference between writing a disk and recording sound on a standard tape is that the disk has to be written all in one "session". Without having the keyboard and mouse and screen to interact with a jukebox program to manage the files first before the disk is written, users will encounter problems with making accurate "breaks" between one file and the next, controlling their order, naming & listing them, and coming back to an incomplete disk later to add more stuff. These aren't insurmountable issues, but consumers won't like them and building in workarounds for them in the recorders will make them more expensive. And the number of files the thing can hold will only mean that people will never really use the capacity they've got (which was already happening anyway), and won't even know where on the disk to find the one they want when they want it. "Jukebox" computer programs that organize and manage sound files are popular for a reason... and you might note that users break up their library into "playlists" because they just have a concept of how much music belongs together in a group like that anyway, whereas a whole bunch of files thrown onto one disk can't really belong together. The "more is better" mentality does exist in some consumers, but they're just collecting for the sake of collecting... and they're using the internet, which a recorder like this can't do, and they want stuff for free, which these recorders won't be even close to.



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