Jump to content


Getting an "Insecure Connection" warning for Exisle? No worry

Details in this thread

Why not stop using the term "African American"?

Culture African American lexicon Race

  • Please log in to reply
68 replies to this topic

#41 StarDust

StarDust
  • Islander
  • 1,155 posts

Posted 10 October 2004 - 11:12 AM

Most of the politically correct terms are ridiculous, inaccurate, and just a way to still be 'prejudice' but do it in a PC way.

None of them are accurate.

Many blacks disagree with the whole "african american" term.  None of the ones I know like it.  Whoopie Goldberg has gone on record as saying she is black, she does not come from Africa, she is an American, period. Those terms tend to imply that someone is less of an American, or some how less committed to being an American.  Neither angle is good.

I actually know several people born and raised in Africa, and while they are of varying ethnicities, not one of them is black.  Every one of them can call themselves African American more correctly than any black person born in America.  It's like someone coming from Italy to be an American calls themselves Italian American, as opposed to their descendents that are really only Americans.

Among other things, who ever came up with these PC names made a big mistake in giving groups the name of a continent when they are clearly refering to ethnicity/race.  The only continents where everyone was the same race originally were Australia ande Europe.  Even the Americas where not.  The current believe is that there were 3 waves across the Bering straight, the first 2 caucasiod, the last asoid, which explains the big difference between east coast indians, soutwest indians, and inuits (who are asoid), for example.  And it really doesn't matter what kind of people lived there hundreds or thousands of years ago.  Just how many generations of people have to live some place to count.

The only instance where a name change actually makes sense, is the one that is most difficult, American Indians.  I know I work with a lot of India Indians, and it can get confusing at times.  But all the alternatives have been touchy, and most American Indians still seem to  use the name Indian, because that's what they've always been.  Recently I saw the use of Amerindian, which is a combo of American Indian.  It's accurate and easy to say.

The most nonsensical ones where "African American" and changing the name of mongloids to asoids, oriental to asian.  Most of the people in asia are not of the 'asian' race, but they are asians, they live in Asia.  I noticed the woman, can't remember her name, the works for Bush's cabinet and spoke at the Republican convention, called herself "East Asian Pacific People". That's probably the most accurate, but quite a mouthfull.  Afain, using geography in a name for anything other than what you are a citizen of, what your home is, is asking for trouble.

But I've also noticed that the PC names are not used by the people they refer to.  It's like a bunch of white PC wantabees decided what would be the correct terminology and none of them actually bothered to talk to the actual people involved.

#42 Themis

Themis
  • Islander
  • 6,544 posts

Posted 10 October 2004 - 02:24 PM

I'm white with ancestors from England and Scotland.  But when asked what my "race" was, back in antiquity when there was Negroid, Causasian and what-have-you, I always checked "white" or "caucasian," whichever was written.  My biggest problem with these pc terms is related to that - when "African-American" is used as a "race."  It's not a race.  An African-American is the same race as a black Briton or black African or black French person, and those are NOT Arican-American.  To describe a group relating to its heritage is one thing; to use a heritage-related term on a form asking about race is another.  When I have to fill out any kind of form that queries my race (and it's amazing how many do) and "African American" is a choice, I usually fill in the line for "other" with "European American" in protest.  "African American" is just NOT a race.  If people use it that way, I'll use "European American" - makes just as much sense.

I asked a Brit friend once how a black Briton would describe him/herself and the answer was "British."  But that wasn't what I meant, I wondered what the person would say their race was, and actually I still do.

I know there's a lot of unfortunate history involved with being black in the US to complicate the issue, but "black" isn't even accurate as a name for a race - many "black" people are actually brown or lighter colors.  (And of course a lot of people are of mixed race - what race do they put down?).  Most of the "blacks" I run into daily are actually brown. I'm more pink than white, so white is no more an accurate term for race.  Why can't we just go back to scientific terms for race (I don't even remember what the one for American Indian was but I'm sure there was one) when that's what we're talking about and the use pc names for heritage-related designations, like Greek-American or whatever?  The really insulting terms were insults then and are just as insulting now - at least that hasn't changed and the same terms should be avoided unless someone just plain intends to be insulting.  

So, does anyone know what the scientific, anthropological terms for various races are now, or do they even exist any more??

Themis
Cats will never be extinct!

#43 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 10 October 2004 - 04:04 PM

Look, the bottom line is that it's inevitable to offend somebody, despite one's best intentions. There's simply nothing you can really do to avoid that. It REALLY is a catch 22, when you think about it. We can spend hours and hours discussing this subject, but the bottom line is that there will always be someone who's sensibilities are offended because he/she hasn't been addressed in a way that they deem "proper."

My feelings on this? Screw it all. :p :sarcasm: I'll do my best to be respectful to folks, but I can't see myself bending over backwards every waking moment to not offend someone. That's incredibly stupid, in my opinion.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again-it's un-natural to be liked by everyone. You do what you can. But if someone's not gonna like me for whatever reason, they just won't.  And I'll deal with that by whatever way I see fit.

(shrug)

:eh:
Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#44 Godeskian

Godeskian

    You'll be seein' rainbooms

  • Islander
  • 26,839 posts

Posted 10 October 2004 - 04:10 PM

I vaguely recall putting 'Homo Sapiens' down under race on the British census of 2001.

But then I also put down 'Jedi' under religion, so I doubt they took mine all to seriously.

Oh, and I'm with DM on this one. try to be respectfull, but don't spend all day, every day, policing your own thoughts to make sur enot a single things slips out. We all have better things to do with our time than that

Defy Gravity!


The Doctor: The universe is big. It's vast and complicated and ridiculous and sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles... and that's a theory. Nine hundred years and I've never seen one yet, but this will do me.


#45 Cardie

Cardie

    I'm a very *good* tailor

  • Administrator
  • 22,654 posts

Posted 10 October 2004 - 04:16 PM

Themis, on Oct 10 2004, 03:24 PM, said:

So, does anyone know what the scientific, anthropological terms for various races are now, or do they even exist any more??

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I think the latest scientific research indicates that strict divisions of the human population into a small number of "races" is inaccurate.  Despite a wide number of variations in external features, bone structures, etc. modern studies of the human genome demonstrate that there is almost no significant difference among humans at the genetic level.  Unfortunately we haven't gotten over the need to separate and classify.

I remember when the term "black" was just replacing "Negro," my friend Eva Ferguson and I put our arms side by side and I was darker, because I always tanned very easily.  Eva had been a "Negro" all her life but was a bit perplexed by suddenly becoming black.  I siad that if it was any consolation, I could be black, too.

Cardie
Nothing succeeds like excess.

#46 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 10 October 2004 - 04:38 PM

Nonny, on Oct 9 2004, 11:40 PM, said:

Digital Man, on Oct 9 2004, 07:07 AM, said:

I happen to be Hispanic. "Negro" is Spanish for "black." Hispanics use this word all the time. We have no problems with it. But used in an English context, the red flags of political incorrectness pop up. Why the double standard?!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I am thrilled to see you use "Hispanic."  Back in the days when I was still going to church, I had a verbal boxing match with a priest who objected to the word.  I am not Spanish, he said.  You speak Spanish, I said.  That's not the point, he said.  We never got to the point, so eventually I asked him what he prefered.  Latino, he said.  But you're not Latin, I said, and besides, I resent the reintroduction of gendered nouns to English.  So we brangled on and on, until he happened to refer to me as an Anglo.  Don't call me an Anglo, I said, with a name like Stuart, it's an insult.  But you speak English, he said.  And you speak Spanish, but you object to Hispanic, I said.  When I finally gave up and left, I left for good.  

I've lived in Southern California long enough to have given up on the fight against being called an "Anglo," but I doubt I'll ever get comfortable with it.  I mean, Scottish name!!!!!  Clue, perhaps?!!  Sigh.  

Good to know that "Hispanic" works for some.  

Nonny

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


You know what it is with me? I don't get offended easily. I can laugh at my own culture.

I remember there was some Seinfield (?) episode where Kramer accidentally set the Puerto Rican flag on fire. Quite a few Puerto Ricans were offended. I'm Puerto Rican /Venezuelan and I found that quite humorous. It's also why Howard Stern doesn't bother me. Whenever he's had Spanish folks on or when he talks about Spanish folks, Fred (his sound effects man) plays chicken sounds in the background. I find that hysterical.

If the idea behind the humor is to genuinely hurt people, that's where I draw the line. I don't see that in Howard's case, or in that Seinfield episode.

Perhaps part of the reason I'm the way I am is because of the amount of adversity I've had to face in my lifetime. That adversity has really made me focus on what is genuinely hurtful, and what isn't.

Life is too short and it can be VERY unpleasant. I'm not going to get ticked off over silly things like that Seinfield ep or Howard.

It's also why I see a lot of this "politcal correctness" as being a waste of time.  Having to reduce ourselves to labels, subdivisions, and whatnot just doesn't seem constructive.

The lyrics to two Rush songs come to mind. I'll leave you with them.

Saul

SUBDIVISIONS

Sprawling on the fringes of the city
In geometric order
An insulated border
In between the bright lights
And the far unlit unknown

Growing up it all seems so one-sided
Opinions all provided
The future pre-decided
Detached and subdivided
In the mass production zone
Nowhere is the dreamer or the misfit so alone

[Chorus:]
(Subdivisions)
In the high school halls
In the shopping malls
Conform or be cast out
(Subdivisions)
In the basement bars
In the backs of cars
Be cool or be cast out
Any escape might help to smooth the unattractive truth
But the suburbs have no charms to soothe the restless dreams of youth

Drawn like moths we drift into the city
The timeless old attraction
Cruising for the action
Lit up like a firefly
Just to feel the living night

Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights...


TERRITORIES

I see the Middle Kingdom between Heaven and Earth
Like the Chinese call the country of their birth
We all figure that our homes are set above
Other people than the ones we know and love
In every place with a name
They play the same territorial game
Hiding behind the lines
Sending up warning signs

The whole wide world
An endless universe
Yet we keep looking through
The eyeglass in reverse
Don't feed the people
But we feed the machines
Can't really feel
What international means
In different circles, we keep holding our ground
In different circles, we keep spinning round and round

We see so many tribes overrun and undermined
While their invaders dream of lands they've left behind
Better people...better food...and better beer...
Why move around the world when Eden was so near?
The bosses get talking so tough
And if that wasn't evil enough
We get the drunken and passionate pride
Of the citizens along for the ride

They shoot without shame
In the name of a piece of dirt
For a change of accent
Or the color of your shirt
Better the pride that resides
In a citizen of the world
Than the pride that divides
When a colorful rag is unfurled

Edited by Digital Man, 10 October 2004 - 04:47 PM.

Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#47 eechick

eechick
  • Islander
  • 4,219 posts

Posted 10 October 2004 - 07:05 PM

RommieSG, on Oct 8 2004, 11:41 PM, said:

And also, Black People can call each other Black People, with no repurcussions. Just look at the comedy routines of Chris Rock and Dave Chappelle. They're also able to call each other the ill-fated 'N' word, as if it were nothing.

I don't know anyone who is offended by being called black.  Polite people don't use the N-word.  

RommieSG, on Oct 8 2004, 11:41 PM, said:

But if a white person were to call a black person the 'N' word, you'd better prepare for some retaliation.

This is also true.  

I had a friend who thought that because she hung out with black people and some used the term that it was acceptable.  Had to set her straight.

Had another friend who was raised on a dairy farm in Colorado.  She was brought up using the term "Negro" so she still used it.  Had to update her, too.

Another friend told me that I was his only black friend.  Being the smartass that I am, I had to use the "I'm not a racist. I have a black friend".   He'd never heard that one.  :ninja:  I thought everyone knew that one.

In school we used to have Black Studies then Afro American Studies & now African Ameican Studies.  So the name changes as we redefine ourselves.

#48 Themis

Themis
  • Islander
  • 6,544 posts

Posted 11 October 2004 - 02:19 PM

This is on a Membership/Dues statement from the Nashville Bar Assn passed out at the office today:

Race/Ethnicity:  (Optional - used for statistical purposes only; this information is valuable to our NBA Minority Opportunities Committee to track diversity in the legal community)

Caucasian/White
Hispanic/Latino
Asian or Pacific Islander
Multi-Racial/Non-Minority  (huh?)
African-American/Black
Native American or Alaskan Native
Multi-Racial/Minority (huh??)
Other

If you're multi-racial, aren't you automatically minority in the US South?  What would be multi-racial non-minority? What would somebody whose heritage is middle eastern be?  I think that used to be Caucasian - but Hispanic/Latino is Caucasion and they separate that so why not separate middle east?  Would someone whose ancestors are middle east, hispanic and other caucasian be considered multi-racial majority??  

There are reasons for racial statistics - mostly medical - but this is ridiculous!!!

And I still wish we could go back to using Negro and Caucasian as applicable because most blacks aren't black and most whites are beige.

Themis
Cats will never be extinct!

#49 Psyche

Psyche
  • Islander
  • 13,556 posts

Posted 11 October 2004 - 04:15 PM

I don't call myself Scottish-Canadian. I'm just Canadian. I don't refer to black people as African-Canadian. They're simply Canadian, and "black" describes their phsyical appeareances, just like "white" describes mine.

But maybe thats just me.

#50 Consubstantial

Consubstantial

    Paradox by Incongruity

  • Islander
  • 851 posts

Posted 11 October 2004 - 05:35 PM

I just wanted to add the the word "race" began its use in the 1700's during the Imperialist phase of English colonization and was usually used to justify the subjugation of other peoples.  We are not different races.  We are all homo sapiens.  The word "race" continues to serve only to separate what should be a united people.

Jill wrote earlier that black Americans had asked to be called African Americans.  That is not entirely true.  Some black Americans have asked to be called African American.  Many black Americans are offended by the term and prefer to be called black.  Frankly, I use both.  I never know ahead of time what usage the individual prefers, so I switch hit.  I've asked acquaintences who prefer one or the other to cut me a little slack considering the variety of preferences and number of black friends I have.
From the start, our terms jump to conclusions--Kenneth Burke

#51 Nonny

Nonny

    Scourge of Pretentious Bad Latin

  • Islander
  • 31,142 posts

Posted 11 October 2004 - 05:49 PM

Handmaiden07, on Oct 10 2004, 04:51 AM, said:

^^^ You needn't have worried about the gendered noun issue. Latino is widely used in place of Hispanic, but I've never heard any but spanish speaking natives use Latina!

HM07

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Latino is just as gendered a noun as latina.  To me, "Hispanic" is as gender neutral as "mail carrier," while "latino" is as gendered as "mailman" and "latina" as "mailperson."  Using "-person" in place of "-man" never worked, because it was perceived to refer to females anyway.  :blink:  And as for "-man," it is supposed to be gender inclusive, but tests showed that most people assumed that job titles ending in "-man" were for men only.  I like finding a whole new inclusive title better anyway, but when the old one has to do, I prefer emphasizing that it is inclusive.  

Take "airman" for instance.  I was an Airman First Class when I was in Avionics tech school in the Air Force.  I was one of the first three women in my school.  The guys used to yuck it up and call us "Airperson ____," which really annoyed us, till I turned it back on them and they stopped.  All I had to do was call them "Airperson ____" back, and suddenly it wasn't funny anymore.  They'd try to explain, but explaining a joke kinda ruins it, and I'd play all innocent and say, "but aren't YOU a person too?"   :lol:   Humor got the job done that time.  

I guess I can accept latino, so long as nobody ever calls me an angla.   :unsure:  Bad enough being called an anglo.  Though gringa doesn't bother me.   :rolleyes:

Nonny
Posted Image


The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#52 Nonny

Nonny

    Scourge of Pretentious Bad Latin

  • Islander
  • 31,142 posts

Posted 11 October 2004 - 05:57 PM

Consubstantial, on Oct 11 2004, 10:35 PM, said:

Some black Americans have asked to be called African American.  Many black Americans are offended by the term and prefer to be called black.  Frankly, I use both.  I never know ahead of time what usage the individual prefers, so I switch hit.  I've asked acquaintences who prefer one or the other to cut me a little slack considering the variety of preferences and number of black friends I have.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I know I'm happy that the disphonious "spade cat" of the mid 60s died a quick and painful death.   :hehe:

Nonny
Posted Image


The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#53 Delvo

Delvo
  • Islander
  • 9,273 posts

Posted 11 October 2004 - 06:01 PM

Themis, on Oct 11 2004, 01:19 PM, said:

What would somebody whose heritage is middle eastern be?  I think that used to be Caucasian - but Hispanic/Latino is Caucasion and they separate that so why not separate middle east?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The Middle East is on Asia, so they're Caucasian Asians, which is an example of one of the problems with the word "Asian" as a substitute for "Oriental" (the other one being people such as one who's posted in here, with Japanese ancestry, since Japan is not part of the continent). But using "Asian" to mean "Oriental" means that people from Asia who aren't Oriental or Asoid or Mongoloid or whatever would have to be some other race, which would nearly always be Caucasian.

#54 Delvo

Delvo
  • Islander
  • 9,273 posts

Posted 11 October 2004 - 07:29 PM

Themis, on Oct 10 2004, 01:24 PM, said:

Why can't we just go back to scientific terms for race (I don't even remember what the one for American Indian was but I'm sure there was one)... does anyone know what the scientific, anthropological terms for various races are now, or do they even exist any more?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Caucasians were always and still are Caucasians, or Caucasoids (the "oid" fits the pattern of names of the others better). This isn't now used more than it is for three reasons. One is that its counterparts for the other races aren't used much either for their own separate reasons, Another is that it was based on the notion that this race was first established as a separate race while living in the Caucasus Mountains, which is no longer believed to be the case. Also, the word has been used somewhat wrongly by too many people, to the point where sometimes it's not understood; people see or hear the word "Caucasian" and think "white", which only really applies to Europeans, and arguably not even some of the southernmost of them. But the word was supposed to also include people of the same basic group native to western Asian and southern Asia as far east as India, and northern Africans of the same basic racial group as well. (They look at a glance like Middle Easterners, only darker than them or even the most southern Europeans, although still not as dark as black people. They also often have bigger nostrils and lips than other Caucasians but still much less than black people. See the guy on the right in the attached image if you're having trouble picturing in your mind a native African that's not black.)

Orientals, other non-Caucasoid Eurasians, and American Indians were once called Mongoloid, based on the name Mongolia, but that word somehow also came to be used for people with Down's Syndrome, so it fell out of use, and no succinct replacement has appeared.

Back when those words were in use, the very-dark-skinned, very-curly-haired, thick-lipped, and wide-nostrilled people, which is everyone who's not one of those two Eurasian groups mentioned above, were all called "Negroid", and that completed the basic three-way division of the species. But back then, though, the people trying to figure out such things had had little experience with that group. Now, based on much more information than was available back then, the former Negroid group is split up some more:
1. "Black" people, who spread over and came to dominate most of Africa from a point of origin right on the equator between Nigeria and the Congo; if and when the term "Negroid" is still be used today, it refers to these people, as if by default because they're the ones that the original coiners of the term knew about and were talking about, both because of their dominance of Africa and because almost all slaves were of this race. Their skin really does tend to be just about black, darker than the other dark races I'm about to describe, when in a "tanned" state, but can fade to a less distinct dark brown in lower sunlight. Since none of the USA has as much sunlight as their homeland, and because of the amount of time spent inside by many Americans, and because of various degrees of interbreeding with paler races, almost no black Americans ever get as dark as the race can really get, which can make distinguishing them from the other dark races more difficult than it would have been, but still not impossible. It's not a distinction most people ever need to learn how to make, though, because the groups I'm about to mention below are seldom seen outside their "native" territories anyway...
2. The Khoi and San, or Khoi-San; the name comes from the names of two small groups of tribes which occupy certain pockets of Africa too arid for Bantu agriculture practiced by the blacks. Because they're rather dark and have big nostrils and lips and curly hair, they might look like blacks at a glance, but are distinct by having even more tightly coiled hair, some facial features I don't quite remember (maybe wideness and flatness), more fat on the hips and butts of the women, and not-quite-so-dark, reddish skin. This group might be the most ancient, having separated from the rest the longest ago, with more disinct DNA and a very unique set of languages; their langauges are the ones famous for the clicking, which doesn't exist in other languages except a few Bantu ones that seem to have picked it up from the Khoi-San. The old Caucasoid/Mongoloid/Negroid classification had no word for them, and hasn't added one because of the old labels having fallen into disuse by the time Westerners came to recognize the distinctions.
3. African Pygmies; unlike other pygmies in some parts of the world, these people are the only genetic Pygmies. Of the two basic growth modes, fast and slow, that most humans can switch in and out of based on how well we're fed, these tribes actually lack a gene or set of genes for the fast mode, so they never switch out of the slow mode no matter how well they're fed, and thus they stay small even at full size. But that's not their only unique physical trait; the brownness of their skin has a distinct yellowish tint to it, and their nasal and cheekbones don't protrude much, as if they were sort of collapsed back into the rest of the face, which makes it look somewhat as if their nearly bridgeless noses were turned up at the bottom and/or their foreheads were leaning forward. I just made it sound more drastic and freakish than it really is, but I don't know how else to describe it. As with the Khoi-San, the old Caucasoid/Mongoloid/Negroid classification had no word for them, and hasn't added one because of the old labels having fallen into disuse by the time Westerners came to recognize the distinctions.
4. A group that was rather silly not to have been separated from the Africans in the first place, just based on geographic isolation: the natives of Australia and the New Guinea highlands. They're dark with thick lips and wide nostrils and curly hair, but are very easy to tell apart from any of the dark African groups because they have bony faces, with all of the usual human bony points and protrusions protruding more than in other races, as well as somewhat larger jaws and teeth. I seem to recall that the old Caucasoid/Mongoloid/Negroid classification did briefly include an added fourth category, something like "Australoid", for them, but it's the rarest of those terms because the use of all of the "oid" words ended soon after it was added.

Attached Files



#55 Robert Hewitt Wolfe

Robert Hewitt Wolfe
  • Demigod
  • 2,247 posts

Posted 12 October 2004 - 03:19 AM

Delvo, on Oct 12 2004, 12:29 AM, said:

4. A group that was rather silly not to have been separated from the Africans in the first place, just based on geographic isolation: the natives of Australia and the New Guinea highlands. They're dark...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Having been there, I can tell you that people in the PNG highlands call themselves "black" and call everyone who's NOT dark skinned "white," including Asians.  It's the only place my wife has ever been considered both tall (she's 5'2") and white (she's Chinese-American).  

Just an aside, but it does show that people all over the world see race differently.

"There are monsters, there are angels...
There's a peacefulness and a rage inside us all."
----------------------------------
Voice of the Beehive


#56 gaius claudius

gaius claudius

    I'm bringing the sexy back!!

  • Islander
  • 1,895 posts

Posted 15 October 2004 - 05:41 AM

I don't know...maybe its just me..but as an "african american" male. I find it a little..well...I don't even have a word for it...that its even up for discussion..its ike you're all talking around us (me) without taking to me (us)..since no one else in the discussion has described themselves as "black"

  And yes ...I do use both terms interchangeably...and yes on occaison I even (still) use the "n" word with other "blacks" depending on the circumstance


I'm not by any means saying you don't have a right to have the discussion, its just feels rather strange reading the various comments, which are basically discussing my identity.

I generally don't use the term african american that much, simply because no one in family been in Africa for about 4 or 5 generations....


gc   :devil:
I seek the truth...it is only persistence in self-delusion and ignorance that does harm.
- Marcus Aurelius

King Mob 42

#57 QueenTiye

QueenTiye

    Behavior is not reproducible over multiple trials.

  • Islander
  • 24,353 posts

Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:33 AM

gaius claudius, on Oct 15 2004, 06:41 AM, said:

I don't know...maybe its just me..but as an "african american" male. I find it a little..well...I don't even have a word for it...that its even up for discussion..its ike you're all talking around us (me) without taking to me (us)..since no one else in the discussion has described themselves as "black"

And yes ...I do use both terms interchangeably...and yes on occaison I even (still) use the "n" word with other "blacks" depending on the circumstance


I'm not by any means saying you don't have a right to have the discussion, its just feels rather strange reading the various comments, which are basically discussing my identity.

I generally don't use the term african american that much, simply because no one in family been in Africa for about 4 or 5 generations....


gc  :devil:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :(

I'm African-American...

HM07

Edited by Handmaiden07, 15 October 2004 - 08:33 AM.

Een Draght Mackt Maght


#58 Nonny

Nonny

    Scourge of Pretentious Bad Latin

  • Islander
  • 31,142 posts

Posted 15 October 2004 - 08:43 AM

gaius claudius, on Oct 15 2004, 10:41 AM, said:

I'm not by any means saying you don't have a right to have the discussion, its just feels rather strange reading the various comments, which are basically discussing my identity.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

No matter what we look like, we do use language, and this is a problem area of language for many of us.  A solution that pleases everybody would be nice.   :blush:

Nonny
Posted Image


The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#59 gaius claudius

gaius claudius

    I'm bringing the sexy back!!

  • Islander
  • 1,895 posts

Posted 15 October 2004 - 09:15 AM

Handmaiden07, on Oct 15 2004, 09:33 AM, said:

gaius claudius, on Oct 15 2004, 06:41 AM, said:

I don't know...maybe its just me..but as an "african american" male. I find it a little..well...I don't even have a word for it...that its even up for discussion..its ike you're all talking around us (me) without taking to me (us)..since no one else in the discussion has described themselves as "black"

And yes ...I do use both terms interchangeably...and yes on occaison I even (still) use the "n" word with other "blacks" depending on the circumstance


I'm not by any means saying you don't have a right to have the discussion, its just feels rather strange reading the various comments, which are basically discussing my identity.

I generally don't use the term african american that much, simply because no one in family been in Africa for about 4 or 5 generations....


gc :devil:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :(

I'm African-American...

HM07

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Sorry HM....I did (do ) know that....it just from the tone of the discussion I felt for a litte while like i was being examined in a petri dish...


gc   :devil:
I seek the truth...it is only persistence in self-delusion and ignorance that does harm.
- Marcus Aurelius

King Mob 42

#60 QueenTiye

QueenTiye

    Behavior is not reproducible over multiple trials.

  • Islander
  • 24,353 posts

Posted 15 October 2004 - 10:21 AM

gaius claudius, on Oct 15 2004, 10:15 AM, said:

Sorry HM....I did (do ) know that....it just from the tone of the discussion I felt for a litte while like i was being examined in a petri dish...


gc   :devil:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


{{{{{{{{{{{{{{gaius claudius}}}}}}}}}}}}}}} I know the feeling.

{{{{{{{{{{{{{{gaius claudius}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}


HM07

Een Draght Mackt Maght




Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Culture, African American, lexicon, Race

0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users