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How do you stay informed?

OT Member Poll 2003

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9 replies to this topic

Poll: How do you stay informed? (32 member(s) have cast votes)

How do you stay informed?

  1. 1. I mostly watch news on the television. (3 votes [9.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 9.38%

  2. 2. I mostly read the newspapers. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. 3. I mostly surf the Net. (2 votes [6.25%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.25%

  4. 4. I watch TV, read the papers, and surf the Net equally. (7 votes [21.88%])

    Percentage of vote: 21.88%

  5. 5. I watch TV news and read the papers about equally. (2 votes [6.25%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.25%

  6. 6. I watch TV and surf the Net equally. (12 votes [37.50%])

    Percentage of vote: 37.50%

  7. 7. I read newspapers and surf the Net equally. (2 votes [6.25%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.25%

  8. 8. I don't stay informed on my own. Other people tell me when something big happens. (1 votes [3.12%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.12%

  9. 9. I don't care about the war. (1 votes [3.12%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.12%

  10. 10. I make love, not war. (2 votes [6.25%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.25%

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#1 Kevin Street

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 01:00 AM

I've tried to stay away from the news the last couple of days. But like a flash addiction, the urge to find out what's happening is always there, gnawing away. So I compromise by checking out the news for an hour or so each day.

But it quickly became apparent that all war coverage is not the same, partularly for someone who isn't connected 24/7.

For me, TV news has been a big disappointment. With it's perpetual need for sensationalism and misleading "you are here" POVS, the television sends out an endless stream of pictures, but little actual content. After the fifth embedded reporter broadcast pictures of palm trees and bedouins while experts in the studio at home breathlessly speculated away on what might happen next, I was too disgusted to stand any more, so I switched off the box.

The newspapers have been very informative, but the nature of their format ensures that the news they contain is at least half a day old. That used to be fine, but in today's wired world, half a day or more is usually too slow. I still read the war coverage in the newspapers, though, because they excel at providing detailed background information and subtle details other news sources often lack.

But, imo, the best way to keep up to date on this war is the Internet. (No surprise to anyone here, probably.) The websites of networks like CNN and most importantly, newspapers like the London Times and the New York Times, are very informative and fairly timely. (Not quite as quick as TV, but they don't make you wait for hours while nothing happens, either.) And the Net provides that rarest kind of information - different points of view. It's really amazing to read about the bombing of Baghdad on a news site, and then click onto the "Where's Raed" blog or one of the reporter's blogs and read about what the bombing feels like, firsthand. (And there's the war threads at Ex Isle, too.)

More and more, it seems to me that the Internet and modern newspapers are combining into one huge, efficient information machine, leaving television and radio in the dust.

But what do you think?
Per aspera ad astra

#2 Ro-Astarte

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 01:04 AM

I have MSNBC or ABC News on for chunks of time to catch any breaking news, but by and large the internet or the newspaper is the way I'm getting my news on the war.

The camera is a voracious consumer. It demands a story even when there's no skeleton to hang one on.

Which leaves dueling pundits and experts. Some of whom are informative.

Ro

#3 Lyric of Delphi

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 01:10 AM

Sir Kevin, you are not alone in the opinion that the news on television has become nothing more than a POV fest with actual information thrown in. It is extremely annoying. I try to watch, and then I hear, "So how do you think they feel about this on the front lines?" Why do we care, may I ask?

However, the television has been my main informant through this ordeal so far, so I can't complain too much.

#4 MovieImp

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 01:14 AM

To be honest, ExIsle is my most used news source.  You guys are the best and netting it out and keeping me up to date on stuff.
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#5 Neptunian

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 01:18 AM

You forgot to put the good old radio up there. I never turn mine off.

#6 Kevin Street

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 01:25 AM

Good point, radio should've been one of the choices. :)

Argh! Knew I'd forget one... :blush:
Per aspera ad astra

#7 StarGazer

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 08:03 AM

I watch a lot of news on BBC, CBC and CNN.

#8 RommieSG

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 08:14 AM

CNN, MSNBC, FOX News, ABC News, CBS News, BBC America News, Newspapers, GOOGLE, various news sites. I get it all. ;)

Rommie :whatsthat:
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#9 Anakam

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 08:55 AM

What MovieImp said. :)
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#10 AnneZo

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Posted 25 March 2003 - 08:56 AM

I like blogs.  :crazy:   You get the cream of the coverage without having to read the same AP or Reuters stories again and again.

Of course, blogs and other news sites, come in "conservative" (Wall St Journal, Fox, London Times, Washington Times) or "liberal" (NYTimes, sort of, BBC, LATimes, Washington Post, Alternet) and you have to choose your flavor or mix judiciously.  (Note! Some ordinarily "liberal" media has gone very warhawkish and I'd advise culling news from multiple sites to get perspective.)

Blogwise, Liberal:

For up-to-the-second coverage distilled from news sites all over the world, you can't do better than to check out The Agonist (http://www.agonist.org/) several times a day.  

Another good site, although updated less frequently, is Daily Kos (http://www.agonist.org/).

Hesiod, over at Counterspin (http://www.agonist.org/) updates several times a day.

And, of course, for coverage from Bagdad itself, you have to read Salam Pax, a 25 year-old guy who has been blogging the run-up to war in his native country and is now (when he can get online) telling us what things are like in Bagdad.

Nes, On-line, Conservative

The infamous Lucianne (http://www.lucianne.com/), of course.

The Blog Queen himself, Andrew Sullivan (http://andrewsullivan.com/), who is happy, I noticed a second ago, to assure us that the war is going fabulously well.

Also, both the ABC and CBS sites are giving continuous coverage and, of course, you can always check the AP or Reuters sites yourself and save the seconds you'd have to wait :) to see similar stories on other newsites.

Anne, who can offer up to 20 more sites if anyone is
interested and who clearly has an addiction problem
with the news.

Edited by AnneZo, 25 March 2003 - 08:58 AM.




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