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NASA Loses contact with Columbia

NASA Columbia

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#21 CJ AEGIS

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 10:53 AM

My thoughts are with the families of the astronauts and the members of NASA.  CNN has announced that NASA is running a new conference in 45 minutes.  11:30 ET

I just hope this doesn’t kill the manned spaceflight program or the ISS with it.  This is likely to be the death knell of the shuttle program.  They need at least four shuttles to keep the program going.  That coupled and that this may very well have been brought on by stress over the years on Columbia.  Hopefully they can dump enough money into the Russian space program to keep the ISS going with Soyuz.  It is a time to mourn but also a time to keep in mind that the best way to honor them would be to return to space as soon as possible.


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Una Salus Lillius: and those cheesy nbc *^&%%&s.  I mean how can they start talking terrorism in the same breath that they are saying it's premature.

I don’t think it could have been a terrorist attack.  You’re not going to sneak in a missile that can hit a shuttle at that speed and attitude or crash and aircraft into one.  She was at 200,000 feet over Texas at 12,500 mph when she was coming in over Texas.  The only way I can think of is the outside of someone on the inside of NASA tampering with the programming. You’re dealing with a highly outside chance…

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#22 Bad Wolf

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 10:53 AM

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#23 Alexandria

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 10:55 AM

This is just a sad day. But we have to wait and see what happens, hopefully they will find what went wrong soon.
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#24 Aurelius

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:14 AM

Eternal peace grant unto them, O Lord and let perpertual light shine upon them. May they Rest in Peace. Amen.

A black day :(  

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#25 Christopher

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:17 AM

Rationally, there's no chance that this is terrorism.  Hopefully people will soon stop bandying such silliness around.  The problem is, not everyone is rational.  Due to the coincidence of one of the astronauts being Israeli, there are bound to be a thousand conspiracy theories, and probably the Muslim-bashers here and abroad will welcome any flimsy excuse to bash some more.

But the fact is, of course, that any given astronaut is in more mortal danger driving down the freeway to the Cape than travelling into space.  The conditions are far more controlled in the latter case.  And there have only been two catastrophes out of 107 STS missions -- that's over a 98 percent success record, which is pretty good.

I kinda don't think this will lead to a moratorium on spaceflight as extensive as the post-Challenger one.  At the very least, there are still people up there on the ISS who would need to be retrieved.  Otherwise, the shuttle program is much more mature and proven than it was back in '86.  Certainly there will be extra care taken, efforts made to avoid such problems in the future, but nothing as extreme as what happened last time.

Someone earlier in this thread cited this as proof that spaceflight still isn't routine.  I have to disagree.  Air travel is routine, and plane crashes still happen.  Car travel is routine, but it's one of the top three non-disease killers in America, right up there with guns and tobacco.  "Routine" isn't where nobody dies.  "Routine" is where people accept the risk and move on.  So what happens next will determine whether spaceflight has become routine.

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#26 Godeskian

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:24 AM

17 years ago we lost challenger,

we've just lost columbia

:( oh jeezus

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#27 CJ AEGIS

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:26 AM

Christopher, on Feb. 01 2003,16:17, said:

I kinda don't think this will lead to a moratorium on spaceflight as extensive as the post-Challenger one.  At the very least, there are still people up there on the ISS who would need to be retrieved.
Can they keep the program going with only three shuttles?  I’ve heard before that is why they needed the 5th shuttle after the loss of Challenger.  I would think Soyuz could handle some of the extra weight of maintaining the ISS while the shuttle fleet is down.
"History has proven too often and too recently that the nation which relaxes its defenses invites attack."
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"Their sailors say they should have flight pay and sub pay both -- they're in the air half the time, under the water the other half""
        - Ernie Pyle: Aboard a DE

#28 Anna

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:29 AM

Christopher, on Feb. 01 2003,16:17, said:

Someone earlier in this thread cited this as proof that spaceflight still isn't routine.  I have to disagree.  Air travel is routine, and plane crashes still happen.  Car travel is routine, but it's one of the top three non-disease killers in America, right up there with guns and tobacco.  "Routine" isn't where nobody dies.  "Routine" is where people accept the risk and move on.  So what happens next will determine whether spaceflight has become routine.
Thank you, Christopher. That puts things in much better perspective. It's a tragedy, but those brave astronauts knew and accepted the risk of what they were doing.

My thoughts and prayers go out to the families.

Anna


#29 Godeskian

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:30 AM

Setting material concerns aside, will the public be willing to continue the practice considering the loss of life each time.

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#30 Bad Wolf

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:38 AM

Gode more life is lost on the highways every day.  You don't see the public giving up on cars do you?

We can't stick our heads in the sand like ostriches.  Space exploration should continue.

I just hope that the views of shorter sighted people will  not prevail.

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#31 Anna

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:39 AM

^ AMEN!

Anna


#32 Bad Wolf

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:41 AM

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#33 Neroon

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:44 AM

I have always followed the space program, having grown up during the Mercury/Gemini/Apollo years.  I would stop whatever I was doing to watch any space launch on TV.  My dream has been to go watch an actual shuttle launch in person...... damned if I will ever be able to do that now.  But I care not at all for any perceived loss on my part.  That's nothing.  It's the friends and families of those 7 stars that have now been lost to the night that I think about. The wives and husbands who will only have the memory of a kiss. The children without .....

.........damn, damn, damn, DAMN. :(

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#34 Bad Wolf

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:47 AM

:(

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*wipes away tears*

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#35 DWF

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:49 AM

Neroon, on Feb. 01 2003,17:52, said:

I had just gotten up and turned on the TV to catch some news, when I saw the report on Fox News that NASA had lost ocntact with the shuttle.  Then I cam down here to my computer and logged.  In a couple of minutes my wife called me back upstairs with the comments about the coverage...... and I began to get that sick feeling that this was more than serious.

This is unreal.....
Hang in there Neroon

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#36 Kes

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:50 AM

Christopher, on Feb. 01 2003,16:17, said:

 "Routine" isn't where nobody dies.  "Routine" is where people accept the risk and move on.  So what happens next will determine whether spaceflight has become routine.

Thank you Christopher, you always state things so well.   Today I find myself very sad for all the families of those on board and for the Nasa personnel who work so hard to keep their friends and co-workers safe, but not filled with disbelief as I was when the Challenger tragedy occurred.

Accidents are going to happen in the space program.    Acceptable risks are probably evaluated everyday by Nasa personnel.  I hope any corrective measures will be taken that need to be made and the shuttle program will be flying again soon.  I can't help but believe the astronauts on board Columbia would feel the same way.


But these things will come later.  This is the time to mourn the loss of some of America's best...heros to many.  My thoughts are with the families of the fine people our country (and Israel) lost today.


Kes


#37 Anna

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:51 AM

Neroon, on Feb. 01 2003,16:44, said:

My dream has been to go watch an actual shuttle launch in person...... damned if I will ever be able to do that now.
Neroon, there's no reason to give up on your dream. We'll figure out what happened and we'll be back in space. I've had friends at launches before. AFTER Challenger. Shuttle Commander Eileen Collins is a member of a women's pilot group I belong to. She's invited members of our group to go to her launches. It'll happen, but you'll have to be patient. But dreams are worth waiting for, right?

{{{Neroon}}}

Anna


#38 Godeskian

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:54 AM

{{{neroon}}}

I....

dammit, dammit, dammit. This is so sad. the lives lost, is incredible

how do you tell kids that this has just happened to them.

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#39 Christopher

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 11:58 AM

CJ AEGIS, on Feb. 01 2003,11:26, said:

Can they keep the program going with only three shuttles?  I’ve heard before that is why they needed the 5th shuttle after the loss of Challenger.  I would think Soyuz could handle some of the extra weight of maintaining the ISS while the shuttle fleet is down.
Hmm, you have a point.  I believe space travel will continue, but maybe the STS program won't be able to carry the sole weight of it anymore -- and maybe it shouldn't.  We're well overdue for the next generation of orbiters.  I believe the project to develop a reusable space plane is already well underway, and hopefully more effort will be put into that in the future.
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#40 Godeskian

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Posted 01 February 2003 - 12:02 PM

Three shuttles really aren't enough is it though

they'll have to build new ones

Defy Gravity!


The Doctor: The universe is big. It's vast and complicated and ridiculous and sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles... and that's a theory. Nine hundred years and I've never seen one yet, but this will do me.




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