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Bush Approval Rating

Bush Approval rating 2005

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#41 Anarch

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Posted 01 September 2005 - 03:24 AM

Actually, on reflection, I was wrong: we didn't say exactly the same thing.

Nick, on Aug 29 2005, 10:48 PM, said:

The global warming/more & worse hurricanes link is a tenuous one at best.

That's not really correct: increasing the (thermal) energy of the climate is going to increase the severity of catastrophic (in the technical sense) shifts in weather, including such phenomena as hurricanes.  [Also, paradoxically, cold spells.]  The mathematics of catastrophe theory aren't completely worked out, of course, but they're solid enough, and the models uniform enough in that conclusion, that I think we can take that as fact.

We also have -- and I know this is opening a can of worms I don't particularly feel like addressing -- sufficient evidence to conclude the existence and non-triviality of anthropogenic warming, such that it's reasonable to infer that a causal link between human-created emissions and increased catastrophic behavior.

What isn't at all clear, and this is what your subsequent sentences correctly address, is how these effects lie within the broader scope of climatological evolution (no, not Darwinian, I have a limit as to how many buttons I plan to push in a single post), nor how policies impact this evolution.  The very nature of catastrophic change is such that direct causation between a particular policy and a particular event is all-but-impossible, and correlation isn't much easier.  That said, within that broader question, the necessity is clear: just because our policies might be subsumed within a broader sweep doesn't mean that we shouldn't change them to create less adverse effects (i.e. fewer emissions), any more than the prospect of winning the lottery should prevent us from saving some money for a rainy day.  Or whatever appropriate metaphor you prefer that doesn't suck.

[And I should note I haven't seen any credible evidence for global dimming acting in the way you're describing here, although I've seen a few people pushing it as some kind "natural" counterbalancing to anthropogenic warming...]

Quote

(plus the fact that there are simply more people in more places that no matter WHERE one of these storms hit, it's going to be a direct hit on some densely populated area.)

That's completely correct and, for the purposes of my original point, utterly irrelevant.  It is, however, vitally important to remember that when crafting policies that impact either the frequency or the severity of such phenomena in future.

#42 Spectacles

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 05:40 PM

A couple of post-hurricane polls from the past couple of days:

Newsweek:

http://www.msnbc.msn.../site/newsweek/

Quote

Only 38 percent of Americans approve of the way Bush is doing his job overall, a record-low for this president in the NEWSWEEK poll. (Fifty-five percent of Americans disapprove of his overall job performance.) And only 28 percent of Americans say they are “satisfied with the way things are going” in the country, down from 36 percent in August and 46 percent in December, after the president’s re-election. This is another record low and two points below the satisfaction level recorded immediately after the Abu Ghraib prison abuse scandal came to light. Fully two-thirds of Americans are not satisfied with the direction of the country.


AP/Ipsos

http://news.yahoo.co...zkxBHNlYwN0bQ--

Quote

Sat Sep 10, 8:37 AM ET



WASHINGTON -     President Bush's job approval has dipped below 40 percent for the first time in the AP-Ipsos poll, reflecting widespread doubts about his handling of gasoline prices and the response to Hurricane Katrina.


Nearly four years after Bush's job approval soared into the 80s after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, Bush was at 39 percent job approval in an AP-Ipsos poll taken this week. That's the lowest since the the poll was started in December 2003.

The public's view of the nation's direction has grown increasingly negative as well, with nearly two-thirds now saying the country is heading down the wrong track.

Edited by Spectacles, 10 September 2005 - 05:40 PM.

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#43 Spectacles

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 07:06 AM

CBS's latest poll has Bush with a 34% approval rating; Cheney is at 18%.

Anybody know how they compare to Nixon and Agnew?



Here's the link:

http://www.cbsnews.c...in1350874.shtml

Ah. Found an answer to my question. Nixon dropped down to 24% approval right before he resigned. So Bush is ten points higher than Nixon. Cheney, however, is another story. I don't know how his ratings compare to Agnew's, but it's pretty bad when your approval rating dips below Nixon's.


http://www.cbsnews.c...in1005327.shtml
"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman

#44 Broph

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 07:24 AM

View PostAnarch, on Sep 1 2005, 08:24 AM, said:

That's not really correct: increasing the (thermal) energy of the climate is going to increase the severity of catastrophic (in the technical sense) shifts in weather, including such phenomena as hurricanes.  [Also, paradoxically, cold spells.]  The mathematics of catastrophe theory aren't completely worked out, of course, but they're solid enough, and the models uniform enough in that conclusion, that I think we can take that as fact.

You should check out "State of Fear" by Michael Crichton. While it's a work of fiction, it has a lot to say on this subject that might open up some eyes.

View PostSpectacles, on Feb 28 2006, 12:06 PM, said:

CBS's latest poll has Bush with a 34% approval rating; Cheney is at 18%.

Do most people even know what Cheney does (besides shooting lawyers) that they can rate him at 18%?

Interesting that this thread on the approval rating was before the whole wiretapping thing - and things just went downhill from there!

#45 Godeskian

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 07:51 AM

And yet, he's still in charge.

Defy Gravity!


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#46 waterpanther

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 08:01 AM

Gode, there are only two ways, other than death, a sitting US president can be got rid of.  He can resign, as Nixon did and as Bush is unlikely to do, or he can be impeached, convicted and removed from office.  The latter course requires action by Congress, and that's not going to happen with both the House and the Senate under Republican control.  If Bush/Cheney's low ratings translate into a Democratic Congress in November, however, then we're looking at a very different scenario.
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#47 Godeskian

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 08:32 AM

View Postwaterpanther, on Feb 28 2006, 03:01 PM, said:

Gode, there are only two ways, other than death, a sitting US president can be got rid of.  He can resign, as Nixon did and as Bush is unlikely to do, or he can be impeached, convicted and removed from office.  The latter course requires action by Congress, and that's not going to happen with both the House and the Senate under Republican control.

Then the solution seems rather obvious doesn't it?

And yet, I have a nasty feeling that the democrats will fail as completely this november as they did the last time.

Incidentally, why aren't people putting pressure on their congressmen and woman and their senators and other elected officials to do something?

Edited by Godeskian, 28 February 2006 - 08:33 AM.

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#48 Zwolf

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 09:38 AM

Quote

And yet, I have a nasty feeling that the democrats will fail as completely this november as they did the last time.

That's all too possible, unfortunately.  Like G-man said way back there, almost all incumbent ratings are down - Republican or Democrat.  And to regain control of the house and senate this year, Democrats have to defeat Republican incumbents in 5 out of the 6 open slots, while not losing any of their own incumbents.  While that's not impossible (especially since many of the open Republican slots are very, very shaky), it's a pretty tall order.

Frankly, if I were a Republican right now, I'd be praying that the Democrats took over something, because this administration desperately needs somebody they can use as a scapegoat, no matter how much they'd have to stretch it.  They're in a very, very bad position for their party - they hold all the power, but they're giving possibly the most incompetent performance in America's history.  And they have to own all of it, because there's nobody else to blame anymore.   That's going to be a very damaging stigma over the long term. They're trying to cover things with "everything's actually fine, move along, nothing to see here" cheerleading and propaganda, but it's starting to wear thin.   People aren't as placated by it anymore, and there's still at least 3 years to go.  All the Dems have to do is be smart enough to capitalize on that.  So far they haven't done a very good job of that, unfortunately...

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#49 DWF

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 10:00 AM

View PostGodeskian, on Feb 28 2006, 08:32 AM, said:

Incidentally, why aren't people putting pressure on their congressmen and woman and their senators and other elected officials to do something?

Well if we get rid of Bush that means that Cheney becomes President.  :eek4:
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#50 veganmom

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 11:43 AM

John Stewart had a really funny bit re. Cheney's numbers.

"4 out of 5 dentists surveyed recommend sugarless gum for their patients that chew gum."

That means the approval rating of sugar-filled gum among DENTISTS is higher than Cheney's approval rating in the US population.

For some reason I thought that was hysterical.

#51 Delvo

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 12:17 PM

View PostGodeskian, on Feb 28 2006, 08:32 AM, said:

Incidentally, why aren't people putting pressure on their congressmen and woman and their senators and other elected officials to do something?
Why do you assume they're not?

Edited by Delvo, 28 February 2006 - 12:17 PM.


#52 rponiarski

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 12:23 PM

View PostLin731, on Aug 28 2005, 08:09 PM, said:

Quote

I wonder how many of the poll-ees voted for Bush in November and are now kicking themselves because of it.


I want a bumper sticker that reads: Don't blame me, I didn't vote for him.

Reminds me of when Nixon was elected and we had bumperstickers saying "Don't Blame Me; I voted for McGovern".  :angel: Showing my age, I suppose... :D
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#53 Kosh

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 03:17 PM

View PostSpectacles, on Feb 28 2006, 07:06 AM, said:

CBS's latest poll has Bush with a 34% approval rating; Cheney is at 18%.

Anybody know how they compare to Nixon and Agnew?



Here's the link:

http://www.cbsnews.c...in1350874.shtml

Ah. Found an answer to my question. Nixon dropped down to 24% approval right before he resigned. So Bush is ten points higher than Nixon. Cheney, however, is another story. I don't know how his ratings compare to Agnew's, but it's pretty bad when your approval rating dips below Nixon's.


http://www.cbsnews.c...in1005327.shtml



Not very well, Nixion and Agnew had the curtesy to resign.
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#54 rponiarski

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 04:57 PM

View PostKosh, on Feb 28 2006, 03:17 PM, said:

Not very well, Nixion and Agnew had the curtesy to resign.

There was more courtesy all around in Washington back then. After the impeachment of Clinton and Bush's Iraq war, I doubt anyone is in a courtesous mood these days...
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#55 Godeskian

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 05:36 PM

View PostDelvo, on Feb 28 2006, 07:17 PM, said:

View PostGodeskian, on Feb 28 2006, 08:32 AM, said:

Incidentally, why aren't people putting pressure on their congressmen and woman and their senators and other elected officials to do something?
Why do you assume they're not?

Either they're not or they aren't doing so in a way that their congresspeople are taking notice of because nothing is being done.

No matter what Bush does, the rest of the goverment gives him a a free ride

Edited by Godeskian, 28 February 2006 - 05:37 PM.

Defy Gravity!


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#56 Spectacles

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 07:11 PM

View PostGodeskian, on Feb 28 2006, 05:36 PM, said:

View PostDelvo, on Feb 28 2006, 07:17 PM, said:

View PostGodeskian, on Feb 28 2006, 08:32 AM, said:

Incidentally, why aren't people putting pressure on their congressmen and woman and their senators and other elected officials to do something?
Why do you assume they're not?

Either they're not or they aren't doing so in a way that their congresspeople are taking notice of because nothing is being done.

No matter what Bush does, the rest of the goverment gives him a a free ride

It sure has looked that way, but lately more Republicans have begun to break ranks with the Bush Administration--midterm elections and all. Folks in the GOP are getting nervous because Bush's approval ratings have been low for some time, and now they seem to have dipped even lower. Whereas before, a slim majority of Americans viewed Bush as a straight-shootin', resolute kinda guy, that image has been tarnished by the CIA leak investigation, the abysmal response to the victims of Katrina, and his handling of the Dubai ports deal, where he's coming off as "resolute" about sticking to a business deal but iffy on security. And the Iraq War has proven to be just about the opposite of everything Bush claimed it would. Add to all that a crippling deficit and an economy that's very good for some but awfully soft for most, and the bloom is way off the rose.

Seeking to win favor with their constituents who are increasingly disenchanted with Bush, many Republicans are emboldened these days to point out the problems THEY see in this administration. And that's fine by me. As long as any criticism of Bush could be dismissed as motivated by Democratic partisanship, it didn't get very far. Bipartisan criticism is much more powerful--and it's growing.
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"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman

#57 offworlder

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 07:25 PM

The Honourable Opposition   
I was just reading a Telegraph report on Cameron's new blueprint for value for the Tories, trying to make some identity the voters can 'get', but gov supporters remark it looks like only marketing and shows no real differences, no clarity apart.

Now, in USA, can the honourable opposition show who and what they are? can they make a blueprint of values? can the Democratic Party set themselves apart as a real identifiable and understandable 'entity with identity' with separation, difference, improvement, clarity of self and purpose, constructiveness, and decisiveness - what they feel US of America really needs to be?
- an image, a hook, a logo, a catchphrase, a jingle, but which resonates with the substance and depth and values ............. the type of thing that made those not really up on everything but wanting a side they can believe in to vote for the Red State Bush tide back in 2004 ......... can the USA opposition party show us (or just decide for themselves in their own secret hearts) just what 'we' are or want to be? and make USA voters see it, believe in it, vote for it? Are they even trying?
- as Cameron is trying to do in UK

Edited by offworlder, 28 February 2006 - 07:45 PM.

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#58 Spectacles

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 04:30 PM

Holy cow!

The GOP is up in arms over this Dubai deal and how Bush has handled it thus far. (Notable exceptions are Frist and McCain, both of whom apparently think they need to kiss up to the Bush Administration to run in 08, which may prove to be a fatal miscalculation on both their parts.)

Anyway, the chair of the House Homeland Security committee, Peter King, has made it clear that he resents Bush's veto threat.

But Trent Lott--who must still be po'd about losing his Majority Leader status--came out really swinging.

http://www.huffingto...ok_n_16587.html

Quote

"I was offended," Sen. Trent Lott, Mississippi Republican, said of Mr. Bush's threat last week to veto legislation aimed at stopping the transfer of port operations to a company owned by the United Arab Emirates. He said Mr. Bush "threatened me before I even knew the details of what was involved or whether I was going to vote for the bill or not."
Mr. Lott said his immediate reaction was: "OK, big boy, I'll just vote to override your veto."
He called the White House, he said, to advise administration officials that they'd run afoul of some of their strongest allies in Congress.
"Don't threaten me like that again," said the former majority leader, recounting the conversation with an official he declined to name. "It doesn't make a difference if you're a Republican or a Democrat. Don't put your fist in my face. Where I'm from, we're willing to fight back."

:eek4:

Edited by Spectacles, 01 March 2006 - 04:30 PM.

"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman

#59 Kosh

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 04:41 PM

Frist came out against it as well. He wants some distance between him and the current administration. I think I'll get my CAT KILLER T-Shirt printed up.


I asked a local shop how much it would cost me to get a t-shirt printed that said "Clinton for President" and have a picture of George Clinton. It would be 150.00 dollars for one that looked like him. Pass.

View PostGodeskian, on Feb 28 2006, 05:36 PM, said:

View PostDelvo, on Feb 28 2006, 07:17 PM, said:

View PostGodeskian, on Feb 28 2006, 08:32 AM, said:

Incidentally, why aren't people putting pressure on their congressmen and woman and their senators and other elected officials to do something?
Why do you assume they're not?

Either they're not or they aren't doing so in a way that their congresspeople are taking notice of because nothing is being done.

No matter what Bush does, the rest of the goverment gives him a a free ride





The president has had a majority of his own party since he was first elected. They have backed him almost 100% up until the last few weeks. It's getting close to campaign time now, so we will hear a lot of people speaking up against him. 6 months ago, if you spoke out against Bush you were shouted down.
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#60 Spectacles

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 04:53 PM

Quote

Kosh: Frist came out against it as well. He wants some distance between him and the current administration.

Yeah, Frist spoke out against it at first, but in the past couple of days, someone must have twisted his arm or cut a deal because he flip-flopped and has been indicating that he thought the deal would proceed and there was nothing to worry about.





Quote

6 months ago, if you spoke out against Bush you were shouted down.

And now Bush has not only moderates in his party, like Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins, openly questioning his judgment, but so are conservatives like King and Lott.
"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman



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