Jump to content


Getting an "Insecure Connection" warning for Exisle? No worry

Details in this thread

Poverty Rate Rises to 12.7 Percent

Poverty Health Care 2005

  • Please log in to reply
48 replies to this topic

#41 mjtian

mjtian
  • Islander
  • 897 posts

Posted 03 September 2005 - 10:40 AM

Quote

And I am proof that the latest Unemployment figures are bogus... I'm one of those that has fallen through the cracks because I cannot collect unemployment. So in order to make sure I have food on the table, I have to apply for Welfare until I find a job...

I am currently living at the opposite end of the spectrum and let me tell you it SUCKS!

Indeed, the eonomy is NOT good at all.  My parents are small business owners and they have told me that our business NEVER recovered since 9/11!!!!  I agree all that unemployment stuff is bogus.  Its a lagging indicator in economic terms anyways and it indeed has many many holes!
"I have missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I have lost almost 300 games. On 26 occasions I have been entrusted to take the game winning shot... and missed. And I have failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why... I succeed" -Michael Jordan

#42 eloisel

eloisel

    Non-sequitur

  • Islander
  • 1,998 posts

Posted 03 September 2005 - 10:52 AM

Natolii, on Sep 3 2005, 03:32 PM, said:

Considering that when I was working, 1/3 of my paycheck went to Taxes, it will be shifting the tax burden unto the backs of those that can ill-afford it to begin with.

Think about that for a moment.

$1 Trillion dollars shifted unto the backs over everyone else.

And I am proof that the latest Unemployment figures are bogus... I'm one of those that has fallen through the cracks because I cannot collect unemployment. So in order to make sure I have food on the table, I have to apply for Welfare until I find a job...

I am currently living at the opposite end of the spectrum and let me tell you it SUCKS!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You must have had a pretty good income for 1/3rd to be going to federal income taxes.  I do fairly well and even without dependents pay a little under 1/4 of my income to federal income taxes.

I hope you don't live in Texas.  We've recently picked up 100,000 plus people who are jobless as well as homeless.  As many of those were poor to begin with or were made poor by Katrina and have nothing to go back to, many of them will stay and look for work here which means getting any kind of job is going to be very competitive.

#43 Natolii

Natolii
  • Islander
  • 1,246 posts

Posted 03 September 2005 - 11:12 AM

Not just Federal But State, Medicare, etc..

A biweekly Pay Check of $800 was only coming back with $600... 80+ hours per check.

Now given that I am a single parent, I lived paycheck to paycheck.
"I have on this board written pages and pages pointing out the science, and I will be dammed if I am going to attempt to reach closed minds that don’t even know how to use a reference library." -emsparks (Fenton E. Magill, dec. 1/25/07 - Love you Dad)

#44 eloisel

eloisel

    Non-sequitur

  • Islander
  • 1,998 posts

Posted 03 September 2005 - 11:25 AM

Natolii, on Sep 3 2005, 04:12 PM, said:

Not just Federal But State, Medicare, etc..

A biweekly Pay Check of $800 was only coming back with $600... 80+ hours per check.

Now given that I am a single parent, I lived paycheck to paycheck.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I feel for you.  I was a single parent for a long time too, with no child support and made a nickel too much to qualify for any assistance of any kind.  It isn't much consolation, I know, but it does get better.  You'll be so good at squeezing every penny that when your earning capacity improves you'll feel rich and you'll actually be able to amass a little bit of wealth without too much effort.  Fortunately for me I don't have state taxes but the medicare and hospital taxes get me along with the ever increasing property taxes.

Do you qualify for any job placement assistance at all?  Is there a Workforce Governing Board or Women's Center in the area that can help you?

#45 Natolii

Natolii
  • Islander
  • 1,246 posts

Posted 03 September 2005 - 11:48 AM

Right now I have my resume posted on Monster.com, with Unemployment and use the net to scan my local newspaper (saves me money by not having to purchase it). Unemployment denied my claim for monetary assistance, but I can still use their services... Not that I'm going to waste the gas going to the office when I can access said tools through my computer. Thus keeping at least the phone/internet on is a priority.

My mother lives in the apartment below mine and has been a big help.

Hades, my 10 yr old offered to give me her $5 to help out. So she knows it's tough.
"I have on this board written pages and pages pointing out the science, and I will be dammed if I am going to attempt to reach closed minds that don’t even know how to use a reference library." -emsparks (Fenton E. Magill, dec. 1/25/07 - Love you Dad)

#46 tennyson

tennyson
  • Islander
  • 6,173 posts

Posted 03 September 2005 - 12:30 PM

I don't know your total situation but if you live in any sort of major city have you considered taking part in a drug study? My experience with them was that while some inconvience was part of it the studies themselves pay between the mid hundreds to low thousands of dollars.  Another thing I've done is taken part in various types of medical and psychological research projects although those are available because this is a university city. Although I guess it doesn't work if you have no one to take care of children while you're doing them. But just a thought that might help from someone with no money.
"Only an idiot would fight a war on two fronts. Only the heir to the throne of the Kingdom of Idiots would fight a war on twelve fronts."

— Londo, "Ceremonies of Light and Dark" Babylon-5


#47 DWF

DWF

    Dr. Who 1963-89, 1996, 2005-

  • Islander
  • 48,287 posts

Posted 03 September 2005 - 04:26 PM

Things have gotten worse though.

http://news.yahoo.co..._unemployed_hk3

Quote

The jobless rate in the hurricane-ravaged Gulf Coast is expected to spike to 25 percent or higher, and when the long rebuilding process begins it's likely the same people the economy had left behind before the storm — the unemployed and working poor — will have the most trouble getting back on their feet.

Workers in flooded New Orleans, which faces major cleanup challenges, are taking the biggest hit.

"There's no question that the recovery is going to be much longer and more painful for the 28 percent of the local population in the New Orleans area living below the poverty line," said Liz Ann Sonders, chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab. "It's going to be much harder for the local economy to recover in the absence of resources and insurance."

Lives and livelihoods are in limbo, perhaps for a long time since it could take years to rebuild the city.

"It's just so devastating. You got to shore up the levees and get rid of the water before you can restore the necessities — electricity, water, sanitation, telecommunications. The engineering challenges faced will be gigantic," said Stuart Hoffman, chief economist at PNC Financial Services Group.

Rebuilding strategic oil facilities and ports will be a priority — eventually bringing people back to their jobs, Hoffman said.

But smaller Mom and Pop shops — and their workers — probably face a more precarious future. Some small businesses, restaurants and hotels likely won't reopen. Casinos built on barges along the coast that were damaged or destroyed probably will resume operations, though some uprooted casino workers may seek employment elsewhere, such as Las Vegas or Atlantic City.

"The populations in Louisiana and Mississippi are incredibly poor. Most of the damage was from flooding, which doesn't tend to be covered by insurance. That combination adds up to an incredibly long and painful rebuilding process_ I think five to 10 years," said Mark Vitner, senior economist at Wachovia.

Mississippi last year ranked the lowest among all 50 states in terms of per capita income, $24,650, according to the Commerce Department's Bureau of Economic Analysis. Louisiana was ranked No. 42, with per capita income of $27,581. Alabama placed 40th, with per capita income of $27,795. The nationwide per capita income last year was $32,937.

Poverty rates for the three states also are higher than the national average.

It's too early for any hard numbers on how many people have lost their jobs because of the hurricane.

Phil Hopkins, managing director of U.S. regional services for Global Insight, estimates at last a half-million people, while Rajeev Dhawan, director of the economic forecasting project at Georgia State University, said it may be 1 million.

The situation probably will propel area unemployment rates into double digits in coming months, even when accounting for employment gains from rebuilding efforts, Hopkins said.

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in the area of New Orleans, Metairie and Kenner was 4.9 percent in July, Hopkins said, based on his calculations. He said the jobless rate there could easily climb to 25 percent.

In the storm-slammed area of Gulfport and Biloxi, Miss., the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in July was 5.7 percent, Hopkins said. That rate could rise to around 20 percent or higher, he added.

"It's a pretty sizable impact. Commerce has come to a standstill in those counties that were hit," Hopkins said.

The unemployment rate for the United States as a whole was 5 percent in July.

To help ease the economic pain, the Department of Labor announced Friday that it is providing an emergency grant of up to $50 million to create 10,000 temporary cleanup and recovery jobs for displaced workers in Mississippi.

Though the affected communities account for a small slice of the United States' overall economic activity, the storm's economic impact is being felt by consumers and businesses around the country because the Gulf Coast region is an essential hub for oil and gas production and distribution. The area also is home to vital shipping and transportation links that allow grain and other goods to flow out of the country and coffee, bananas and other cargo to flow in.

The powerful and deadly Katrina — likely to be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history — has knocked out oil refineries, shuttered businesses and crippled the flow of commerce through ravaged ports, roads and railways.

On Capitol Hill, lawmakers are talking about ways to help out local economies. That includes the possibility of loans, loan guarantees or direct assistance to state and local governments in Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama, said House Majority Whip Roy Blunt, R-Mo.

"We also need to be looking at the long-term economic impact not just to the states affected, but to the economy of the entire region," Blunt said.

:(
The longest-running science fiction series: decadent, degenerate and rotten to the core. Power-mad conspirators, Daleks, Sontarans... Cybermen! They're still in the nursery compared to us. Fifty years of absolute fandom. That's what it takes to be really critical.

"Don't mistake a few fans bitching on the Internet for any kind of trend." - Keith R.A. DeCandido

#48 Spectacles

Spectacles
  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 9,632 posts

Posted 03 September 2005 - 04:30 PM

Quote

Eloisel: I do find the article interesting in that it points out how many wealthy people do not pay income taxes while not reporting the number of poor people who also do not pay income taxes.


Well, it would be downright outrageous if the article neglected to mention the number of poor people who don't pay taxes if its title was "Some Americans Don't Pay Taxes," but its title is "Nontaxpaying Affluent Grew By 15% in One Year."

Quote

Just a note, 27 cents on each dollar of income for a person with a $200,000 income is a $54,000 income tax bill.    This group of income earners accounted for 53.5% of all income taxes paid by Americans.  This is also a group that is least likely to benefit from many of the programs their tax dollars pay for.  Hmmm... is that anything akin to taxation without representation?

Oh, I think they have plenty of representation in D.C.. True, they don't benefit much from social security since it's a drop in the bucket to them. And they don't benefit much from education if they send their kids to private schools. But they sure benefit from taxes spent on defense and infrastructure. And since they are patrons of our representatives in the House and the Senate, their businesses and interests get nice slabs of pork each year--all funded by the taxes. Also, these days especially, their businesses are much freer to grow into monopolies, operate without union employees, and ignore environmental regulations. And in some cases, the taxpayers are even partially subsidizing their businesses, thanks to "privitization."

So all in all, I think they get a lot of bang for their bucks--especially the one in 400 or so who no longer pay any federal taxes.
"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman

#49 eloisel

eloisel

    Non-sequitur

  • Islander
  • 1,998 posts

Posted 03 September 2005 - 09:52 PM

Well, as usual, you are right Spectacles.  Forgive me.



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Poverty, Health Care, 2005

0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users