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Rita, The Aftermath

Natural Disasters Hurricane Rita 2005

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#41 Enkanowen

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 07:52 AM

Yeah, anyone who is within the path of this hurricane really, really should leave. It's potentially the biggest hurricane to ever hit Texas. 175mph by now, that's pretty crazy. They are saying it will be the third mos intensive hurricane in the Atlantic Basin on weather.com... so I dunno, I'd leave while I can.

#42 Tricia

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 08:04 AM

waterpanther, on Sep 22 2005, 12:24 PM, said:

Crawford is just outside Waco, not in West Texas.  It's within the cone of the projected eye path.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



My point not being exact location but addressing the comment about Crawford being wiped out and the joking about it....


Tho from where I am....it is west  :D and somewhat north too

Everyone must make their own decisions to evacuate or not...and yes, accomodations are being made for pets in order to get folks to leave the area.

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#43 Shalamar

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 08:48 AM

Quote

Galveston was already a virtual ghost town. The city's lone hospital was evacuated along with residents of a six-story retirement home.

The coastal city of 58,000 on an island 8 feet above sea level was nearly wiped off the map in 1900 when an unnamed hurricane killed between 6,000 and 12,000. It remains the nation's worst natural disaster.

City Manager Steve LeBlanc said the storm surge could reach 50 feet. Galveston is protected by a seawall that is only 17 feet tall.

"Not a good picture for us," LeBlanc said.

In Houston, the state's largest city and home to the highest concentration of Katrina refugees, geography makes evacuation particularly tricky. While many hurricane-prone cities are right on the coast, Houston is 60 miles inland, so a coastal suburban area of 2 million people must evacuate through a metropolitan area of 4 million people where the freeways are often clogged under the best of circumstances.

By late Wednesday, the blinking taillights of motorists headed north from Houston could be seen from planes landing at Houston's William P. Hobby Airport on the south side of the city. All routes leading north and west were jammed with vehicles.

I tried to go into work this morning- a tirp even in heavy traffic takes less than 25 minutes.  It took me over an hour to get home last night - and this morning It took an hour to get less than the quarter of the way and my gas situation and the fact that my engine was over heating ( and the a/c off ) forced me to pull off and let the car cool for a while. I've pretty much just gotten home, so work has no one there in customer service...oh well...

Getting out of here at this point  not likely- Like it's been said, Glaveston is 60 miles away and it's taking people nearly 12 hours to get from there to north Houston.

And for every thing around Houston I have heard that they are making it mandatory for any one in a mobile home, 'or any structure you believe might not survive high winds'.

Trikay You might want to get out of there, and I mean that most seriously- I know the modern construction methods are much better, and modern tie down is also much better but I don't think it's safe in a heavily wooded area.
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#44 emsparks

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 09:11 AM

When one is scared dark or black humor is more then acceptable, so if you got to make the joke make itÖ

Rite has wind speed between 170 and 175 mph, among worse storms of all times. If you can go by all means goÖ This Lady anít playing around neither should you.

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#45 Natolii

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 09:24 AM

Let's clarify the winds a bit...

Maximum sustained Winds are at 175 mph. But Gusts have been reported as high as 200 mph.

My friends in LA are worrying because it is turning north again. Forecasted path at this moment is right over Houston.

http://www.turnto10....cker/index.html

The current record for named storms is 1933 with 21 storms. So all this talk about global warming is just talk. It is part of a cycle and there is activity on the sun that is contributing.
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#46 Spectacles

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 09:34 AM

Hi Shal,

As much as I want you and Corwin to get the hell out, I understand. If I were faced with gridlock and uncertain of where to go that would accept my pets, I'd probably do what y'all are doing. If you think, though, that there is any risk, if there is any chance that your home won't withstand sustained winds of 100 mph, which is what they'll probably be in Houston if this thing doesnt' weaken, then right now is the time to get out. Given the massive population of that area, it might take two days just to get out of the storm's path. People who wait until tomorrow will be risking getting stuck in gridlock when the storm hits.

Let's all just hope that this damned thing weakens as it approaches the shore. Maybe if we all faced south and huffed and puffed.... :angry:
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#47 Spectacles

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 09:35 AM

Quote

Natolii: Forecasted path at this moment is right over Houston.

Damn.
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#48 Spectacles

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 09:37 AM

Trikay, it would be best to get out, like Shal says. Even if the strongest winds will die down before reaching you, this thing will probably spawn tornadoes.

Take care, and please keep us posted.
"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

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#49 Corwin

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 09:40 AM

We'll be fine... if maybe a bit wet.... hhhm... maybe we can get that new carpet out of the landlord that I've been wanting... :)

With everything going on, Shal and I are still in much better shape than a lot of other people that are staying in and around the area.  We will not get any storm surge and we have no windows to the south (all windows face north).  I am expecting some minor roof damage from wind and localized flooding which won't be near as bad as we went through with TS Allison.

As a precaution Shal and I will be taping the windows, then putting sheets over them and taping or nailing the sheets to the walls.  That will prevent pieces of glass from flying in uncontrolled.  We are set up okay with food in case the power goes out (I might get tired of eating ravioles out of the can)... but I don't anticipate being without power for more than 24 hours in this location.  Most of the power gridlines in our area are located underground for just this sort of reason.  Cable/internet connection may be a different story, so if you don't hear from us, don't worry too much.  

And I'm praying that we have cable and power until after Battlestar Galactica tomorrow night!!!!  I can forgive a lot, but I will be pissed if I miss the mid-season finale.....  

Corwin
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#50 Lord of the Sword

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 10:51 AM

trikay, on Sep 22 2005, 08:04 AM, said:

My point not being exact location but addressing the comment about Crawford being wiped out and the joking about it....


<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


My bad...didn't mean to ruffle feathers. I just thought it be ironic if Bush had his property destroyed by a storm...given the way he and FEMA dragged their feet with Katrina.
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#51 G1223

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 10:53 AM

Why are folks staying?
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#52 Spectacles

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 11:38 AM

G1223, on Sep 22 2005, 10:53 AM, said:

Why are folks staying?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Here's one reason:

http://www.cnn.com/2...rita/index.html

Quote

Houston resident Tim Conklin told CNN that he had been in bumper-to-bumper traffic for 13 hours and had only gotten about 48 miles. He said the drive to Dallas, where his father-in-law lives, usually only takes about four hours. (Watch Texas residents heed evacuation warnings -- 2:07)

On Highway 290, the main road between Houston and Austin, people were pushing their cars and minivans to save gas -- and were moving just as fast as the vehicles that were driving. Others were stopped on the side of the highway after breaking down or running out of gas.

Texas Department of Transportation spokesman Mark Cross told CNN that this is the first time that a mandatory evacuation has been issued for Houston -- a city of 3 million people. He said that traffic would be reversed on key roads leading into the city to speed the flow of traffic.

Remember how snarled traffic was when people were evacuating because of Katrina? Some Mississippi coastal residents tried to evacuate but turned back because they were afraid they'd be stuck out in the open when the storm hit.
Sadly, some of those same people are probably among the fatalities now.
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#53 Corwin

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 11:53 AM

One thing the report doesn't mention.....  Yes, there are over 3 million people inside Houston city limits... but there are about 5.5 million inside Harris County with another million or so in the outlaying areas.  The mandatory evac. is for the storm surge areas of Houston and Harris County, mostly the ship channel and south of the city.  That is in addition to mandatory evac. for Galveston, Brazoria and Liberty counties.  And there may be one or 2 other counties that I haven't really heard about yet.  As far as the size of Houston.... I'm on the SW side, still well within Houston city limits and I drive 55 miles one direction to work everyday and am just barely outside the city limits when I get there.

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#54 WildChildCait

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 11:53 AM

this may be a stupid question, and forgive me if it is but I don't live in hurricane or tornado country...

What are your chances of surviving a cat 5 hurricane if you are in a car stuck on the highway?
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#55 Corwin

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 12:03 PM

better than even..... the biggest problem with the winds is the debris associated with it.  We are only talking 165mph winds at the eye... I'm used to having sustained 90mph winds with gusts up to about 130mph in El Paso... yeah.. it's a huge sandstorm but some people are still out and driving around.

Of more concern is the rain.  If someone is trapped in a car in a low area, the waters can quickly either rise over the car or just push it off the road into ditches or whatever.  And it only takes 6 inches of water to do that.

Overall, People in cars out of the direct path of the storm in its full fury have a pretty good survival chance as long as they keep their heads.... of course, by then hopefully they will have had the sense not to get out in the storm anyway.  If they are leaving that late, then they are better off where they are.

Corwin
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#56 Shalamar

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 12:10 PM

There is a section of the I-10 and Beltway 8 ( also known as the Sam Houston Tollway ) where the surface street access roads do a huge dip- this interesction is notorious- many people have died by being down in the dip waiting at the traffic lights when the water rose- that is how suddenly the storm water can back up when the drainage system backs up/ over loads.

Unless you've experienced it for yourself, it's almost impossible to understand how much sheer force water can exert.
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#57 Nick

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 12:17 PM

You're safer in a car in gridlock during a hurricane than you would be in a low-lying coastal area, for sure.  The biggest risks are flooding, and if the car is in any sort of motion when the storm begins (i.e. driving thru rainbands :eek:) then there's the usual low-visibility (you and other drivers) slick roads, etc.

Cars can withstand most of the winds, it'll take a pretty mighty gust to pick one up or blow it over.  Debris hitting the vehicle and trees falling are also a concern . . . but the further inland and the higher the ground, the better your chances in ANY vehicle or structure.

-Nick

#58 Tricia

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 12:37 PM

I'm going to my brother's house...not that far away but an actual structure and not a mobile home...

I'm up close to Huntville which is about 80 something miles from Houston city limits...the northernmost limits...close to Lake Livingston.  I know how the runoff from a regular heavy rainstorm flows...or doesn't .... thru the subdivision.  Thus the reason --of course, add in the huge trees around me--I am heading for the hills.  Only just one down the road with family.  Brother lives on a big hill.


Going thru our tiny town this morning to TRY to pick up the prescription for my daughter's meds was an exercise in pure torture. Lil bitty town and too many people trying to get thru it to go to Crockett and wherever else new shelters are being opened.

Store crammed full of people and a long line at the pharmacy.  And still couldn't get  the child's meds as the insurance company for some reason suddenly needs an approval or something from the dr to them first and then he has to call the pharmacy.

I just got in the car and drove to his office and asked for samples as I was getting frustrated to the point of tears.  Okay...so I did start crying  :blush:

Anyhoo...will be heading to my brother's to ride the storm out  early early in the morning before it gets too bad with the weather or the traffic (hopefully)

In true dialogue, both sides are willing to change. --Thich Nhat Hanh


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Do not ask that your kids live up to your expectations.  Let your kids be who they are, and your expectations will be in breathless pursuit.


#59 Lin731

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 12:47 PM

Rita is back down to a category 4 (for what it's worth) as it heads into cooler waters but it's due to head back into warmer, deeper water shortly.
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#60 Shalamar

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 01:09 PM

Gld to hear that you are heading to high ground Trikay - I know that area fairly weel. My parents had a lake house right on Livingston just outside of Point Blank. Spent hours horsebackriding the back woods in my teens.

{{{Trikay }}} I understand your frustration.
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