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Judge gives man 60 days in jail

Crime Punishment

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#21 Rhea

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 08:08 PM

I'd love to know why the corrections dept. has decided he's not a risk for a repeat offense. Was this little girl really, really special and he would never be interested in any other 10-year-olds? And if she's 10 now, he's been raping her since she was 6!

Hanging's too good for anyone who would do this to a child.

Edited by Rhea, 05 January 2006 - 08:32 PM.

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#22 emsparks

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 08:23 PM

View PostSparkyCola, on Jan 5 2006, 06:47 PM, said:

emsparks ^ :love: I'm surprised that you would only have given him 5-10 years though :eh:

Ö

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I have to believe that there was some mitigating circumstance in the pre-sentencing report for the judge to be that lenient.

You have to understand that a child molester does hard time, in that if they are put in a prisonís general population  they usually wind up dead. General prison populations hate child molesters and rapist, big time. So as a rule, child molesters are put in special segregation units, which for all intensive purposes is permanent solitary confinement. Which does not always guarantee their physical safety.

Prison is not the country club most Americans think it is, itís a deadly serious dangerous place. It is a place where very often an inmate has to sell their body to a real deal killer type just to stay alive, and lives are bought and sold for as little as a pack of cigarettes. Which is why there is a very strong gang presents in most prisons in this country.
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#23 G1223

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 08:23 PM

View PostAnastashia, on Jan 5 2006, 06:27 PM, said:

I can't agree about going that way though G, that makes us no better than he is.

The unfortunate thing about the treatment option is that for this type of abuse the rate of repeat offense is supposedly very high even with treatment.

Actually we are not raping him over 4 years. Nor are we dragging his beating out over 4 years.  We would not be making him live the rest of his life dealing with the truama of rape. So killing him would be the best thing for the world.
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#24 Natolii

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 09:09 PM

I highly disagree with the "Not likely to repeat" assessment.

He's only been repeating it for 4 years!!!
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#25 Tricia

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 09:27 PM

View PostRhea, on Jan 6 2006, 01:08 AM, said:

I'd love to know why the corrections dept. has decided he's not a risk for a repeat offense. Was this little girl really, really special and he would never be interested in any other 10-year-olds? And if she's 10 now, he's been raping her since she was 6!

Hanging's too good for anyone who would do this to a child.


I'd really like to know how they judge the risk of a child molester/rapist repeating his crime.  What guidelines or psychological factors result in a result of them being at a low or greater risk to commit the crime again?

I don't have the statistics in front of me but I have read several times that the average (is there such a thing?) sex offender has approx. 100 victims before they are actually caught.  It might be higher or lower depending on each individual case but

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#26 Nonny

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 09:44 PM

View PostNatolii, on Jan 5 2006, 06:09 PM, said:

I highly disagree with the "Not likely to repeat" assessment.

He's only been repeating it for 4 years!!!
I can't imagine how "not likely to repeat" came out of "raped repeatedly for four years already."  :angry:  

As for spending the rest of her life dealing with the trauma, that's what the victim will be doing.  Those who spend their childhood suffering repeated sexual abuse tend to have severe problems in adulthood, but mental health care is not only not available to everyone who needs it, but is so highly stigmatized that many will not seek it or use it anyway.  :(  

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#27 The Tyrant

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 11:17 PM

Nah, don't kill him....sentence him to life....





















....as a eunuch. :)

#28 JchaosRS

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 01:03 AM

How extremely- peculiar. There is something very off here. I'm going to do some digging on this case instead of making a snap judgment.
There has to be a reason the judge doesn't think this man isn't likely to be a repeat offender.

Edited by Rommies Slave, 06 January 2006 - 01:05 AM.

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#29 WildChildCait

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 07:52 AM

not a repeat offender?! he's only being doing that for four years...pshah. there's some dodgy dealings going on there.

I hope he gets a bit of what he was dishing out, then maybe he'll know how it feels. I have NO sympathy for him.
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#30 Nonny

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 09:04 AM

View PostRommies Slave, on Jan 5 2006, 10:03 PM, said:

How extremely- peculiar. There is something very off here. I'm going to do some digging on this case instead of making a snap judgment.
There has to be a reason the judge doesn't think this man isn't likely to be a repeat offender.
While you're digging, check out the long tradition of Blame the Victim as regards rape, and No Really Means Yes, and all the rest of the fine old chestnuts that shift sympathy away from those who deserve it.  :suspect:  I have my own suspicions as to why so many judges and law enforcement persons relate to the perps rather than the victims.  :angry:  

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#31 Natolii

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 10:43 AM

http://jevant.blogspot.com/

Quote

The judge said he no longer believes in punishment and is more concerned about rehabilitation.

Prosecutors argued that confessed child-rapist Mark Hulett, 34, of Williston deserved at least eight years behind bars for repeatedly raping a littler girl countless times starting when she was seven.

But Judge Edward Cashman disagreed explaining that he no longer believes that punishment works.

"The one message I want to get through is that anger doesn't solve anything. It just corrodes your soul," said Judge Edward Cashman speaking to a packed Burlington courtroom. Most of the on-lookers were related to a young girl who was repeatedly raped by Mark Hulett who was in court to be sentenced.

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#32 Tricia

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 12:47 PM

You know...I wonder if this judge was appointed or if he is elected.  Because if he was elected...then come next election he  will be gone.


One factor this judge may want to think about is that perhaps prison might be the safest place for this...I can't call him a man....creature

If the family is outraged enough, this guy might not live too long after he gets out of prison

I'm not condoning vigilante behavior but 60 days is not long enough for the victim's family's rage to cool down.

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#33 Schmokie_Dragon

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 02:40 PM

Nah, dont call him a creature. Creature is a beautiful word. Call him man. This is the kinda thing humanity does to itself.
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#34 Aes Sedai

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 04:04 PM

I'm truly shocked. Something is seriously wrong with our legal system when a person who lies to authorities (Martha Stewart) gets 5 months in prison, plus house arrest; and somebody that does this only gets 60 days. How this can happen is just shocking.

#35 Rhea

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 06:53 PM

Here's a link to another story about this man:

http://www.burlingto...01050001&theme=

Quote

A Williston man who admitted repeatedly sexually assaulting a young girl for four years was sentenced Wednesday to spend 60 days in prison -- a punishment that angered the victim's family but was defended by the judge as the only way to provide counseling for the perpetrator.

Mark Hulett, 34, pleaded guilty in August to two counts of aggravated sexual assault and one charge of lewd and lascivious conduct with a child, all felonies. He faced up to life in prison on the charges.

The problem, agreed the judge and attorneys, was that the state Corrections Department decided it would not offer any sex-offender treatment for Hulett while he is in prison. The department determined that Hulett presents a low risk of committing a similar crime, and therefore he qualifies for counseling only after his release, lawyers said in court Wednesday.

Judge Edward Cashman's sentence, which he handed down after a two-hour hearing in Vermont District Court in Burlington, could incarcerate Hulett for the rest of his life if he fails to obtain counseling or otherwise follow instructions once he is freed in 60 days.

Judges lack authority under state law to order Corrections to provide treatment for incarcerated inmates, prosecutors said.

Hulett began sexually abusing the girl -- a friend's daughter -- when she was 6, and the conduct continued until the girl turned 10 in April, according to court papers and testimony Wednesday from the girl's relatives.

The Burlington Free Press does not name the victims of sexual assault and is not naming the girl's relatives to protect her identity.

Prosecutors wanted Hulett incarcerated for at least eight years, and in impassioned pleas the girl's family members asked for a stern sentence. Cashman, though, told the crowded courtroom that punishment was not his priority in sentencing Hulett, but rather finding treatment for the man to prevent future abuse.

"This is not a situation where I'm doing this for the family," he said. "My heart goes out to this family, and I would hate to be in the situation this family is. But there's other families out there, and there's other people who could be victimized, and I'm trying to take the long view."

Later, Cashman added that a lengthy prison term "will accomplish nothing but to harden this fellow."

The hearing was unusual at times as Cashman questioned witnesses, sparred verbally with Corrections officials, and at one point engaged in conversation with the victim's relatives as they sat in the gallery. The girl's aunt asked Cashman to impose a sentence of at least four years -- one for each year Hulett abused her niece.

"Mark should be taken off the street so it is not possible for her to cross his path," the woman said through sobs. "She will see Mark enough in her mind."

The Corrections Department's refusal to treat Hulett drew ire from prosecutors and the judge. Defense psychologist William Cunningham said Hulett showed little empathy for the harm he caused the girl and her family; regretted only "the loss of a friend;" and would require stringent supervision and dire consequences to comply with court orders, such as receiving counseling.

Prosecutor Nicole Andreson said punishment is a valid component of a sentence.

"This is not only about Mr. Hulett," Andreson said in arguing for an eight-year minimum. "To sentence him to any less demeans the level of trauma he has caused. To sentence him to any less will send a disturbing message of tolerance to the community."

Cashman disagreed, saying retribution "accomplishes nothing of value."

I also found a blurb in the same paper from the day he was arrested, which said a second man also assaulted the child with Hurlett's "permission."

I'm also stunned that this judge, with all the statistics available which indicate that sex offenders don't become rehabilitated and are always repeat offenders, would think that counseling would somehow fix him.

Edited by Rhea, 07 January 2006 - 02:55 AM.

The future is better than the past. Despite the crepehangers, romanticists, and anti-intellectuals, the world steadily grows better because the human mind, applying itself to environment, makes it better. With hands...with tools...with horse sense and science and engineering.
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Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen.  - RAH

#36 veganmom

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 07:13 PM

OK, here's the solution:
Put him in jail for 4 years with a sign on his back that says, "Rape me."

Given the known rate of recitivism for sexual assault...How do you think the parents and the child feel. And you're right -- it started when she was *6*??????

Here's another question: If the judge says he's low risk, does that mean he will NOT have to disclose his residence in the future as Megan's Law requires??? I think Megan's Law says the public can only know about medium- to high-risk offenders, although I'm not 100% sure...

RS, I'm all for hearing if you've found out anything to balance this story. But MAN. He's lucky it wasn't MY daughter.

Perhaps they can sue him in civil court. I bet a jury would award millions in punitive damages...

Edited to fix a SPELLING ERROR ARGH


OH RHEA OH OH OH
"I also found a blurb in the same paper from the day he was arrested, which said a second man also assaulted the child with Hurlett's 'permision.' "

Oh no.

OK, NOT blaming, just asking. How did this kid and adult get in this situation? Was he a sports coach? An assistant at the school? Someone who ran a business kids frequented? HOW did this happen? I think the only positive thing that can come of this is if we all learn just one more way to protect our kids....

Edited by veganmom, 06 January 2006 - 07:17 PM.


#37 Tricia

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 08:30 PM

View Postveganmom, on Jan 7 2006, 12:13 AM, said:

Here's another question: If the judge says he's low risk, does that mean he will NOT have to disclose his residence in the future as Megan's Law requires??? I think Megan's Law says the public can only know about medium- to high-risk offenders, although I'm not 100% sure...

The judge did not decide he was low risk to re-offend....the Vermont Department of Corrections did. Not sure how they determine that as he has re-offended continuously over the past four years.  



With the same child over and over.  Just because it was supposedly only the one child does not mean it was only ONE crime.  And how do we know it was only the one child....he isn't necessarily going to just volunteer that he was doing it to other kids too.


As to disclosing his residence in the future ...I would think that he would have to but I'm not sure....

Quote

OK, NOT blaming, just asking. How did this kid and adult get in this situation? Was he a sports coach? An assistant at the school? Someone who ran a business kids frequented? HOW did this happen? I think the only positive thing that can come of this is if we all learn just one more way to protect our kids....

The article Rhea quoted above says it was a friend's daughter.   So you have to be careful with your own friends too.  Truth is you get to the point where you don't know who if anybody you can trust with your kids

Edited by trikay, 06 January 2006 - 08:34 PM.

In true dialogue, both sides are willing to change. --Thich Nhat Hanh


You don't need to attend every argument you are invited to


Do not ask that your kids live up to your expectations.  Let your kids be who they are, and your expectations will be in breathless pursuit.


#38 SparkyCola

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 08:41 PM

Quote

I have to believe that there was some mitigating circumstance in the pre-sentencing report for the judge to be that lenient.

You have to understand that a child molester does hard time, in that if they are put in a prisonís general population they usually wind up dead. General prison populations hate child molesters and rapist, big time. So as a rule, child molesters are put in special segregation units, which for all intensive purposes is permanent solitary confinement. Which does not always guarantee their physical safety.

Prison is not the country club most Americans think it is, itís a deadly serious dangerous place. It is a place where very often an inmate has to sell their body to a real deal killer type just to stay alive, and lives are bought and sold for as little as a pack of cigarettes. Which is why there is a very strong gang presents in most prisons in this country.

ah, very true. Thanks :)

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#39 veganmom

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 08:57 PM

View PostNonny, on Jan 5 2006, 09:57 PM, said:

I've got a little list,
I've got a little list...
They'll none of them be missed,
They'll none of them be missed.


:)  

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Bet it's up your alley.  ;-)

#40 JchaosRS

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 11:37 PM

Okay, I can see the judge’s point, aiming for rehabilitation over punishment- but prison isn't solely a punishment, it also protects society from people who have no respect for the law or other people. We have prisons to separate people like Hulett who pose a serious risk to the safety and well being of the community.

The department's psych councilor that analyzed him said that Hulett had no sympathy and wasn't even sorry!! He knew what he was doing, he meant to do it, he planned to do, he did it repeatedly and he’s glad he did it. He doesn't regret any of the pain and suffering he has caused an innocent child.

It's because of people like Hullett that we have prisons in the first place.

I agree he needs treatment but give it to him while he’s behind four layers of concrete and iron bars away from any other children. The judge is well intentioned but what the hell is two months in jail going to do? He goes in, comes back out and is a free man. What if he doesn’t attend counseling? What if he takes off and goes to find another girl to repeatedly rape? What protection does the community have against this monster?

None. I honestly have zero clue as to why the Corrections Department couldn’t give Hulett treatment in prison where society would be safe. This is so ass backwards it’s insane!

Lock him up! Lock him up! What the hell is wrong with our justice system??

Edited by Rommies Slave, 06 January 2006 - 11:39 PM.

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