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Prison Making Him Crazy

Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph Prison Hardships 2006 Crime Terrorism

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#61 GiGi

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 11:37 AM

^ That is good info.  The CNN article I linked to said that some inmates are in solitary confinement for more than twenty years.  

I wonder if they are even bothering with the step down programs or if it is just easier to through prisoners in solitary and forget about it?

Here is another article I found - http://www.sonic.net...L/solitary.html

Quote

PICTURE LIVING IN A CAGE the size of your bathroom, with tiers of single cages above, below, and to either side. You remain in this cage nearly 24 hours a day, day in and day out, year in and year out. Ruchelle Magee lived under these conditions in California for more than 20 years. Russell Shoats has been living in various Pennsylvania isolation units for 17 years. Ojore Lutalo in the Management Control Unit (MCU) in New Jersey just began his 13th year living in extended isolation--and he has never been charged with an infraction.

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#62 Mark

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 11:42 AM

Mark:  :crazy: That's enough for me to try and stay out of trouble. No need to threaten me with death!  :unsure:
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#63 GiGi

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 11:45 AM

From a different article - http://www.npr.org/t...storyId=5582144

Quote

Isolation today means 23 hours a day in a concrete cell no bigger than a bathroom. One hour a day is spent alone in a concrete exercise pen, about the length and width of two cars.

Most inmates held in solitary have no contact with the outside world other than the U.S. mail. Depending on the state, inmates have limited access to visitors. Most can't watch television, call anyone on the phone or even touch another person while in the units.

Some inmates have been incarcerated in these conditions in U.S. prisons for more than 20 years. Most have been there for more than five years.

Inmates are put in isolation because of something they did on the inside. Prison officials say inmates are placed in isolation because they are the most violent, dangerous prisoners. Officials say most inmates in the units are members of gangs that are making their prisons too risky for the officers and the other inmates. But over the years, the violence rates in U.S. prisons have not decreased, nor has the strength of the gangs.

In many states, inmates held in solitary confinement have almost no way out. Many stay in isolation until their sentences run out. And that's pretty common. Almost 95 percent of the inmates in isolation in this country will be released back to the public one day. Many of them will receive little, if any, help with the transition. Texas, for example, took 1,458 inmates out of isolation in 2005, walked them to the prison's gates and took the handcuffs off.

A few states are trying to implement programs to help inmates work their way out of isolation. Several states, including Oregon and Colorado, have started a system that allows inmates to earn back privileges with good behavior and eventually work their way out of isolation. Oregon also offers inmates therapy sessions with a visiting psychologist to work on anger management. And a dozen states now rely on a panel of prison officials outside the prison to decide who goes into isolation and who gets out, so it's no longer solely at the discretion of the warden.

Edited by GiGi, 14 December 2006 - 11:46 AM.

"Life is as dear to a mute creature as it is to man. Just as one wants happiness and fears pain, just as one wants to live and not die, so do all creatures." -- HH The Dalai Lama

#64 Lord of the Sword

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 03:08 PM

View PostGiGi, on Dec 14 2006, 11:45 AM, said:

Most can't watch television, call anyone on the phone or even touch another person while in the units.

Apparently different Supermax prisons have different rules, cause according to the Wikipedia, the one where Rudolph is in allows them a radio and small black and white TV.

From the articles you've posted, yes...it sounds harsh, and even with a radio and small TV...it probably is very harsh...But, prisons aren't designed to coddle and cater to the prisoners.
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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Olympics bomber, Eric Rudolph, Prison, Hardships, 2006, Crime, Terrorism

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