Jump to content


Getting an "Insecure Connection" warning for Exisle? No worry

Details in this thread

13,000 Arab Illegal Immigrants to be Deported

Immigration Middle East Illegals

  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Rov Judicata

Rov Judicata

    Crassly Irresponsible and Indifferent

  • Islander
  • 15,720 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 10:04 AM

http://www.iht.com/articles/98889.html


Quote

WASHINGTON More than 13,000 of the Arab and Muslim men who came forward this year to register with immigration authorities - roughly 16 percent of the total - may now face deportation, government officials say.
.
Only a handful have been linked to terrorism. But of the 82,000 who registered, more than 13,000 have been found to be living in the United States illegally, the officials say.
.
Many had hoped to win leniency by registering and demonstrating their willingness to cooperate with the government's campaign against terror. The men were not promised special treatment, however, and officials believe most of them will be expelled in what is likely to be the largest wave of deportations after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
.
The government has initiated deportation proceedings, and in immigrant communities across the country, an exodus has already begun.
.
Quietly, the fabric of their neighborhoods is thinning. Families are packing up, and some are splitting up. Rather than come forward and risk deportation, an unknowable number of immigrants have burrowed deeper underground. Others have simply left - for Canada or for home.
.
For decades, illegal immigrants have flourished in plain view because officials lacked the staff, resources and political will to deport them. But since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the government has been detaining and deporting illegal immigrants from countries considered breeding grounds for terrorists.
.
"There's been a major shift in our priorities," said Jim Chaparro, acting director for interior enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security, which has subsumed the old immigration service.
.
"We need to focus our enforcement efforts on the biggest threats," he added. "People may not like that strategy, but that is what we need to do. If a loophole can be exploited by an immigrant, it can also be exploited by a terrorist."
.
Advocates for immigrants warn that the administration's sweeping reorientation of law enforcement toward terrorism prevention can be abused by government officials.
.
They note that, though it did not deal directly with the registration program, an internal Justice Department report was released last week that was deeply critical of the government's roundup of illegal immigrants after Sept. 11, 2001. Senior officials were found to have repeatedly ignored calls from immigration officials to distinguish quickly between the innocent and the guilty. As a result, many people who had no ties to terrorism were jailed unnecessarily, the report said. Advocates for immigrants have also accused officials of practicing selective enforcement by targeting illegal immigrants from Arab and Muslim countries.
.
"What the government is doing is very aggressively targeting particular nationalities for enforcement of immigration law," said Lucas Guttentag, director of the immigrants' rights project at the American Civil Liberties Union. "The identical violation committed by, say, a Mexican immigrant is not enforced in the same way." Some of those facing deportation have waited months or years for officials to process applications to legalize their status. Immigration lawyers say these men are illegal only because of the government's inefficiency.
.
Even before the registration program began early this year, the government had deported hundreds of illegal immigrants in its effort to prevent, and not simply respond to, terrorist attacks.
.
Officials say more than 600 Arab and Muslim illegal immigrants were deported during the first wave of expulsions after Sept. 11. But the Justice Department stopped releasing figures after the number of arrested immigrants surged to 1,200, and officials have declined to give complete statistics for that period.
.
Another wave of deportations began last year after officials announced that they planned to find and arrest illegal immigrants who pose security threats and already have deportation orders. Of that group, more than 3,000 people have been arrested. Officials say they cannot know how many of those Arab and Muslim men have been deported.
.
But it is the special registration program - which required noncitizens from 25 Arab and Muslim countries to register with the government from December and through April - that seems likely to produce the largest number of expulsions. Officials acknowledged that most of the Arab and Muslim immigrants swept up in counterterrorism sweeps have no ties to terrorist groups. Of the 82,000 men who showed up at immigration offices, and tens of thousands more screened at airports and border crossings over the past six months, 11 have had links to terrorism.
.
In all, deportations of illegal immigrants from Asian and African countries have surged by nearly 27 percent in the last two years. The number of Pakistani, Jordanian, Lebanese and Moroccan immigrants deported during that time has doubled, the statistics show. The number of Egyptians expelled has nearly tripled. WASHINGTON More than 13,000 of the Arab and Muslim men who came forward this year to register with immigration authorities - roughly 16 percent of the total - may now face deportation, government officials say.
.
Only a handful have been linked to terrorism. But of the 82,000 who registered, more than 13,000 have been found to be living in the United States illegally, the officials say.
.
Many had hoped to win leniency by registering and demonstrating their willingness to cooperate with the government's campaign against terror. The men were not promised special treatment, however, and officials believe most of them will be expelled in what is likely to be the largest wave of deportations after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
.
The government has initiated deportation proceedings, and in immigrant communities across the country, an exodus has already begun.
.
Quietly, the fabric of their neighborhoods is thinning. Families are packing up, and some are splitting up. Rather than come forward and risk deportation, an unknowable number of immigrants have burrowed deeper underground. Others have simply left - for Canada or for home.
.
For decades, illegal immigrants have flourished in plain view because officials lacked the staff, resources and political will to deport them. But since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the government has been detaining and deporting illegal immigrants from countries considered breeding grounds for terrorists.
.
"There's been a major shift in our priorities," said Jim Chaparro, acting director for interior enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security, which has subsumed the old immigration service.
.
"We need to focus our enforcement efforts on the biggest threats," he added. "People may not like that strategy, but that is what we need to do. If a loophole can be exploited by an immigrant, it can also be exploited by a terrorist."
.
Advocates for immigrants warn that the administration's sweeping reorientation of law enforcement toward terrorism prevention can be abused by government officials.
.
They note that, though it did not deal directly with the registration program, an internal Justice Department report was released last week that was deeply critical of the government's roundup of illegal immigrants after Sept. 11, 2001. Senior officials were found to have repeatedly ignored calls from immigration officials to distinguish quickly between the innocent and the guilty. As a result, many people who had no ties to terrorism were jailed unnecessarily, the report said. Advocates for immigrants have also accused officials of practicing selective enforcement by targeting illegal immigrants from Arab and Muslim countries.
.
"What the government is doing is very aggressively targeting particular nationalities for enforcement of immigration law," said Lucas Guttentag, director of the immigrants' rights project at the American Civil Liberties Union. "The identical violation committed by, say, a Mexican immigrant is not enforced in the same way." Some of those facing deportation have waited months or years for officials to process applications to legalize their status. Immigration lawyers say these men are illegal only because of the government's inefficiency.
.
Even before the registration program began early this year, the government had deported hundreds of illegal immigrants in its effort to prevent, and not simply respond to, terrorist attacks.
.
Officials say more than 600 Arab and Muslim illegal immigrants were deported during the first wave of expulsions after Sept. 11. But the Justice Department stopped releasing figures after the number of arrested immigrants surged to 1,200, and officials have declined to give complete statistics for that period.
.
Another wave of deportations began last year after officials announced that they planned to find and arrest illegal immigrants who pose security threats and already have deportation orders. Of that group, more than 3,000 people have been arrested. Officials say they cannot know how many of those Arab and Muslim men have been deported.
.
But it is the special registration program - which required noncitizens from 25 Arab and Muslim countries to register with the government from December and through April - that seems likely to produce the largest number of expulsions. Officials acknowledged that most of the Arab and Muslim immigrants swept up in counterterrorism sweeps have no ties to terrorist groups. Of the 82,000 men who showed up at immigration offices, and tens of thousands more screened at airports and border crossings over the past six months, 11 have had links to terrorism.
.
In all, deportations of illegal immigrants from Asian and African countries have surged by nearly 27 percent in the last two years. The number of Pakistani, Jordanian, Lebanese and Moroccan immigrants deported during that time has doubled, the statistics show. The number of Egyptians expelled has nearly tripled. WASHINGTON More than 13,000 of the Arab and Muslim men who came forward this year to register with immigration authorities - roughly 16 percent of the total - may now face deportation, government officials say.
.
Only a handful have been linked to terrorism. But of the 82,000 who registered, more than 13,000 have been found to be living in the United States illegally, the officials say.
.
Many had hoped to win leniency by registering and demonstrating their willingness to cooperate with the government's campaign against terror. The men were not promised special treatment, however, and officials believe most of them will be expelled in what is likely to be the largest wave of deportations after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
.
The government has initiated deportation proceedings, and in immigrant communities across the country, an exodus has already begun.
.
Quietly, the fabric of their neighborhoods is thinning. Families are packing up, and some are splitting up. Rather than come forward and risk deportation, an unknowable number of immigrants have burrowed deeper underground. Others have simply left - for Canada or for home.
.
For decades, illegal immigrants have flourished in plain view because officials lacked the staff, resources and political will to deport them. But since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the government has been detaining and deporting illegal immigrants from countries considered breeding grounds for terrorists.
.
"There's been a major shift in our priorities," said Jim Chaparro, acting director for interior enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security, which has subsumed the old immigration service.
.
"We need to focus our enforcement efforts on the biggest threats," he added. "People may not like that strategy, but that is what we need to do. If a loophole can be exploited by an immigrant, it can also be exploited by a terrorist."
.
Advocates for immigrants warn that the administration's sweeping reorientation of law enforcement toward terrorism prevention can be abused by government officials.
.
They note that, though it did not deal directly with the registration program, an internal Justice Department report was released last WASHINGTON More than 13,000 of the Arab and Muslim men who came forward this year to register with immigration authorities - roughly 16 percent of the total - may now face deportation, government officials say.
.
Only a handful have been linked to terrorism. But of the 82,000 who registered, more than 13,000 have been found to be living in the United States illegally, the officials say.
.
Many had hoped to win leniency by registering and demonstrating their willingness to cooperate with the government's campaign against terror. The men were not promised special treatment, however, and officials believe most of them will be expelled in what is likely to be the largest wave of deportations after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
.
The government has initiated deportation proceedings, and in immigrant communities across the country, an exodus has already begun.
.
Quietly, the fabric of their neighborhoods is thinning. Families are packing up, and some are splitting up. Rather than come forward and risk deportation, an unknowable number of immigrants have burrowed deeper underground. Others have simply left - for Canada or for home.
.
For decades, illegal immigrants have flourished in plain view because officials lacked the staff, resources and political will to deport them. But since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the government has been detaining and deporting illegal immigrants from countries considered breeding grounds for terrorists.
.
"There's been a major shift in our priorities," said Jim Chaparro, acting director for interior enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security, which has subsumed the old immigration service.
.
"We need to focus our enforcement efforts on the biggest threats," he added. "People may not like that strategy, but that is what we need to do. If a loophole can be exploited by an immigrant, it can also be exploited by a terrorist."
.
Advocates for immigrants warn that the administration's sweeping reorientation of law enforcement toward terrorism prevention can be abused by government officials.
.
They note that, though it did not deal directly with the registration program, an internal Justice Department report was released last week that was deeply critical of the government's roundup of illegal immigrants after Sept. 11, 2001. Senior officials were found to have repeatedly ignored calls from immigration officials to distinguish quickly between the innocent and the guilty. As a result, many people who had no ties to terrorism were jailed unnecessarily, the report said. Advocates for immigrants have also accused officials of practicing selective enforcement by targeting illegal immigrants from Arab and Muslim countries.
.
"What the government is doing is very aggressively targeting particular nationalities for enforcement of immigration law," said Lucas Guttentag, director of the immigrants' rights project at the American Civil Liberties Union. "The identical violation committed by, say, a Mexican immigrant is not enforced in the same way." Some of those facing deportation have waited months or years for officials to process applications to legalize their status. Immigration lawyers say these men are illegal only because of the government's inefficiency.
.
Even before the registration program began early this year, the government had deported hundreds of illegal immigrants in its effort to prevent, and not simply respond to, terrorist attacks.
.
Officials say more than 600 Arab and Muslim illegal immigrants were deported during the first wave of expulsions after Sept. 11. But the Justice Department stopped releasing figures after the number of arrested immigrants surged to 1,200, and officials have declined to give complete statistics for that period.
.
Another wave of deportations began last year after officials announced that they planned to find and arrest illegal immigrants who pose security threats and already have deportation orders. Of that group, more than 3,000 people have been arrested. Officials say they cannot know how many of those Arab and Muslim men have been deported.
.
But it is the special registration program - which required noncitizens from 25 Arab and Muslim countries to register with the government from December and through April - that seems likely to produce the largest number of expulsions. Officials acknowledged that most of the Arab and Muslim immigrants swept up in counterterrorism sweeps have no ties to terrorist groups. Of the 82,000 men who showed up at immigration offices, and tens of thousands more screened at airports and border crossings over the past six months, 11 have had links to terrorism.
.
In all, deportations of illegal immigrants from Asian and African countries have surged by nearly 27 percent in the last two years. The number of Pakistani, Jordanian, Lebanese and Moroccan immigrants deported during that time has doubled, the statistics show. The number of Egyptians expelled has nearly tripled.

< < Back to Start of Article WASHINGTON More than 13,000 of the Arab and Muslim men who came forward this year to register with immigration authorities - roughly 16 percent of the total - may now face deportation, government officials say.
.
Only a handful have been linked to terrorism. But of the 82,000 who registered, more than 13,000 have been found to be living in the United States illegally, the officials say.
.
Many had hoped to win leniency by registering and demonstrating their willingness to cooperate with the government's campaign against terror. The men were not promised special treatment, however, and officials believe most of them will be expelled in what is likely to be the largest wave of deportations after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
.
The government has initiated deportation proceedings, and in immigrant communities across the country, an exodus has already begun.
.
Quietly, the fabric of their neighborhoods is thinning. Families are packing up, and some are splitting up. Rather than come forward and risk deportation, an unknowable number of immigrants have burrowed deeper underground. Others have simply left - for Canada or for home.
.
For decades, illegal immigrants have flourished in plain view because officials lacked the staff, resources and political will to deport them. But since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the government has been detaining and deporting illegal immigrants from countries considered breeding grounds for terrorists.
.
"There's been a major shift in our priorities," said Jim Chaparro, acting director for interior enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security, which has subsumed the old immigration service.
.
"We need to focus our enforcement efforts on the biggest threats," he added. "People may not like that strategy, but that is what we need to do. If a loophole can be exploited by an immigrant, it can also be exploited by a terrorist."
.
Advocates for immigrants warn that the administration's sweeping reorientation of law enforcement toward terrorism prevention can be abused by government officials.
.
They note that, though it did not deal directly with the registration program, an internal Justice Department report was released last week that was deeply critical of the government's roundup of illegal immigrants after Sept. 11, 2001. Senior officials were found to have repeatedly ignored calls from immigration officials to distinguish quickly between the innocent and the guilty. As a result, many people who had no ties to terrorism were jailed unnecessarily, the report said. Advocates for immigrants have also accused officials of practicing selective enforcement by targeting illegal immigrants from Arab and Muslim countries.
.
"What the government is doing is very aggressively targeting particular nationalities for enforcement of immigration law," said Lucas Guttentag, director of the immigrants' rights project at the American Civil Liberties Union. "The identical violation committed by, say, a Mexican immigrant is not enforced in the same way." Some of those facing deportation have waited months or years for officials to process applications to legalize their status. Immigration lawyers say these men are illegal only because of the government's inefficiency.
.
Even before the registration program began early this year, the government had deported hundreds of illegal immigrants in its effort to prevent, and not simply respond to, terrorist attacks.
.
Officials say more than 600 Arab and Muslim illegal immigrants were deported during the first wave of expulsions after Sept. 11. But the Justice Department stopped releasing figures after the number of arrested immigrants surged to 1,200, and officials have declined to give complete statistics for that period.
.
Another wave of deportations began last year after officials announced that they planned to find and arrest illegal immigrants who pose security threats and already have deportation orders. Of that group, more than 3,000 people have been arrested. Officials say they cannot know how many of those Arab and Muslim men have been deported.
.
But it is the special registration program - which required noncitizens from 25 Arab and Muslim countries to register with the government from December and through April - that seems likely to produce the largest number of expulsions. Officials acknowledged that most of the Arab and Muslim immigrants swept up in counterterrorism sweeps have no ties to terrorist groups. Of the 82,000 men who showed up at immigration offices, and tens of thousands more screened at airports and border crossings over the past six months, 11 have had links to terrorism.
.
In all, deportations of illegal immigrants from Asian and African countries have surged by nearly 27 percent in the last two years. The number of Pakistani, Jordanian, Lebanese and Moroccan immigrants deported during that time has doubled, the statistics show. The number of Egyptians expelled has nearly tripled. WASHINGTON More than 13,000 of the Arab and Muslim men who came forward this year to register with immigration authorities - roughly 16 percent of the total - may now face deportation, government officials say.
.
Only a handful have been linked to terrorism. But of the 82,000 who registered, more than 13,000 have been found to be living in the United States illegally, the officials say.
.
Many had hoped to win leniency by registering and demonstrating their willingness to cooperate with the government's campaign against terror. The men were not promised special treatment, however, and officials believe most of them will be expelled in what is likely to be the largest wave of deportations after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
.
The government has initiated deportation proceedings, and in immigrant communities across the country, an exodus has already begun.
.
Quietly, the fabric of their neighborhoods is thinning. Families are packing up, and some are splitting up. Rather than come forward and risk deportation, an unknowable number of immigrants have burrowed deeper underground. Others have simply left - for Canada or for home.
.
For decades, illegal immigrants have flourished in plain view because officials lacked the staff, resources and political will to deport them. But since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the government has been detaining and deporting illegal immigrants from countries considered breeding grounds for terrorists.
.
"There's been a major shift in our priorities," said Jim Chaparro, acting director for interior enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security, which has subsumed the old immigration service.
.
"We need to focus our enforcement efforts on the biggest threats," he added. "People may not like that strategy, but that is what we need to do. If a loophole can be exploited by an immigrant, it can also be exploited by a terrorist."
.
Advocates for immigrants warn that the administration's sweeping reorientation of law enforcement toward terrorism prevention can be abused by government officials.
.
They note that, though it did not deal directly with the registration program, an internal Justice Department report was released last week that was deeply critical of the government's roundup of illegal immigrants after Sept. 11, 2001. Senior officials were found to have repeatedly ignored calls from immigration officials to distinguish quickly between the innocent and the guilty. As a result, many people who had no ties to terrorism were jailed unnecessarily, the report said. Advocates for immigrants have also accused officials of practicing selective enforcement by targeting illegal immigrants from Arab and Muslim countries.
.
"What the government is doing is very aggressively targeting particular nationalities for enforcement of immigration law," said Lucas Guttentag, director of the immigrants' rights project at the American Civil Liberties Union. "The identical violation committed by, say, a Mexican immigrant is not enforced in the same way." Some of those facing deportation have waited months or years for officials to process applications to legalize their status. Immigration lawyers say these men are illegal only because of the government's inefficiency.
.
Even before the registration program began early this year, the government had deported hundreds of illegal immigrants in its effort to prevent, and not simply respond to, terrorist attacks.
.
Officials say more than 600 Arab and Muslim illegal immigrants were deported during the first wave of expulsions after Sept. 11. But the Justice Department stopped releasing figures after the number of arrested immigrants surged to 1,200, and officials have declined to give complete statistics for that period.
.
Another wave of deportations began last year after officials announced that they planned to find and arrest illegal immigrants who pose security threats and already have deportation orders. Of that group, more than 3,000 people have been arrested. Officials say they cannot know how many of those Arab and Muslim men have been deported.
.
But it is the special registration program - which required noncitizens from 25 Arab and Muslim countries to register with the government from December and through April - that seems likely to produce the largest number of expulsions. Officials acknowledged that most of the Arab and Muslim immigrants swept up in counterterrorism sweeps have no ties to terrorist groups. Of the 82,000 men who showed up at immigration offices, and tens of thousands more screened at airports and border crossings over the past six months, 11 have had links to terrorism.
.
In all, deportations of illegal immigrants from Asian and African countries have surged by nearly 27 percent in the last two years. The number of Pakistani, Jordanian, Lebanese and Moroccan immigrants deported during that time has doubled, the statistics show. The number of Egyptians expelled has nearly tripled. WASHINGTON More than 13,000 of the Arab and Muslim men who came forward this year to register with immigration authorities - roughly 16 percent of the total - may now face deportation, government officials say.
.
Only a handful have been linked to terrorism. But of the 82,000 who registered, more than 13,000 have been found to be living in the United States illegally, the officials say.
.
Many had hoped to win leniency by registering and demonstrating their willingness to cooperate with the government's campaign against terror. The men were not promised special treatment, however, and officials believe most of them will be expelled in what is likely to be the largest wave of deportations after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
.
The government has initiated deportation proceedings, and in immigrant communities across the country, an exodus has already begun.
.
Quietly, the fabric of their neighborhoods is thinning. Families are packing up, and some are splitting up. Rather than come forward and risk deportation, an unknowable number of immigrants have burrowed deeper underground. Others have simply left - for Canada or for home.
.
For decades, illegal immigrants have flourished in plain view because officials lacked the staff, resources and political will to deport them. But since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the government has been detaining and deporting illegal immigrants from countries considered breeding grounds for terrorists.
.
"There's been a major shift in our priorities," said Jim Chaparro, acting director for interior enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security, which has subsumed the old immigration service.
.
"We need to focus our enforcement efforts on the biggest threats," he added. "People may not like that strategy, but that is what we need to do. If a loophole can be exploited by an immigrant, it can also be exploited by a terrorist."
.
Advocates for immigrants warn that the administration's sweeping reorientation of law enforcement toward terrorism prevention can be abused by government officials.
.
They note that, though it did not deal directly with the registration program, an internal Justice Department report was released last week that was deeply critical of the government's roundup of illegal immigrants after Sept. 11, 2001. Senior officials were found to have repeatedly ignored calls from immigration officials to distinguish quickly between the innocent and the guilty. As a result, many people who had no ties to terrorism were jailed unnecessarily, the report said. Advocates for immigrants have also accused officials of practicing selective enforcement by targeting illegal immigrants from Arab and Muslim countries.
.
"What the government is doing is very aggressively targeting particular nationalities for enforcement of immigration law," said Lucas Guttentag, director of the immigrants' rights project at the American Civil Liberties Union. "The identical violation committed by, say, a Mexican immigrant is not enforced in the same way." Some of those facing deportation have waited months or years for officials to process applications to legalize their status. Immigration lawyers say these men are illegal only because of the government's inefficiency.
.
Even before the registration program began early this year, the government had deported hundreds of illegal immigrants in its effort to prevent, and not simply respond to, terrorist attacks.
.
Officials say more than 600 Arab and Muslim illegal immigrants were deported during the first wave of expulsions after Sept. 11. But the Justice Department stopped releasing figures after the number of arrested immigrants surged to 1,200, and officials have declined to give complete statistics for that period.
.
Another wave of deportations began last year after officials announced that they planned to find and arrest illegal immigrants who pose security threats and already have deportation orders. Of that group, more than 3,000 people have been arrested. Officials say they cannot know how many of those Arab and Muslim men have been deported.
.
But it is the special registration program - which required noncitizens from 25 Arab and Muslim countries to register with the government from December and through April - that seems likely to produce the largest number of expulsions. Officials acknowledged that most of the Arab and Muslim immigrants swept up in counterterrorism sweeps have no ties to terrorist groups. Of the 82,000 men who showed up at immigration offices, and tens of thousands more screened at airports and border crossings over the past six months, 11 have had links to terrorism.

WASHINGTON More than 13,000 of the Arab and Muslim men who came forward this year to register with immigration authorities - roughly 16 percent of the total - may now face deportation, government officials say.
.
Only a handful have been linked to terrorism. But of the 82,000 who registered, more than 13,000 have been found to be living in the United States illegally, the officials say.
.
Many had hoped to win leniency by registering and demonstrating their willingness to cooperate with the government's campaign against terror. The men were not promised special treatment, however, and officials believe most of them will be expelled in what is likely to be the largest wave of deportations after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
.
The government has initiated deportation proceedings, and in immigrant communities across the country, an exodus has already begun.
.
Quietly, the fabric of their neighborhoods is thinning. Families are packing up, and some are splitting up. Rather than come forward and risk deportation, an unknowable number of immigrants have burrowed deeper underground. Others have simply left - for Canada or for home.
.
For decades, illegal immigrants have flourished in plain view because officials lacked the staff, resources and political will to deport them. But since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the government has been detaining and deporting illegal immigrants from countries considered breeding grounds for terrorists.
.
"There's been a major shift in our priorities," said Jim Chaparro, acting director for interior enforcement at the Department of Homeland Security, which has subsumed the old immigration service.
.
"We need to focus our enforcement efforts on the biggest threats," he added. "People may not like that strategy, but that is what we need to do. If a loophole can be exploited by an immigrant, it can also be exploited by a terrorist."
.
Advocates for immigrants warn that the administration's sweeping reorientation of law enforcement toward terrorism prevention can be abused by government officials.
.
They note that, though it did not deal directly with the registration program, an internal Justice Department report was released last week that was deeply critical of the government's roundup of illegal immigrants after Sept. 11, 2001. Senior officials were found to have repeatedly ignored calls from immigration officials to distinguish quickly between the innocent and the guilty. As a result, many people who had no ties to terrorism were jailed unnecessarily, the report said. Advocates for immigrants have also accused officials of practicing selective enforcement by targeting illegal immigrants from Arab and Muslim countries.
.
"What the government is doing is very aggressively targeting particular nationalities for enforcement of immigration law," said Lucas Guttentag, director of the immigrants' rights project at the American Civil Liberties Union. "The identical violation committed by, say, a Mexican immigrant is not enforced in the same way." Some of those facing deportation have waited months or years for officials to process applications to legalize their status. Immigration lawyers say these men are illegal only because of the government's inefficiency.
.
Even before the registration program began early this year, the government had deported hundreds of illegal immigrants in its effort to prevent, and not simply respond to, terrorist attacks.
.
Officials say more than 600 Arab and Muslim illegal immigrants were deported during the first wave of expulsions after Sept. 11. But the Justice Department stopped releasing figures after the number of arrested immigrants surged to 1,200, and officials have declined to give complete statistics for that period.
.
Another wave of deportations began last year after officials announced that they planned to find and arrest illegal immigrants who pose security threats and already have deportation orders. Of that group, more than 3,000 people have been arrested. Officials say they cannot know how many of those Arab and Muslim men have been deported.
.
But it is the special registration program - which required noncitizens from 25 Arab and Muslim countries to register with the government from December and through April - that seems likely to produce the largest number of expulsions. Officials acknowledged that most of the Arab and Muslim immigrants swept up in counterterrorism sweeps have no ties to terrorist groups. Of the 82,000 men who showed up at immigration offices, and tens of thousands more screened at airports and border crossings over the past six months, 11 have had links to terrorism.
.
In all, deportations of illegal immigrants from Asian and African countries have surged by nearly 27 percent in the last two years. The number of Pakistani, Jordanian, Lebanese and Moroccan immigrants deported during that time has doubled, the statistics show. The number of Egyptians expelled has nearly tripled.

*slaps around the poor interface the site has*.

I'll comment later. For now, discuss.
St. Louis must be destroyed!

Me: "I have a job and five credit cards and am looking into signing a two year lease.  THAT MAKES ME OLD."
Josh: "I don't have a job, I have ONE credit card, I'm stuck in a lease and I'm 28! My mom's basement IS ONE BAD DECISION AWAY!"
~~ Josh, winning the argument.

"Congress . . . shall include every idiot, lunatic, insane person, and person non compos mentis[.]" ~1 U.S.C. 1, selectively quoted for accuracy.

#2 Mary Rose

Mary Rose

    Charlie's Asthmatic Angel

  • Moderator
  • 22,357 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 10:13 AM

It's fair.  People should not be here illegally and if they want to try to come back legally that's fine.  Things are very different now and it's better to be safe then sorry.  Only after Sept 11 no one is really safe, are they?
Mary Rose, Official Missionary for the Church of Beka angst.  Please join us for worship at the EI fanfic board.  Jill-- on what my name badge should say.
Proud Andromeda and Forever Knight fanfic writer
    Posted Image           Posted Image           Posted Image
Proud parent of thriving Beka and Tracy muses
Posted Image

#3 Rov Judicata

Rov Judicata

    Crassly Irresponsible and Indifferent

  • Islander
  • 15,720 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 10:22 AM

Mary-- In principal, I agree with you.

However, the fact is, it's not because they're illegal immigrants; the government has an atrocious track record of enforcing immigration law. I think it's pretty clear it's because they're immigrants from axis of evil nations. That's not exactly sporting.

This is an extremely ambigious situation.
St. Louis must be destroyed!

Me: "I have a job and five credit cards and am looking into signing a two year lease.  THAT MAKES ME OLD."
Josh: "I don't have a job, I have ONE credit card, I'm stuck in a lease and I'm 28! My mom's basement IS ONE BAD DECISION AWAY!"
~~ Josh, winning the argument.

"Congress . . . shall include every idiot, lunatic, insane person, and person non compos mentis[.]" ~1 U.S.C. 1, selectively quoted for accuracy.

#4 bandit

bandit

    Bond, Fuzzy Bond

  • Islander
  • 1,026 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 10:39 AM

Quote

Only a handful have been linked to terrorism. But of the 82,000 who registered, more than 13,000 have been found to be living in the United States illegally, the officials say.
If they are living here illegally make them leave, all of them.
not just people from countries you do not trust.
if they are living here legally (as i beleve that quote indicates) it is a violoation of their constitutional rights to deport them without proof, and if you violote their constitutuional rights, you could find yourself in the next targeted group.

#5 Nikcara

Nikcara

    confused little imp

  • Islander
  • 3,500 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 10:56 AM

Quote

They note that, though it did not deal directly with the registration program, an internal Justice Department report was released last week that was deeply critical of the government's roundup of illegal immigrants after Sept. 11, 2001. Senior officials were found to have repeatedly ignored calls from immigration officials to distinguish quickly between the innocent and the guilty. As a result, many people who had no ties to terrorism were jailed unnecessarily, the report said. Advocates for immigrants have also accused officials of practicing selective enforcement by targeting illegal immigrants from Arab and Muslim countries.
.
"What the government is doing is very aggressively targeting particular nationalities for enforcement of immigration law," said Lucas Guttentag, director of the immigrants' rights project at the American Civil Liberties Union. "The identical violation committed by, say, a Mexican immigrant is not enforced in the same way." Some of those facing deportation have waited months or years for officials to process applications to legalize their status. Immigration lawyers say these men are illegal only because of the government's inefficiency.
Even before the registration program began early this year, the government had deported hundreds of illegal immigrants in its effort to prevent, and not simply respond to, terrorist attacks.
.
Officials say more than 600 Arab and Muslim illegal immigrants were deported during the first wave of expulsions after Sept. 11. But the Justice Department stopped releasing figures after the number of arrested immigrants surged to 1,200, and officials have declined to give complete statistics for that period.

It's racism.  Government regulated racism, but racism none the less.
Should everyone abide by the laws? Yes, of course, but selectivly applying laws isn't right either.  Refusing to let someone who's innocent go free because of their ethnicity is just as wrong if it's a Muslim, African-American, or anything else.

I'm going to stop before I start really ranting on the subject.
We have fourty million reasons for failure, but not a single excuse  -- Rudyard Kipling

Develop compassion for your enemies, that is genuine compassion.  Limited compassion cannot produce this altruism.  -- H. H. the Dalai Lama

#6 jon3831

jon3831

    Iolanthe's evil conservative twin

  • Islander
  • 2,601 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 11:05 AM

Hrm.... Interesting...

I'm all for deporting illegal aliens, and I think that the current immigration shortfalls are a prime source of danger from terrorists...

But hrm...

Quote

But it is the special registration program - which required noncitizens from 25 Arab and Muslim countries to register with the government from December and through April - that seems likely to produce the largest number of expulsions.

Two items:

1. Why not require all noncitizens to register?

2. Is this entrapment? You require all noncitizens to register, and then use those rolls to find people to deport...

Deporting 13,000 illegals isn't a bad thing, per se, but the way they're doing it is definately hrm-worthy...
"The issue is not war and peace, rather, how best to   preserve our freedom."
                    --General Russell E. Dougherty, USAF

WWCELeMD?

#7 ZipperInt

ZipperInt
  • Islander
  • 1,825 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 12:47 PM

If those that are to be deported are truly illegal, that is, they came to America illegally, haven't been paying taxes, etc., then by all means, deport them. However, if they are illegal because of government inefficiency in dealing with citizenship/VISA matters, then it isn't fair - these people are paying for the mistakes they could do nothing to prevent, and deporting them would be wrong.
The second greatest podcast in the history of ever:
http://geeksonaplain.blogspot.com/

#8 G1223

G1223

    The Blunt Object.

  • Dead account
  • 16,164 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 01:59 PM

So it's Racism to deport ILLEGAL aliens. So we should not have any border watch and what happens to those people who follow the rules of immigration who may have to spend money to LEGALLY enter this country while a few thousand of their countrymen enter ILLEGALLY?

To me I do not care if they are white black arab mexican eskimo.... if they come in illegally they need to be removed. They can explain their actions in court and that is where it can be argued.
If you encounter any Trolls. You really must not forget them.
And if you want to save these shores. For Pity sake Don't Trust them.
paraphrased from H. "Breaker" Morant

TANSTAAFL
If you voted for Obama then all the mistakes he makes are your fault and I will point this out to you every time he does mess up.

When the fall is all that remains. It matters a great deal.

All hail the clich's all emcompassing shadow.

My playing well with other's skill has been vastly overrated

Member of the Order of the Knigths of the Woeful Countance.

#9 Rhea

Rhea

  • Islander
  • 16,433 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 02:27 PM

Hey, wait  a minute! If they're going to start deporting illegal immigrants, I want them to come out here and start with the illegal Hispanic immigrants overwhelming California.  :glare:

No, it's not right - we have a lot bigger problems than a few illegal Arab immigrants.
The future is better than the past. Despite the crepehangers, romanticists, and anti-intellectuals, the world steadily grows better because the human mind, applying itself to environment, makes it better. With hands...with tools...with horse sense and science and engineering.
- Robert A. Heinlein

When I don’t understand, I have an unbearable itch to know why. - RAH


Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen.  - RAH

#10 Norville

Norville
  • Islander
  • 4,501 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 02:57 PM

Quote

Hey, wait a minute! If they're going to start deporting illegal immigrants, I want them to come out here and start with the illegal Hispanic immigrants overwhelming California.  :glare:

I agree entirely. Of course, they consider California to be their territory, illegally taken from them in the first place; I suppose they have a point. Of course again, I've been told it's prejudiced to call it what *they themselves* call it, "la Reconquista" (the reconquest, done by out-populating everyone else)... :wacko:
"The dew has fallen with a particularly sickening thud this morning."
- Marvin the Paranoid Android, "Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy"

Rules for Surviving an Autocracy
Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.
- Masha Gessen
http://www.nybooks.c...s-for-survival/

#11 Ogami

Ogami
  • Islander
  • 2,976 posts

Posted 10 June 2003 - 11:08 PM

I've heard of people from the UK that wait years to legally emigrate to our country. There's no favoritism or racism at play here.

Illegal means illegal.

-Ogami

#12 Rov Judicata

Rov Judicata

    Crassly Irresponsible and Indifferent

  • Islander
  • 15,720 posts

Posted 11 June 2003 - 02:32 AM

Rhea, on Jun 9 2003, 08:31 PM, said:

Hey, wait  a minute! If they're going to start deporting illegal immigrants, I want them to come out here and start with the illegal Hispanic immigrants overwhelming California.  :glare:
Totally agreed with the CA situation.

Quote

No, it's not right - we have a lot bigger problems than a few illegal Arab immigrants.

I find this part baffling. I'm still not sure how I feel about this apparent partially racially motivated deportation, but the argument that we have 'other stuff to do' doesn't pan. If the police get a call about a burglar, should their reply be... "Hang on. We have bigger problems to deal with. When we get the murderers and drug dealers, we'll start worrying about break-ins. Please call back."?

Obviously not. Having big stuff to take care of doesn't preclude us from dealing with the 'small' stuff.

And here's hoping they *do* follow up on this with other deportations. It shouldn't be that hard to come to my state or California and take round up a few... :blink:.
St. Louis must be destroyed!

Me: "I have a job and five credit cards and am looking into signing a two year lease.  THAT MAKES ME OLD."
Josh: "I don't have a job, I have ONE credit card, I'm stuck in a lease and I'm 28! My mom's basement IS ONE BAD DECISION AWAY!"
~~ Josh, winning the argument.

"Congress . . . shall include every idiot, lunatic, insane person, and person non compos mentis[.]" ~1 U.S.C. 1, selectively quoted for accuracy.

#13 Ogami

Ogami
  • Islander
  • 2,976 posts

Posted 11 June 2003 - 02:41 AM

They can't start deporting California's illegal immigrants. The democrats are busy registering entire towns worth of illegal immigrants to vote for their party. The dead, senile, and the illegal will vote, it's the Democrat way.

-Ogami

#14 Rov Judicata

Rov Judicata

    Crassly Irresponsible and Indifferent

  • Islander
  • 15,720 posts

Posted 11 June 2003 - 02:58 AM

:rolleyes:. Ogami, the failure to to enforce immigration law is bipartisan, as are 'odd' voting tactics.  Come on. Not everything is a demonic Democratic plot... this is just silly.
St. Louis must be destroyed!

Me: "I have a job and five credit cards and am looking into signing a two year lease.  THAT MAKES ME OLD."
Josh: "I don't have a job, I have ONE credit card, I'm stuck in a lease and I'm 28! My mom's basement IS ONE BAD DECISION AWAY!"
~~ Josh, winning the argument.

"Congress . . . shall include every idiot, lunatic, insane person, and person non compos mentis[.]" ~1 U.S.C. 1, selectively quoted for accuracy.

#15 G1223

G1223

    The Blunt Object.

  • Dead account
  • 16,164 posts

Posted 11 June 2003 - 03:12 AM

So since this is wrong we should let them stay? I mean ILLEGAL mean unlawful? Right?

AsI understand it the INS puts a number of folks back every day that comes from mexico. Yes a number get through but that means tightening up the border watch.at both borders.  Also Rhea if you know about Illegals and if they bother you that much then contact INS. Stop saying "If you are interested in enforcing the laws start here" and not mean it.

As I said before ILLEGAL means deportation after a full record of the ILLEGAL is made. That being fingerprints,photo record and dental record and then back over the wall like a catch and release fishing show.
If you encounter any Trolls. You really must not forget them.
And if you want to save these shores. For Pity sake Don't Trust them.
paraphrased from H. "Breaker" Morant

TANSTAAFL
If you voted for Obama then all the mistakes he makes are your fault and I will point this out to you every time he does mess up.

When the fall is all that remains. It matters a great deal.

All hail the clich's all emcompassing shadow.

My playing well with other's skill has been vastly overrated

Member of the Order of the Knigths of the Woeful Countance.

#16 Ogami

Ogami
  • Islander
  • 2,976 posts

Posted 11 June 2003 - 03:33 AM

Javert wrote:

Ogami, the failure to to enforce immigration law is bipartisan, as are 'odd' voting tactics. Come on. Not everything is a demonic Democratic plot... this is just silly.

No, I remember those propositions they had in California pertaining to illegal immigrants from Mexico. Why would the Democrats have fought so hard, for example, to extend social spending benefits to illegals? Compassion or self-interest? From their record of rigging the vote, of graveyards voting, of lining up nursing homes as "votes" for Democrats, I would say their motives are blatant.

-Ogami

#17 Rhea

Rhea

  • Islander
  • 16,433 posts

Posted 11 June 2003 - 05:25 AM

G1223, on Jun 10 2003, 09:16 AM, said:

So since this is wrong we should let them stay? I mean ILLEGAL mean unlawful? Right?

AsI understand it the INS puts a number of folks back every day that comes from mexico. Yes a number get through but that means tightening up the border watch.at both borders.  Also Rhea if you know about Illegals and if they bother you that much then contact INS. Stop saying "If you are interested in enforcing the laws start here" and not mean it.

As I said before ILLEGAL means deportation after a full record of the ILLEGAL is made. That being fingerprints,photo record and dental record and then back over the wall like a catch and release fishing show.
My feeling is that we either need to do one of two things - give everybody (known criminals/terrorists excepted) a green card and let them pay taxes too, or ship them all out - no exceptions.

Unfortunately, the cost of getting illegal Hispanics out of California would be prohibitive (there are literally *millions* of illegal immigrants in CA). Local law enforcement doesn't have the wherewithal to help out, and the Feds can't do a widescale sweep because it would cost too much.

My feeling is that if they're not going to get them out of here, they should make them legal so they can pay into the system. I think that should go for all illegal immigrants - it should be one or the other, and pronto.

I can tell you that where I live, about 1/3 of the eudcational resources are being used up by Hispanic immigrants, a good many of them illegal.  :eek2:  :eek2:

However, I don't think we should pretend that deportation of illegal Arab immigrants who have  cooperated fully with the government and AREN'T terrorists is anything but a kneejerk reaction to 9/11.

Edited by Rhea, 11 June 2003 - 05:26 AM.

The future is better than the past. Despite the crepehangers, romanticists, and anti-intellectuals, the world steadily grows better because the human mind, applying itself to environment, makes it better. With hands...with tools...with horse sense and science and engineering.
- Robert A. Heinlein

When I don’t understand, I have an unbearable itch to know why. - RAH


Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen.  - RAH

#18 Ro-Astarte

Ro-Astarte

    goddess of love and blowing things up

  • Islander
  • 3,842 posts

Posted 11 June 2003 - 10:12 AM

Ogami, on Jun 10 2003, 10:45 AM, said:

They can't start deporting California's illegal immigrants. The democrats are busy registering entire towns worth of illegal immigrants to vote for their party. The dead, senile, and the illegal will vote, it's the Democrat way.

-Ogami
Support that statement with some data, please.

Ro

#19 G1223

G1223

    The Blunt Object.

  • Dead account
  • 16,164 posts

Posted 11 June 2003 - 10:40 AM

And  of course the deportations of mexicans which does not make news for all we know there were 13,000 deportations of illegal Arabs and 30,000 deportations of illegals from Latin America(I do not claim any such numbers as being facts but the number might be higher or lower)

The article did not give any comparisonsto other ethnic groups
If you encounter any Trolls. You really must not forget them.
And if you want to save these shores. For Pity sake Don't Trust them.
paraphrased from H. "Breaker" Morant

TANSTAAFL
If you voted for Obama then all the mistakes he makes are your fault and I will point this out to you every time he does mess up.

When the fall is all that remains. It matters a great deal.

All hail the clich's all emcompassing shadow.

My playing well with other's skill has been vastly overrated

Member of the Order of the Knigths of the Woeful Countance.

#20 Ogami

Ogami
  • Islander
  • 2,976 posts

Posted 11 June 2003 - 11:57 AM

Ro-Astarte wrote:

Support that statement with some data, please.

http://www.rapidcity...ocal/news03.txt
http://www.foxnews.c...3,46841,00.html

That's about it, aside from blogs. Chicago Mayor Daley was famous for turning out entire graveyards to vote in the Kennedy/Nixon election. There were articles back during the Clinton/Dole election detailing how certain Democrat fundraisers were paid in bulk funds in order to "ensure" that entire nursing homes somehow voted for the proper candidate.

And as we saw in the 2000 election, many Gore supporters proudly stated that the law was no obstacle in the goal of preventing Bush from taking office. When it comes to Democrat voting, the ends justify the means. Legality is just a word for the losing side, apparently.

-Ogami



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Immigration, Middle East, Illegals

0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users