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What are you reading?


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#21 mare serenitatis

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Posted 30 May 2008 - 12:18 PM

I'm atm reading "good omens - the nice and accurate prophecies of Agnes Nutter, witch" by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

I am only half through with it, but it's quite amusing. It's got nothing to do with his diskworld series and is less of a satire and more of a novel (but it's still satirical enough)
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#22 SparkyCola

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Posted 30 May 2008 - 12:25 PM

Quote

Lindsey Davis's Marcus Didius Falco series

:happy: Paul, Nonny, excellent taste both of you! This series is one of my favourites :love:

Paul - may I enquire as to the first three on your list of historical Rome series?

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#23 Beldame

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 12:03 PM

Another Falco fan here. The new one used to be a summer treat for me every year but 'Alexandria' won't be out until 2009. I've just read Salman Rushdie's new novel The Enchantress of Florence which I enjoyed very much and that led me on the read A brief History of the Great Moghuls by Bamber Gascoigne to fill myself in a little on the period of the novel.
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#24 Paul

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 01:14 PM

View PostSparkyCola, on May 30 2008, 07:25 PM, said:

Paul - may I enquire as to the first three on your list of historical Rome series?

Sparky


Sure thing.

My first and alltime favorite has to be "Julian the Apostate" from Gore Vidal. It is simply a magnificent work. If you acquaint yourself with the actual sources and secondary literature you realize how many details he has managed to include. Julian is simply an astonishing work, a masterpiece which does not ignore/change history but goes along with it. What a fabulous book.

"I, Claudius" and "Claudius the God" by Robert Graves is the second. It's prose is excellent, but it gets bumped to second place because unlike Vidal, Graves does make historical errors. Also, some details are a bit too modern for my taste and it misses the philosophical edge "Julian" has. "Julian" offers two contradicting viewpoints to the main narrative almost every step of the way and is therefore almost like a philosophical discussion.

My third on the list are the "Roman legion" series by Simon Scarrow. It is a bit too much "We are the Romans and we are always kicking a$$", however the books are very much enjoyable and do not make too many historical errors (unlike the abomination that is sharpe).
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#25 Broph

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 07:23 PM

Just finished "Lullaby" by Chuck Palahniuk - the guy who wrote "Fight Club". If you can read it without finding out what it's about first - don't read the back cover.  There's a surprise at the beginning that is better if you don't know it first. I'm following it up with "Invisible Monsters".

#26 Nikcara

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 08:05 PM

Well, I've been getting into the Deathnote manga series, which is pretty good so far.  Last week I finished a Neil Gaiman book titled Coraline, and that was really good.  Today I finished the book Sway by Ori Brafman, and that was also really good.  I'm now getting ready to start a new book called Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me), which is a psych book about self-deception.  We'll see how that one goes.
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#27 FrostAbode

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 08:12 PM

Re-reading Asimov's Foundation Trilogy.  I haven't read it in years and thought this was a good time.

I think what got me back on it was remembering a psychology professor who thought it might be possible one day to predict human behavior with a good degree of certainty, and I recalled Asimov's plot device of psychohistory.

I liked this trilogy but didn't care much for the sequels that came afterwards.  Some things should be left alone.
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#28 SparkyCola

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 09:30 PM

I'm reading a Michael Crichton at the moment. The First Great Train Robbery. Nearly finished (I finished the Arabian Nights, they were awesome :love: )

Sometimes, like now during the exam time, I want something fast and light. It's perfect for that job :D It's also surprisingly quite an interesting book in terms of being set in 1855, it inspired me to briefly find out a little more about the Crimean war, Florence Nightingale (and therefore Mary Seacole) and other passing comments related to the time period.

In the past I've also enjoyed Michael Crichton's following novels: Prey, Airframe, Disclosure, and Rising Sun. So I know he's a safe bet.

He's very easy to read and informational in a trivia sort of way. Also, the chapters are REALLY short in this book, so I can catch snippets in between revision and while brushing my teeth and so on :D Call me shallow, but sometimes that's what you need. :blush:

Sparky

Edited by SparkyCola, 08 June 2008 - 09:31 PM.

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#29 Julianus

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 01:27 AM

View PostPaul, on Jun 7 2008, 06:14 PM, said:

View PostSparkyCola, on May 30 2008, 07:25 PM, said:

Paul - may I enquire as to the first three on your list of historical Rome series?

Sparky


Sure thing.

My first and alltime favorite has to be "Julian the Apostate" from Gore Vidal. It is simply a magnificent work. If you acquaint yourself with the actual sources and secondary literature you realize how many details he has managed to include. Julian is simply an astonishing work, a masterpiece which does not ignore/change history but goes along with it. What a fabulous book.

"I, Claudius" and "Claudius the God" by Robert Graves is the second. It's prose is excellent, but it gets bumped to second place because unlike Vidal, Graves does make historical errors. Also, some details are a bit too modern for my taste and it misses the philosophical edge "Julian" has. "Julian" offers two contradicting viewpoints to the main narrative almost every step of the way and is therefore almost like a philosophical discussion.

My third on the list are the "Roman legion" series by Simon Scarrow. It is a bit too much "We are the Romans and we are always kicking a$$", however the books are very much enjoyable and do not make too many historical errors (unlike the abomination that is sharpe).



Just have to heartily second Paul's  recommendation of Vidal's "Julian the Apostate." It is one of my all time favorite books,
Pax,
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#30 Balthamos

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 02:47 AM

Rereading The Dark Tower (all 7 of them) at the moment, fantastic book, recommended for anyone who likes low fantasy/western novels. Well written and utterly captivating.

Other works I'd recommend.

The Riftwar Saga - by Raymond E. Feist, Swords and Sorcery
Magician - My absolute favourite book
Silverthorn
A Darkness At Sethanon

The Black Magic Trilogy - by Trudi Canavan, Fantasy
The Magician's Guild
The Novice
The High Lord

Age Of The Five - by Trudi Canavan, Fantasy
Priestess Of The White
Last Of The Wilds
Voice Of The Gods

#31 Bad Wolf

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 04:10 PM

K I finished Dan Simmons "The Terror".  I highly recommend it.

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#32 Rov Judicata

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 10:46 AM

Bar study materials. :cry:.
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#33 SparkyCola

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 11:06 AM

Aww {{{{{{{{{Rov}}}}}}}}}}
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#34 Bad Wolf

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 02:28 PM

View PostEl Diablo Rovotico, on Jun 10 2008, 08:46 AM, said:

Bar study materials. :cry:.


Ewwwwwwwwwwwwww.

But when it's over and you've passed you're going to have SUCH fun in destroying the only books I think are worth destroying....;)

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#35 Nonny

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 09:41 PM

Just finished Janet Evanovich's new Stephanie Plum, Fearless Fourteen, and I'm still laughing about the potato cannons.    :lol:   I'll be heading to San Diego for her reading and signing on Saturday.   :happy:  

I'm looking forward to Robert Crais's new Elvis Cole, Chasing Darkness, out on July 1st.   :happy:
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#36 Mrs. Synystyr

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 10:19 PM

I just finished Lord Foul's Bane, book one of the Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever series by Stephen R. Donaldson. It's taken me many years of Mr. Synystyr suggesting I read it and now I know why. I enjoyed it very much and am now starting the next one in the series.

A friend and I are doing our own little book club and will be starting The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon soon.

Things I've been trying to get through for some time now are The Great Awakening by Jim Wallis and The Tao of Physics.  Wallis's book is about a social/political reawakening in th U.S. It's an interesting topic but not a fast read at all, at least not for me.

I have to say I loved reading I, Claudius and Claudius, the God.

One of my favorite books ever is The Agony and the Ecstasy by Irving Stone, it's a biographical fiction about Michaelangelo's life.

#37 Nonny

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 09:09 AM

I had the best time at the Fearless Fourteen event in San Diego Saturday!  Heading out in a few, so more later.    :)
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The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#38 Godeskian

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 12:13 PM

My brand spanking new D&D 4th edition manuals.

So many changes, but I think the people over on the WotC boards who are howling about 'the end of D&D' are really over-reacting.

In fact, while a lot of small details have changed in terms of character creation, it actually seems to be reasonably straightforward in how it plays. Even character creation is now really fast.

Now if only I had a group to play with :(

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#39 silverwind

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 01:10 PM

View PostGodeskian, on Jun 23 2008, 12:13 PM, said:

Now if only I had a group to play with :(
I can sympathise.  After playing two computer games heavily based off of D&D, I really want to try playing pen-and-paper D&D.  I can't seem to find any groups anywhere in this town, and I spent ages looking around online at various sites to see if I could locate one.  (It's a college town!  I refuse to believe the college is devoid of D&D players...)

Anyway, so far as reading is concerned, I'm about 3/4 of the way through "The Odyssey".  I still haven't figured out how I managed to get through high school and three years of college without reading it before.  I'm finding that I like the written Odysseus a lot more than the ones I've seen in movies and TV series.

Next up?  Um...either Anna Karinina by Tolstoy or Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.  We read some of Tolstoy's short stories in a class I took on Russian Literature, so I'm sort of looking forward to that one.  (The only thing I really got out of that class was a desire to avoid this one set of translators and the knowledge that I like Tolstoy a hell of a lot better than Dostoyevsky. :blink:)
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#40 Paul

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Posted 24 June 2008 - 09:15 AM

^If you really want to immerse yourself in an epic Tolstoi story, you have to read War and Peace.
"All Religions are equal and good, if only the people that practice them are honest people; and if Turks and heathens came and wanted to live here in this country, we would build them mosques and churches."
- Frederick II, King of Prussia, evil liberal™
~~~~~~
Cameron: "His wife arranged it for an anniversary present. And if you ask me, if two people really trust each other, a threesome once every seven years might actually help a marriage."
House: "Okay, I say we stop the DDX and discuss that comment."
~~~~~~
"Somebody came along and said 'liberal' means 'soft on crime, soft on drugs, soft on Communism, soft on defense, and we're gonna tax you back to the Stone Age because people shouldn't have to go to work if they don't want to.' And instead of saying, 'Well, excuse me, you right-wing, reactionary, xenophobic, homophobic, anti-education, anti-choice, pro-gun, Leave-it-to-Beaver trip back to the '50s,' we cowered in the corner and said, 'Please don't hurt me.' No more." - Bruno Gianelli


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