Jump to content


- - - - -

Dremell-Do You Own One?


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 23 May 2009 - 02:20 PM

I have a Dremell clone. It's good for grinding, drilling, and cutting through metal. What are your experiences?
Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#2 Shadowfire

Shadowfire

    I am a guy lol!!!

  • Dead account
  • 4,949 posts

Posted 23 May 2009 - 02:59 PM

They get HOOOOOOOOOT!

Wear gloves.

PROUD STUDENT OF SHEFFIELD HALLAM UNVERSITY

View PostRobL, on Jul 20 2009, 06:35 PM, said:

Every time I see a political thread I fondle myself just a little bit.............

'I honestly cannot justify that. You see, advertising isn't an art. Appealing to the English? Use someone from Hollyoaks and diss United. Scots? Talk about how evil Thatcher was. SNP is awesome etc. Americans? Well they be thick as sh*t so short sentences and shiny things and some Jesus helps too.. French and Germans? Talk about the war. Irish? f*ck that we can't sell sh*t in Ireland. That's frankly how it all works. So what I'm trying to say is that I'm happy you're dumping all this cash into advertising... I honestly don't see what you want me to do with it.  And also, that blip in the records in June was me buying monitors.-- never ask me to be 'brutally honest' about a budget.

You of course realise that anything you post here is comprised of ASCII characters? Each character is 7 bits with a parity bit making 8... I guess that's fairly meaningless to you which is actually the point. At most your sentence is a few kilobytes and considering I'm doing a file transfer of over a billion bytes right now those bytes making up your words are invisible with their insignificance, which is exact what I think of your post. Insignificant.

#3 Orpheus

Orpheus

    Get my agent! I'm supposed to be Castathan, not Indogene

  • Administrator
  • 16,932 posts

Posted 23 May 2009 - 03:00 PM

I only own two.  I got a fixed speed in 1976 (which changed my life) and a variable speed ca 1982. I consider them an essential for any workshop. I've many times considered getting a rechargable, but since those weren't available back when I first needed one, I built an inverter, which let me run them off a 12V battery (or alkalines in a pinch), and it's served me better. The DC motors in the rechargables simply were powerful enough for my needs

They both see regular use, and are in darn good condition today. They don't make 'em like t *that* anymore! Perhaps my biggest reason for getting one was to drill printed circuit boards (it was a giant purchase for me back then). I later added their 70s/80's drill press attachment (no longer made; I hear the current ones aren't as sturdy).  I have a third party "snake" for it, which I use frequently (I often put the Dremel and battery inverter on a belt and use it for portable functions with more versatility -- what else can drill through several consecutive stud  or floor joist compartments to pass cables?)

But of all the other Dremal gizmos I bought in the 1980s (saws and such), only the Moto-lathe (which few people would want) remains in my regular armory. The rest were either lost, or packed away and forgotten, long ago. Ironically, when I need a mini-table saw, scrollsaw, bandsaw, etc, I find that a 60s era *children's* power woodworking set that I got at a yard sale for my kids serves equally well. (I feel bad that I use it more than they did, but it scared their mother, who wisely demanded close supervision)

I hear the Stylus and Driver are good, but after decades of rigging my own attachments (waiting for Dremel to come out with them) they were no longer a temptation. I wanted the Multi-Max to be really good, because I was (and am) in the market for that class of oscillating tool, but the reviews weren't good enough to make me pull the trigger.  The router/cutter? I've made many jigs to fill that function, so I wasn't tempted (more on this elsewhere)

I'm afraid I haven't really followed the Dremel product lines for many years. What else do they have out now?

#4 D.Rabbit

D.Rabbit

    Me and all my shadows.

  • Islander
  • 6,015 posts

Posted 23 May 2009 - 04:31 PM

I've had several dremels, the first one I took back to the store, it didn't do what I wanted it to do back then.

The second, was from a yard sale, and even after I pulled it apart and did some alterations, it refused to function properly.

The one I bought recently was marketed as a golf club and cleat cleaning/polishing tool. Takes 4 AA batteries, (I use recharge ables)
When I spotted it at Value Village still sealed in the blister pack it made a quick dive to the bottom of my other purchases. I didn't want anyone lifting it out of my cart when I wasn't looking.

Dremel Model 760
You can get it cheaper if you search,
^this page has more information.
You can buy larger collects for it, so it's a very handy little pocket sized tool.
I keep mine just over my right shoulder on the window sill next to my desk.

I use it to grind down glass on chipped collectibles, repair stone sculptures, ream stone and pearl beads etc.
Good xyzt to you, = a web greeting that includes all time zones and planets.
-----------------
Posted Image

#5 Mark

Mark
  • Islander
  • 5,216 posts

Posted 24 May 2009 - 03:15 AM

Mark: I've had two. They're great for all sorts of things. Cutting through hardened steel, for instance.  :rolleyes:
Mark
Discussion is an exchange of knowledge: argument is an exchange of ignorance.
Peace is not the absence of conflict, but the ability to cope with it.
APOGEE MESSAGE BOARD

#6 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 24 May 2009 - 10:44 AM

Gorram computer farts!!!!!!!!!!!! P-U!!! :yucky:

Edited by Ghost Rider, 24 May 2009 - 10:47 AM.

Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#7 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 24 May 2009 - 10:46 AM

View PostOrpheus, on May 23 2009, 03:00 PM, said:

I only own two.  I got a fixed speed in 1976 (which changed my life) and a variable speed ca 1982. I consider them an essential for any workshop. I've many times considered getting a rechargable, but since those weren't available back when I first needed one, I built an inverter, which let me run them off a 12V battery (or alkalines in a pinch), and it's served me better. The DC motors in the rechargables simply were powerful enough for my needs.

Okay-now you've got me REALLY curious.

Could you post how you built this inverter?
Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#8 Orpheus

Orpheus

    Get my agent! I'm supposed to be Castathan, not Indogene

  • Administrator
  • 16,932 posts

Posted 24 May 2009 - 11:51 AM

Frankly, it rarely pays to build your own inverters these days, because they are so cheap and readily available. Just 20 years ago, most people didn't realize they existed (as consumer products). and I got a lot of "wow" just for having an AC outlet in my car. Sometime in the early-mid 90s, they started to be sold in larger numbers, but were pricey: US$150-$500 for ~100W, which would be $270-$1000 in today's dollars (depending on how you assess equivalence in disposable income), and the low-end units were temperamental and prone to early death. Today, you can find them for under $20 (but I still wouldn't rely on the low end ones for more than 1/2 their rated wattage, if that much. It's likely to be a peak wattage, and often optimistic. But hey, if you keep your eyes peeled, you can often find 200-500W units for $20-30 on sale, clearance or surplus).

I think the market for UPS and battery backups is responsible for the drop in price. In fact, the cheapest way to get a safe, light fully operational inverter system for many applications is to replace the battery in a dead low-end UPS or pick a new one up for $20-30. That way, you get, not just a UL-rated inverter, but a battery charger and battery, case, cord, etc. Technically, most UPSs should only be operated with a good ground (e.g. plugged into the wall) for safety,  but I have often used inexpensive low-power "power-strip" style battery backups as portable AC power supplies

I've always wanted to write an article on inverter design, so maybe I'll start a thread, taking the reader from simple to sophisticated designs. It would tie into a bunch of other threads (like the solar power thread) In the meantime, I should go back and add material to my "Stupid UPS tricks" thread

There are three major catches with portable power supplies: power quality, battery capacity and efficiency. A Dremel hand tool isn't very sensitive to power quality (certainly not as sensitive as a computer!) but may run a little hotter on squarewave or so-called "modified sine wave" AC. As far as power, mine  is rated for 1.15A @ 120VAC, which would be 11.5A @12VDC, but it probably wouldn't draw that in most operations. For comparison, perhaps the commonest "size of" 12VDC SLA (sealed lead-acid, a very safe style of high power consumer battery, as long as you don't short it out) is rated for 7 Amp-hours, which would run a Dremel at its full rated load for

Hmmm... do you mind if I hijack this  thread a little bit with some experiments? The scientist in me gots ta know -- in fact it could be a good opportunity to start a new feature that I have always meant to add to the Tinker's Corner: a remote lab, where TC'ers could conduct or monitor experiments from the comfort of their own computers. I recently stumbled over some of the equipment I'd set aside for this, and it's mocking me.

In the meantime, carry on with your conversations.

Edited by Orpheus, 24 May 2009 - 12:16 PM.
changed blue paragraph


#9 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 24 May 2009 - 12:02 PM

Quote

Hmmm... do you mind if I hijack this thread a little bit with some experiments? It's the scientist in me. In the meantime carry on with your conversations.

By all means, Professor. :cool:
Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#10 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 24 October 2009 - 12:13 PM

Here's mine. I'm thinking about buying a case of assorted Dremell bits/wheel cutters to use with this. I'm sure they would work.

Attached Images

  • MVC_001F.JPG
  • MVC_003F.JPG

Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#11 D.Rabbit

D.Rabbit

    Me and all my shadows.

  • Islander
  • 6,015 posts

Posted 24 October 2009 - 12:37 PM

Nice but I still prefer my cordless golf cleat cleaner, I can hold it like a pencil underhand over hand it's much more versatile then the gun grip models, that is unless you need the grip to rest you chin on?

#12 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 24 October 2009 - 12:43 PM

Bunny,

I'd like to get a cordless version as well.
Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#13 Orpheus

Orpheus

    Get my agent! I'm supposed to be Castathan, not Indogene

  • Administrator
  • 16,932 posts

Posted 24 October 2009 - 02:37 PM

I suggest you find out what size collet you have. In fact, I suggest you get a kit of collets, pin vises, and mandrels. Without them, you may find that you can't mount a lot of bits, even your manufacturer's own bits, on your rotary tool.  

Dremels own collets, mandrels, etc. are quite expensive, but aren't precision parts, so I suggest getting a set on eBay. A set costs just a coupe of dollars more than than an individual collet. and a set of collets, pin chucks, mandrels, etc. is just a few dollars above that. eBay S&H costs (almost) as much as the parts do. You can also get them as part of a large bit assortment, but those large sets are often cheaply made (e.g. grinding bits that immediately wear down, a few collets, parts counts inflated by dozens of cutting wheels that are so brittle that they fly apart) You generally get better quality better buying bits in related sets (e.g. assorted grinding burrs only, or drill bits only) This is especially true if you have a genuine Dremel, which spins considerably faster (25,000-30,000 RPM) than many other roto-tools
q.jpg
COLLET:  As you know, roto-tool bits are held by a nut that screws onto a threaded spinning shaft. You may not notice (or think about) a third part that sits between them, called a collet. It's basically a hollow tube with a thickened end, usually slit four ways for expansion. The collet is what actually grips your bit. The nut is tapered on the inside, to squeeze the collet, so together they form a crude drill chuck. Common collet sizes are 1/32", 1/16", 3/32 and 1/8" (= 1/32, 2/32, 3/32, 4/32 -- they like "simplifying the fraction" even if it is a false simplicity). The collet size is the shank (bit stem) it will take. I use the 1/32 and 1/16th a lot for drilling holes for micro-electronics (my original primary use as a kid) but you may find the 3/32 or even 1/8" more suited to your needs. The 1/8th often needs a different nut with a larger opening.

Mandrels (sometimes called arbors) are a special type of bit that holds a disposable end. Cutting disks, for example (one of a Dremel's most useful tools, IMHO) are held by a stem mandrel with a tiny screw on the end. Some grinding or wire brush wheels are held in a similar stem mandrel, with a longer screw to accommodate the wheel's greater thickness (vs. a disk). Sanding disks (which I don't find very useful) may need a mandrel with a stiff (or rubber) backing disk, though some of Dremel's own sanding disks use a stiff paper that gets stiffer under speed. Other mandrels (not pictured) include ones with an embossed diamond (for more "grip" on diamond embossed disposable ends), tapered screw mandrels (to 'bite into' felt polishing pads), drum mandrels (to hold sandpaper cylinders), etc. You won't need these as much, but it's worth browsing the bit collections at your local hardware stores for ideas. The stem mandrels with a screw on the end (pictured)  can fool you, because you can't see the differing diameters and lengths of the screw that holds the actual disk (or whatever) and which should match the hole in the disk (or whatever) that it holds.

Pin vise chucks: Here I make a distinction that Dremel doesn't. because I often use third party jeweler tools that fit a Dremel. I use the term "pin vise" if it has a bit shank that fits in a collet, and "pin chuck" if it screws directly onto a roto-tool's threaded shaft, in lieu of a collet/nut (and must have the right diameter and thread for your threaded shaft).

Both of the above work like tiny variable drill chucks, just like he ones on your larger drills. They are useful when the workpiece itself must be held (e.g. imagine you are removing the rust from, or sharpening, a drill bit: it's better to spin the target workpiece against a piece of sandpaper than to clamp it still and try to grind it perfectly uniformly on all sides). I also use them to hold improvised bits: a finish nail centered in a pin vise or chuck, for example, is much better than a drill bit for drilling holes in most plastics, because plastic can melt and clog a drill bit.

Gooseneck or flexible shaft: (not pictured_ This is actually a whole 'nuther beast than any of the above -- a major add-on that costs $20-30, but like a pin chuck, it screws onto the threaded shaft in lieu of a nut/collet. It has a flexible spinning shaft inside a spiral metal sheath, often about a yard long, terminating in a pencil-like chuck. Usually you hang your tool (and the excess flexible shaft) on a hook over your work area, and use the pencil end as a micro-dremel. It's much easier to maneuver than the bulky moto-tool itself. You don't need one up front, but keep it in mind if you use your Dremel much. It's more precise and much less fatiguing.

Some form of rough speed control is important for good Dremel work. The speed control on the tool itself (if any) is fine: the speed should match the bit and the job (basically highest/high/med/low), and varying tip pressure is usually easier than trying to make fine speed adjustments as you work, but if you have a fixed-speed tool, a  sewing machine pedal works, and I will be doing a separate thread on other inexpensive motor speed controls. (I have the pictures and oscilloscope shots done, I just have to get around to doing the text)

Edited by Orpheus, 25 October 2009 - 06:16 AM.
Typos! We haz them!


#14 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 24 October 2009 - 06:14 PM

Thanks for the info, Orph. :cool:

I'm going to bookmark this thread for reference. :cool:
Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#15 Orpheus

Orpheus

    Get my agent! I'm supposed to be Castathan, not Indogene

  • Administrator
  • 16,932 posts

Posted 25 October 2009 - 12:40 PM

Ironically, having recommended buying a bunch of *bit holders*, I don't recommend buying a ton of different bits.

I've gone that route over the years, partly because the assortments seem so much cheaper and more versatile than individual bits, but I've found that 80-90% of the bits are mostly useful as second or third best choices when the "right bit" gets dull or breaks.

For example, I almost always use one of three drill bit sizes, and I don't even know exactly what they are anymore. I just know which one I want for a given job. For holes over 1/8", I usually prefer to use a regular drill or press.

For most Printed Circuit Board drilling I use 3/64" (1.12 mm): it leaves enough room for solder to flow easily around thicker leads (e.g. 1/2W resistors) but is small enough for almost any other component. Anything too much smaller than 3/64th is prone to break at higher speeds with hand-held wobble or even the newer Dremel drill-press attachments (which aren't nearly as sturdy as the old ones). I got a box of 100 factory-used bits for free 10 years ago, which may last the rest of my life. (Factories swap out bits after a fixed number of holes, to avoid bogging or downtime on their multi-million dollar assembly lines. They have plenty of life left for my uses.) Alas, folks have caught on, and they are now resold on eBay. Resharpened refurbs can be even better, if done well (check the seller's feedback for comments by machinists)

For larger PCB holes, like power wires and screw mounts, 1/8" is usually fine. For the smallest micro-holes, under 1/32", I often use bits that have snapped, because the nubs are sturdy enough for hand-held or drill press use, and I don't need the long cutting tips that smooth the sides of assembly line holes.

Everyone's  needs vary, but I doubt even precision machinists need need 12 sizes under .20" on a hand-held tool! I've never see the need for 60-100 different shapes, sizes, materials and fineness of abrasive bits. For most people, a basic assortment will do -- even that may be overkill, but it's cheaper for the bits you want vs buying individually.

For cut-off discs, expect to burn through a package of 10 discs, breaking one or two on each project, before you develop the skill to keep the disc consistently in the slot -- but those things break in storage and transport anyway, so don't sweat them. Dremel sells an assortment box of disks and cutting wheels of various diameters, in regular and heavy duty, and I got one free, years ago as part of a promo, but I still haven't used most of the types, just the cut-ff discs.

It even includes some mandrel-mounted disks so thick and large diameter that I might be tempted to do some gentle grinding with the sides, but I hope I can resist. Except for drill-shaped bits, it's always better to use the "sides" (which on the case of mandrel-mounts is the edge) than the tip (which is the side of a mandrel mounted tip) of the cutting tip. Though conical diamond or abrasive bits may beg you to use the tips, don't -- they'll only spin off the surface, marring it with skitter marks, and rounding off the tip. The are good for enlarging or smoothing pre-started holes, which preserves their tip and makes them wear their sides in a way that maximizes bit life.

I often use generic zip-bits made for "spiral saws" in my corded Dremel. It has the speed to cut properly with them (they work best at 15,000-30,000 RPM). Spiral saws (really just spiral threaded rotary rasps) are great for cutting gypsum board, tile, some glasses, etc. -- but I can't see shelling out $70-100 for a Roto-Zip™ or even $20-25 for Dremel's attachment. I just use a round 2-3 oz polycarbonate bottle (the clear kind aspirin sometimes comes in).  A Nutra-sweet saccharin bottle just clicks in place over one of the ridges of my old variable speed Dremel, but if you aren't lucky enough to stumble across an exact fit, just use your Dremel to cut/grind one, then drill or cut off the other end so the zip-bit protrudes 3/8-1/2" when fully seated. The bottle forms a see-through guard to hold the cutter square to the surface, catch the shavings/dust, and set the depth of the cut (useful when blind-cutting, say, a new light switch or outlet opening -- you *know* there's wiring back there, and you don't want to hit it). You can custom-make one for each project, but I have one that I've used at least 5 years on dozens of projects. Zip-bit shanks are quite long, so you can usually adjust the cut depth enough by pulling the bit out up to 1/2" before locking it -- but don't overdo it. You'll be exerting a lateral force on the bit, and you don't want it to wobble. You can easily add side handles using padded hose clamps.

#16 Vapor Trails

Vapor Trails

    In a world where I feel so small, I can't stop thinking big.

  • Awaiting Authorisation
  • 16,523 posts

Posted 25 October 2009 - 01:27 PM

Orph,

Yeah-wheel cutters take practice to use. I don't use this tool that often, but I have done some metal cutting as well. You're right that if you don't handle it properly, the wheels disintegrate. It takes practice. I've used them to cut off padlocks, computer case mods, and sometimes computer inner mods for when I need to fit certain devices inside.
Posted Image

Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#17 Orpheus

Orpheus

    Get my agent! I'm supposed to be Castathan, not Indogene

  • Administrator
  • 16,932 posts

Posted 26 July 2010 - 11:07 AM

Having been a Dremel fan for many decades (it was my first and only power tool until I was an adult), it feels like heresy to say this, but I think I may have found a tool that is better in every way, for most uses.

The downside is that it is an air tool, not an electric tool, so let's not plan the music for Dremel's wake yet

It's the Harbor Freight #47869 1/8" Micro Die Grinder. I bought it for $10 a year or two ago, for use as an air motor in a robotics project that I later shelved, but recently rediscovered it, and and fell in love. I did a quick Google, and found reports from others like me [example who had also discovered this micro marvel. I've only begun to explore it's potential.

It's really more like a dental drill than a micro-grinder. Due to its high speed (twice the speed of a corded Dremel; 4-5x the top speed of a cordless dremel) it is silky-smooth (no vibration) and precise, with almost no counter-torque in use. It has plenty of power reserve, and should work on the smallest home compressor. The microgrinder's handpiece is  ~4oz and the size/weight of a Mont Blanc Fountain pen, long lipstick or mascara tube (sometimes a boy  just wants to look pretty, okay?); while the Dremel weigh 2 lbs (900g) and is about the bulk and weight of a medium summer sausage. The Dremel gets hotter with longer use and higher speed, but the microgrinder actually gets cooler with use (because of the rapidly expanding air rushing through it). The microgrinder is also much quieter, which is a huge benefit when doing precision work up close to the workpiece. The hose is lighter and more flexible than a Dremel gooseneck attachment, and you don't need a hanger/stand to suspend your base tool and cord, as you do with a gooseneck

The microgrinder does need 90 PSI for full power and speed, but the 30 PSI many of you may use for airbrushing or painting may work fine for many uses (I'll have to try that): I usually throttle my Dremel down anyway, and 20,000 RPM is a good speed for most jobs. In fact that leads me to my one big caution: at top speed, the microgrinder is much faster than the Dremel, so ramp up your speed cautiously, with a mind toward bit integrity. Some bits can't hand that speed, especially if they are wide, slightly damaged (a chipped grinding stone, slightly bent drill bit) or fragile to begin with. I definitely wouldn't use a cutting wheel or wire brush at above half-speed. If you cozy up to your dentist, s/he may give you his/her old dental bits: they go through a lot each week, and a bit that is too dull to do the finest work in a tooth, mere microns from a nerve or blood vessel may have years of hobby life. The latest pneumatic dental drills go up to at least 100K-150K rpm, so you'll have plenty of safety margin

There's another HF model that's half the speed (the same speed as a Dremel) if you prefer, for $5 less, but I haven't tried it. Speaking of price, I got mine for $10, and that's the price I've seen on all the web reports, so I'm assuming that their new  "standard" price isn't fixed, and that it will be a frequent sale/coupon item at $10. That just makes it even sweeter: a Dremel runs $50-100 now -- plus another $50 for even a knockoff gooseneck attachment/stand to make the Dremel anywhere near as nimble and compact for precise up-close work.

And as always, Mr. Phelps: wear adequate eye, ear and skin protection; and should you attempt actual dentistry with this tool the Secretary will disavow all knowledge -- and trust me, that will be the least of your problems.







. DremelMicro-grinder
Length9" (22cm)5" (12.5 cm)
Diameter2.5" (6cm)3/4" (<2cm)
Weight<2lb (900g)~4 oz (115g)
Top Speed25K or 30K rpm56K rpm


#18 Orpheus

Orpheus

    Get my agent! I'm supposed to be Castathan, not Indogene

  • Administrator
  • 16,932 posts

Posted 30 July 2010 - 06:07 PM

Update: I've tested it with 30 PSI. It'll work (barely), especially if you have a tank and don't run it straight from the compressor -- but it's not very powerful at all at that pressure. I'd compare it to a mediocre cordless, like a no-name 6v drill that runs off AA batteries or cheap rechargables.

So if you have a 90+ PSI system, but happen to have a 30 PSI compressor for use with airbrushes or inflation, you can go ahead and try it at that pressure for convenience, but if you ONLY have 30 PSI, don't buy this microgrinder.

I can also report that makes a poor turbofan powerplant at low pressures, with terrible start-up torque.

Don't ask. Seriously. You know that there's a voice in your head, telling you that you don't want to know.




0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users