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OTer of the Week # 5 - Certifiably Cait!

OT'er of the week Cait 2009

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#1 Shalamar

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 12:19 AM

Thank you Cait, so very much for agreeing to be our fifth OT'er of the Week - you are one of the most lucid, interesting and thoughtful people I have had the pleasure to meet, get to know and become friends with.

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Drew: Here are the rules which should typically be appended to the new thread:

1. The current OTer of the Week chooses the next OTer of the week and starts a thread in their honor.
2. That person's week in the spotlight runs from Monday to Sunday, after which a new OTotW takes over.
3. To keep this interesting please choose someone with whom you typically disagree here on OT, and also someone you don't know well. We'd hate to see it get clubby.
4. Current OTotW should set about picking a successor within a few days in case the search for a new OTotW takes awhile. And also so that person can prepare and write a brief bio like Cait did below.
5. Have fun, and LEARN about each other.


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I sort of hate biographical questions. I'm too old to have any easy answers, and too young to have a history I think is worth sharing.

Anyway I was born a long time ago in Los Angeles, I'm part of the tail end of the Baby-boomers. I am an Aries. I have lived in Southern California almost all of my life, and really never thought about leaving for very long. The weather, the opportunities, and the culture is easier to live with than the more structured cultures of New England or the South for example. "Live and let live" is really quite an accurate description of what it was like when I was growing up and then as a young adult in California.

I went to college locally [UCLA]. Majored in History and minored in economics, then also attended one year of Law School at the same University. My education was interrupted due to a major auto accident {drunken driver}, and in the end, I decided not to finish law school and to just get out there and live my life.

Eventually. I got married and had a baby, and lived pretty much happily ever after. Then the happiness turned to something else, and I divorced and became a single mother.

I went from being a homemaker and a mother to an exec over a one year transition at about 27 years of age. I have been a CFO, an Executive Recruiter, a Project Manager in Market Research, a writer, and some interesting in-between jobs. Now, I mostly make a living doing what used to be a hobby--I am a professional Astrologer. In that capacity, I have had national Horoscope columns that ran weekly and monthly, and I've also had some semi-famous clients [don't ask, I can't tell].

I come from a political family and grew up with political discussions being par for the course over the dinner table. My family is split down the middle [conservative Vs. Liberal] and it's been a constant battle in my family when it comes to politics and history. Don't even ask how we all took the 2000 election. It was a pretty tense Thanksgiving that year.

I am currently single, although I am in an interesting relationship, and still in constant contact with my ex-husband. The death of our son brought us closer together. I feel that is one of the good things that came out of our son's death. Most couples are torn apart, but we were brought closer together even though we were divorced. Life is strange, and you never know what is going to come from life events.

I'm active in community stuff and attend neighborhood meetings for my community. I am also involved in a "mother's against gang violence" group. My son was killed in a drive by and I joined a local group in order to be more involved in city programs that target gangs in Los Angeles.

I live a quite life, I write, I post, I mostly keep to myself. When you get older, you learn that peace and quiet is a valuable commodity in life. I post on EI because I made true friendships a long time ago on Slipstream. I fight with people on line, I have enjoyed people, I have made real friendships on line, and I find the interaction for the most part to be thought provoking and interesting.

Other than that.. I don't know what else to say.

A couple of questions

1) What got you interested in Astrology?  

2) What do you write, and like to write the most?

3) Other than being an Astrologer which job did you like the most, and why? The least and why?

4) Who is / are the greatest influcences in your life?

5) What is the problem in the world today that you think needs the most urgent attention?
The three most important R's
Respect for One's Self / Respect for Others / Responsibility for One's Words & Actions.

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#2 RommieSG

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 12:28 AM

I must say that I'm surprised at this choice. I know over the years you two have butted heads so many times I've lost count. But in the end, I think it gave you more respect for one another. I'm glad to see it. :happy:

Over the years at the various boards we've each been a part of, one of the things that I believe that has been a central part about who you are, is free speech. I think we can all believe in a concept such as free speech, but I think over the years it's something that's defined you. Is there a point in your life, or something that you took part in that brought this out into the forefront above all else?
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#3 Cait

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 01:49 AM

View PostShalamar, on Aug 2 2009, 10:19 PM, said:

1) What got you interested in Astrology?

It was an absolute act of rebellion against my mother.  I was about 14, and was going to get my hair cut one day after school.  She told me not to get it cut, because it was a full moon and the moon was afflicted [yeah, I rolled my eyes too.]  Anyway, I laughed and went anyway.  

I received the worst haircut of my life, and nothing, and I mean nothings grows slower than hair cut on a full moon.  I was so pissed when she kept laughing at me and saying "I told you so", that I decided to "make her wrong".  I mean how difficult could it be to prove that nonsense wrong?  In order to really prove someone wrong or something wrong, well, you have to research it.  So, I did.  It's been decades now, and I'm still trying to prove it and my mother wrong.

As an interesting side note, my ex-husband has been around lately and when I showed him my 'clippings' from  columns and stuff, he laughted.  He said, he thought I was just some crazy loon who believed in Astrology, and stayed up all night typing charts.  Who knew I could turn it into a career.

I've been lucky to be able to do that.

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2) What do you write, and like to write the most?

I'm not sure I have a favorite.  I actually think I had the most fun writing RP's on line with a bunch of you guys.  That was by-far to most fun I ever had writing.  I enjoy erotica, and Sci-Fi too, but not as much as I did RP'ing over at KHC.

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3) Other than being an Astrologer which job did you like the most, and why? The least and why?

I enjoyed being a Market Research Project Manager the most.  We did a lot of Entertainment projects, and it was always interesting to see what changes were made in shows we'd done research on.  That was fun.

I was the most successful being an Executive Headhunter.  Lots of $$, but the stress was unbelievable.  I never enjoyed one minute of it, nor the money.

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4) Who is / are the greatest influcences in your life?

My maternal grandmother.  She taught me to be independent.  My father.  He taught me to focus on what I wanted, and how to win honorably.  My mother, who taught me to forgive myself when I make a mistake [which I've done too often to count--made mistakes that is.].

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5) What is the problem in the world today that you think needs the most urgent attention?

I really don't know.  I guess the most urgent is nuclear proliferation.  Second would be the famine around the world.  All of the other problems pale in comparison to these I think.  


View PostRommieSG, on Aug 2 2009, 10:28 PM, said:

I must say that I'm surprised at this choice. I know over the years you two have butted heads so many times I've lost count. But in the end, I think it gave you more respect for one another. I'm glad to see it. :happy:

Thanks Rommie.  I'm happy it surprised you.  Shal and I have been through a lot, across several message boards.  It's not a secret that we have had our conflicts.  It might surprise you to know that over the years we have concentrated on points of agreement, reached out to say so, and instead of hanging on to upset and negativity, have forged a relationship that is going in a more productive direction--friendship.  I think it says  a lot about both of us.  


We still disagree on some points in politics, but not as many was you might think.  In any event, while we have a stormy past, we've had a rich and remarkable journey to the present and hopefully into the future.  :)


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Over the years at the various boards we've each been a part of, one of the things that I believe that has been a central part about who you are, is free speech. I think we can all believe in a concept such as free speech, but I think over the years it's something that's defined you. Is there a point in your life, or something that you took part in that brought this out into the forefront above all else?

I think it began a long time ago.  I have always worked on school newspapers, and when I was in the 5th grade I think, I did a school project that told the story of the Revolutionary War as if it were being reported first hand.  Sort of a "Breaking News-- Nathan Hale hanged", kind of thing.

I was the editor of my middle school newspaper, my hight school paper, and into college as well.  I don't think you can have that much journalism in your blood and not be a first amendment fanatic.  I'm also very adamant about the responsibilities of free speech.  I think that comes from my journalism background.  Free Speech isn't free, and one has to use it responsibly.  But, I'm one of those people that will fight for the right of anyone to act like a jerk and use his or her speech.  I might react to what they say.  I might get in their faces, but I'd never try and shut them up or censor them.

If there was one defining moment I think it was once in high school.  I'd written an editorial about some thing or another--yes it was political, and it was about some military action, but the details escape me at the moment.  I used an editorial I wrote as the con POV, and a very good letter from a past student who happened to be in the Navy as the Pro POV.  It was good journalism.  I put them side by side to give both sides of the issue.  It was on the editorial page, so it wasn't news, it was opinion.  But it was balanced opinion even if one of them was mine.  I got hauled into the principals office, and nearly expelled for the piece I wrote.  I was called Un-American by some of the teachers, and there was a real cry for me to be expelled.

It put a fire in my belly about free speech and a free press.  I guess it's never gone away.

Anyway, I wasn't expelled, but it was quite an experience.  I was called names in-between classes, had food thrown at me.  At the time, all that did was make me even more rebellious.  Each time I was threatened with something [the last was no graduation ceremony] I became even more defiant about the First Amendment.  

Looking back on it now, I think it must have been hilarious to watch a 16 year old middle class white girl rant and rave about her rights of speech and press and the oppressive administration at my school.  :rolleyes:  They must have thought I was nuts citing history and past struggles for a free press and so on.  I mean how much suffering does a Los Angeles teenager really go through by the age of 16.  You know what I mean.

It was quite a to-do at my school.  In the end, it all blew over, the editorial page became bird cage fodder, and I graduated with honors [and got an A in journalism of course LOL].  I heard that the  teachers held a parry once I was gone.  I was considered a trouble-maker, but not for any of the usual teenage reasons.

This was interesting, thanks Shal for asking me.  I wans't going to involve myself in these, and as you know it was you asking that got me to say "yes".  now I'm glad I did.  Some of these questions have brought back some really good memories.

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#4 Jid

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 05:54 AM

Hey Cait!  A few questions from your resident lurker-monkey:

1)  You said (me paraphrasing, smack me if I'm misreading) that you prefer to stay close to SoCal (can't say I blame you too much, but still), have you travelled much abroad?  If so, where?

2) If I'm not mistaken, you tend to lean more to the left side of US politics (though I'm unsure if you're registered as a Dem or not)  What, if anything, would you say is your most "conservative" viewpoint?  

3) Outside of the viewpoint in 2): what do you think are the main places the two "ruling parties" of the US can, and ought to, meet in the middle on?

4) I love music, so I have to ask:  what do you listen to most, and is there any music you hate?

Thanks :D
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#5 SparkyCola

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 06:01 AM

^Great questions Jid :)

Thanks for being OTer of the week Cait! *indexes*

So... you're going to be subject to my favourite question now :D

How different are you in real life from how you are online?

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But it was balanced opinion even if one of them was mine. I got hauled into the principals office, and nearly expelled for the piece I wrote. I was called Un-American by some of the teachers, and there was a real cry for me to be expelled.

It put a fire in my belly about free speech and a free press. I guess it's never gone away.

Anyway, I wasn't expelled, but it was quite an experience. I was called names in-between classes, had food thrown at me. At the time, all that did was make me even more rebellious. Each time I was threatened with something [the last was no graduation ceremony] I became even more defiant about the First Amendment.

:cool: Good on ya. :cool:

Sparky

Edited by SparkyCola, 03 August 2009 - 06:01 AM.

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#6 Cait

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 10:06 AM

View PostJid, on Aug 3 2009, 03:54 AM, said:

Hey Cait!  A few questions from your resident lurker-monkey:

1)  You said (me paraphrasing, smack me if I'm misreading) that you prefer to stay close to SoCal (can't say I blame you too much, but still), have you travelled much abroad?  If so, where?

Hey Jid!  Good to see you.

I've traveled all around the US, Once to Canada, and in my ill spent youth I worked in Paris on a project for 2 month.  Otherwise, I'm afraid I haven't traveled nearly as much as I want to.

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2) If I'm not mistaken, you tend to lean more to the left side of US politics (though I'm unsure if you're registered as a Dem or not)  What, if anything, would you say is your most "conservative" viewpoint?

I'm not sure it is a conservative POV, but it is not a POV that is welcome among Liberals.  I believe in parental notification when children are having medical procedures.  Yes, I mean when a girl is having an abortion, her parents need to be told.  If we have crept closer and closer to a "Nanny state" this is one of the things that has led to it.  Parents have lost control of their kids, and the government has helped.  Can you imagine being a mother and having something go terribly wrong on an operating table, and you never even knew your child was undergoing a procedure.?  What kind of control can a parent exert over a child or over his or her family, when the government tells children they don't have to listen or inform their parents?  I think it is a prescription for exactly what we have--parents with no control, the government running a family[ and doing a bad job] and kids too young to understand the implications of the freedom the government gives them.

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3) Outside of the viewpoint in 2): what do you think are the main places the two "ruling parties" of the US can, and ought to, meet in the middle on?

Jeeze, as it sits now, I'm not sure they can ever meet in the middle.  But, they ought to be able to agree on immigration.  It needed to be overhauled and it needs to happen now [although I realize it is not on the agenda for the current administration].  I think both political parties should try an meet on that issue.  another issue they should agree on is containing nuclear proliferation around the world.  You wouldn't think there would be any wiggle room between the two parties on that issue.

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4) I love music, so I have to ask:  what do you listen to most, and is there any music you hate?

Thanks :D

AH!!!  Music!!!!  I am a self-professed audiophile.  I love sound.  If I had to pick between my sight and hearing, I'd let my sight go to keep my hearing.  I love sound.  I love the different tenor in voices, and I LOVE MUSIC!!!!!!!  I have an extensive collection dating all the way back to some original recordings in the late 20's [Al Jolson] and through the 30's [Pearl Bailey, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, etc]  I have a recording of the "Cole Trio" [Nat King Cole recorded with his brothers originally], and a lot more.  The records back then need special treatment to be preserved.  They break easily.  The LP's made in the 50's, 60's etc, are vinyl and at least don't break so easy--they melt in heat.  LOL

Anyway to pick one kind of music would just be impossible.  I love it all so much.  I love Opera, Blue Grass, contemporary music, American Fold, Rock and Roll.  -- literally ALL of it.  I even like some popular rap, but I'll admit it was difficult to get to a place where I enjoyed it.  The sound isn't as pleasing as other music.  But I listened to a local rapper [Kid Frost] and love his mixes, then graduated to listening to Tupac and others.  

Over the past year I've concentrated o a lot on Rob Thomas and most recently Bryn Christopher.  I remain a devote of Andrea Bocelli.  When I am blue I pull out some of my 60's Folk recordings.  When I am happy, I play the Doors/Rock and Roll.  When I am melancholy, I play Matchbox 20.  When I am cleaning I play American musicals [West Side Story is my favorite to clean by.]

I LOVE MUSIC!!!

View PostSparkyCola, on Aug 3 2009, 04:01 AM, said:

^Great questions Jid :)

Thanks for being OTer of the week Cait! *indexes*

So... you're going to be subject to my favourite question now :D

How different are you in real life from how you are online?

I'm one of those people that really was helped out of extreme shyness when the Internet became so big.  I am terribly shy in real life.  But, if you know me and I feel comfortable, then I am exactly the same on line as in real life.  I talk too much, I ramble on and on, I'm animated and passionate, all of the things I'm loved and hated for here.  But, upon first meeting in real life, I am terribly shy, which isn't a problem for me on line.  But that's basically the only difference I see between on line and real life.

Great questions guys!!!  Thanks.

Edited by Certifiably Cait, 03 August 2009 - 10:10 AM.

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#7 Bad Wolf

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 11:44 AM

Why Tyr?  ;)

What are your views on spirituality (before Sparky steals the question again).

Do you ever wish you were a lawyer?  (Hint, the right answer is NO.)
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#8 Cait

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 12:27 PM

View PostBad Wolf, on Aug 3 2009, 09:44 AM, said:

Why Tyr?  ;)

Well, the character had amazing potential, and the actor was well, perfect.  I think I fell for all the potential of both Tyr and the Nietzscheans  [I know I misspelled that, but I'm too lazy to go find the right spelling.] and really never was satisfied with the development of either on Andromeda.  

Plus, I tend to really like the flawed anti-hero types anyway.  They are more revealing and less predictable in drama.  Truth is, I really only liked a few characters on Andromeda.  Tyr-Beka-Harper.. The rest held no interest for me at all.  But as you can see all these characters were outside the mainstream.  They were flawed.  They were just more interesting.
  

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What are your views on spirituality (before Sparky steals the question again).

I am not a member of any organized religion.  However there are certain religious rituals that move me deeply.  Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve, can move me to tears.  I was raised a Mormon, and there is really nothing quite like a prayer meeting among the women alone [Relief Society].  That can move me to tears as well.  Something about the sisterhood that gets me every time.  I still stay in touch with the "sisters" at my local ward.

But beyond the occasional ritual that 'gets me', I prefer my own kind of communion with God.  I do believe in God.  Perhaps I have a different description of God than most, but I do believe in God.  I believe we are eternal, and have been always.  I believe in reincarnation.  I believe we do travel to a destination, and I believe that destination is to return to God someday.  How we get there may be different, but I believe we are all trying to find our way back.  I do not believe in one true path.  I believe we were given the gift of "free will', and that free will has etched many paths back to God.

We all find our own way, and hopefully that way brings us what we need.

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Do you ever wish you were a lawyer?  (Hint, the right answer is NO.)

LOL, No.  I never think about it now, although I am happy I have a background in law [especially California law, which as you noted someplace is the most difficult bar to pass in the nation] because it helps me understand how the law works and what it is meant to do for a culture.  

One of the reasons other people wanted me to be a lawyer, was my ability to make an argument.  I can certainly make an argument.  LOL  But, ultimately I would have been driven crazy because the law also constrains lawyers.  I'm such a "justice for all" kind of person, and there is little justice in the legal system.  It is the best system there is, I do believe that, but I seldom see real justice.  Politics has filtered way too far into our legal system to ever really have a hope of "Justice for all".  Maybe sometimes we achieve it, but I am so jaded now about the justice system in general.

Of course that is probably the very reason I should have stuck with it.  Who knows.  LOL

But, truth be told, I never wanted to be a lawyer, I wanted to be a judge.  You just had to become a lawyer first. LOL

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#9 Bad Wolf

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 12:37 PM

My mother says I went to law school to have a legitimate forum in which to argue.

I too have my own personal relationship with God and can be (though not that often) moved by particular religious events.

I agree with you about the flawed rather than the white hat lead.
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#10 Cait

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 12:42 PM

View PostBad Wolf, on Aug 3 2009, 10:37 AM, said:

My mother says I went to law school to have a legitimate forum in which to argue.

LOL, I so understand that.  It was my grandmother that encouraged me to go.  She said I might as well try and make a living out of arguing.  LOL

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I too have my own personal relationship with God and can be (though not that often) moved by particular religious events.

I agree with you about the flawed rather than the white hat lead.

Yes, we've always been pretty much in agreement on these two topics.  :)

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#11 Vapor Trails

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 02:40 PM

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When you get older, you learn that peace and quiet is a valuable commodity in life.

Peace and quiet is also INCREDIBLY f**king hard to come by for some folks. :( For some people, those things are just not in the cards for them.

So-what Cait said.
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Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#12 Paul

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 04:18 PM

Hold up - you actually believe in astrology?
"All Religions are equal and good, if only the people that practice them are honest people; and if Turks and heathens came and wanted to live here in this country, we would build them mosques and churches."
- Frederick II, King of Prussia, evil liberal™
~~~~~~
Cameron: "His wife arranged it for an anniversary present. And if you ask me, if two people really trust each other, a threesome once every seven years might actually help a marriage."
House: "Okay, I say we stop the DDX and discuss that comment."
~~~~~~
"Somebody came along and said 'liberal' means 'soft on crime, soft on drugs, soft on Communism, soft on defense, and we're gonna tax you back to the Stone Age because people shouldn't have to go to work if they don't want to.' And instead of saying, 'Well, excuse me, you right-wing, reactionary, xenophobic, homophobic, anti-education, anti-choice, pro-gun, Leave-it-to-Beaver trip back to the '50s,' we cowered in the corner and said, 'Please don't hurt me.' No more." - Bruno Gianelli

#13 Cait

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 06:00 PM

View PostPaul, on Aug 3 2009, 02:18 PM, said:

Hold up - you actually believe in astrology?

Astrology isn't something one believes in.  And I never said I believed in it anyway.  I said I am an astrologer.  You don't have to believe in it to know how to do it.  As I said, I studied it from the POV of a complete cynic.

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#14 Enkephalen

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 11:49 PM

What do you think about Karmic Astrology?
Kindness is the language the blind can see and the deaf can hear.

#15 Cait

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 01:34 AM

View PostEnkephalen, on Aug 3 2009, 09:49 PM, said:

What do you think about Karmic Astrology?

I don't use it very often myself.  I really prefer sticking to the basics.  New Age Astrology has become so proliferated with Asteroids, comets, new planets, and what have you, that you can make a chart anything you want if you twist it enough.  Kamric Astrology came from the New Age movement in Western Astrology.  I think I prefer Jungian Astrology the most [if I had to pick one of the psychological practices].

The reason I don't use Karmic Astrology much is that none of it is really observable.  It's really all an extrapolation based on a theory regarding The Moon's nodes and Saturn, and knowing what the signs, aspects, houses etc. all mean.  But none of it is really observable.  Karmic Astrology also is dependent upon the belief in reincarnation and Karma itself.  That makes it a spiritual practice and I try to stick with more mundane aspects of Astrology.  I have some clients that come to me for Spiritual help, and I use Karmic Astrology and some Progressions to help those clients, but the majority of my clients come to me for more practical matters.  Karmic Astrology has nothing to do with practicality.

I'll give you an example of "Observable".  If I see a chart with Mars on the Ascendant, I'm going to be able to see a quick temper and quick action in an emergency actually demonstrated by the client.  It's observable.  Now, one might argue [and I'd agree for the most part] that that observation might not have anything to do with Mars and they would be right.  I could not prove it was solely Mars on the Horizon and nothing else.  But Mars on the Horizon does mean a quick temper and the ability to act fast in emergencies.  So at least you can see it.

Kamric Astrology can't be observed.  It can be felt.  It can be deduced.  But it isn't observable.  And while it is fun to explore it with clients or at parties, I don't see how it can really help a client [except for one particular part of life which I'll go into below].  Unless they are really  obsessed with why something is happening and is it Karmic in nature, then I don't go there.  I like to stick with observable things--things that can help a client more than just interesting chatter  and speculation at a Tea for the girls.

The one area where I think it can be enormously helpful is when someone is actually shattered or stressed or unable to move on from something harsh, and all other forms of counseling have failed.  Then, Karmic Astrology can be useful.  It can act as a way to look into the psyche of the client to explore the specific ways that damage, sorrow, and the loss of faith are manifest in the individual.  None of us handle stress and sorrow, etc the same.  Karmic Astrology is very helpful in determinating how to open the door to process such things for a specific individual.  Then the Nodes and Saturn all offer revelations that can very helpful for a specific client.

It's like having a road map.  It's a helpful tool in some counseling.  But it is only a tool and only as helpful as the practitioner and his or her abilities and ethics.

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#16 SparkyCola

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 12:02 PM

Do you have any siblings? If so, do you get on?

:)

Sparky
Able to entertain a thought without taking it home to meet the parents

#17 Cait

Cait

    Democracy Dies in Darkness

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 02:36 PM

View PostSparkyCola, on Aug 4 2009, 10:02 AM, said:

Do you have any siblings? If so, do you get on?

:)

Sparky

I had/have four other siblings.  It's a mixed bag of half brothers and sisters.  My one full [same mother and father] brother, Patrick, passed on in 1999 from complications from an injury during his service in the Military.  We grew up together and were the closest in age.  We were close growing up, not so much once we married and began our own families.  We stayed in touch, and whenever we did see each other you can be sure it would be several hours of conversation about politics.  He was a history teacher, and we loved our talks on politics and history.  

I have a half brother and sister who live up north [same father, different mothers].  I am quite close to Susan, my half sister, considering that we didn't grow up in the same household.  We did spent a lot of time together as children, and that bonding carried over into adulthood I think.  When it comes to extended families, I think that bonding early is important for closeness later in life.  She's a great sister.

My other brother, Michael, I'm not as close with.  He is 12 years my junior and by the time he was born, I was almost a teenager.  He was always more like a job than a sibling.  I watched him for my father and stepmother whenever they needed me.  He's a great guy, has a wonderful wife [his highschool sweetheart] and three great kids.  But, the age difference, and growing up in different households really shows in our lack of real bonding as siblings.

My youngest sister. Caren [same mother/different fathers], well, she and I have a complicated relationship.  She is 13 years my junior and I am the one who practically raised her.  Unlike the babysitter vibe I had with my half brother Michael, Caren always felt like my own kid.  It was complicated for her too.  I'm the one she bonded with as the nurturer when she was a baby.   My mother went right back to work, and her father was not in the picture.  When I got older and left home, she felt abandoned.  Something neither of us realized until we were much older.   She and I are the best of firends now.  It took a while to sort out the confusing childhoods/relationship we both had, but once we did, we settled into a close sister/sister relationship.  I am the closest to her of all my siblings.  We call each other daily, and we talk about everything important.

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#18 SparkyCola

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 03:09 PM

Thank you - and I'm sorry about your brother :hugs:

Sparky
Able to entertain a thought without taking it home to meet the parents

#19 Cait

Cait

    Democracy Dies in Darkness

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 03:21 PM

View PostSparkyCola, on Aug 4 2009, 01:09 PM, said:

Thank you - and I'm sorry about your brother :hugs:

Sparky

Thank you.  I still miss him.  

I've lamented to my mother that the 90's were a difficult decade for the family.  I lost my father in 92, my son in 96 and my brother in 99.  It wasn't a good decade.

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#20 Enkephalen

Enkephalen

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 08:06 PM

Cait, thank you for the in depth response to my first question.

Now, on to something else. . .

If you could spend a quiet afternoon in conversation with someone (anyone living or dead), who would that person be, and why.
Kindness is the language the blind can see and the deaf can hear.



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: OT'er of the week, Cait, 2009

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