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OT'er of the Week-Joe D'Monix

OT'er of the week Joe D'Monix 2009

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#1 Bad Wolf

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 11:00 AM

Heeeeeeeeeeer's D'Monix@!!!!!!!!!  Thanks for doing this!!!

First of all, the initial idea parameters as quoted by Drew:

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Here are the rules which should typically be appended to the new thread:

1. The current OTer of the Week chooses the next OTer of the week and starts a thread in their honor.
2. That person's week in the spotlight runs from Monday to Sunday, after which a new OTotW takes over.
3. To keep this interesting please choose someone with whom you typically disagree here on OT, and also someone you don't know well. We'd hate to see it get clubby.
4. Current OTotW should set about picking a successor within a few days in case the search for a new OTotW takes awhile. And also so that person can prepare and write a brief bio like Bad Wolf did below.
5. Have fun, and LEARN about each other.

Now from the man of the hour:

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Bio of a Madman:

My name is Brian.

I was born on Edwards Air Force Base on August 22, 1969 as my dad was stationed there during his stint in the service, I'm a Leo although I think I am actually on the cusp between that and Virgo, and as such people stay I do not really show the strong attributes (or downsides) of either and express a little of both.

So yeah, I was born under a fire sign (literally, the day after I was born a contractor made a terminal WHOOPSIE and almost burned the base hospital down!)

My family moved to a small town in Oklahoma named Chouteau when I was about a year old or so, and at the age of six I moved to a slightly larger town in Oklahoma called Claremore.  

In school I was the card-carrying nerd, professional loner, and designated weirdo, a certainly different path considering your typical student body in the later part of the 80's in Claremore consisted of a lot of redneck types (and I can say that pretty accurately) with a smattering of other groups thrown in for good measure.  :)

I graduated from a local college with an associates degree in one subject, got my bachelors two years later in a completely different major once i discovered my brain tries to self-destruct when presented with any math problem tougher than algebra...LOL  I work security dispatch on the graveyard shift where I live.

I'm a geek and proud, spending most of my time on the computer, with friends, watching movies, reading, drawing, or gaming.  I started gaming back in about 1980 or so, and have been at it for about 30 years, having started with science fiction roleplaying games like traveller, star frontier, and gamma world - although I played dungeons and dragons like any right-thinking geek, the games I ran were primarily science fiction and modern day games like the original top secret.  I also play tabletop games like Battletech and Warhammer games.

I draw (*points at the art forum* primarily sketch concept art of the science fiction nature, and primarily mechanical devices and structures ranging from guns and swords to bases and battleships.  Some of my sketches are for and have been converted into CGI models for amateur productions and things like some of the Trek fanfilms.  I also have been known to scratch out poetry and short stories from time to time (if i ever get to finish some of them, LOL!)

I am a native american mix: with the blood of the Muscogee Creek, Cherokee, Choctaw, and Blackfoot nations in my veins, and am proud of that fact, I attend powwows, and tribal functions as I am able.

Although regged Republican (ducks hurled fruits and vegetables) I tend to vote for whomever I think who can actually do the job without completely malfing it up - easier said than done in this days.

I am a member of the Patriot Guard Riders, and have attended honor missions for fallen veterans, my family is full of veterans as my dad and both my grandfathers are veterans (though my maternal grandfather has since passed from this world) and my great-uncle is the first native american (as i recall correctly) to be recognized with the Congressional Medal of Honor (in part by tossing rocks at the Germans, but thats another story)

Physically: i will be 40 (or 25 for the 15th time) in less than two weeks, I stand six foot six inches tall (my girlfriend is four foot eight) and definately look native american.

In 2007 I was diagnosed type 2 diabetic, and at the time weighed 389 pounds, I now weigh about 300 or so (it bounces up and down)

And yes, I speak with an Okie TWANG! in my voice.

Terribly exciting?  Nah, Filled with academicand world-shattering accomplishments?  Are you kidding?

But there it is, thats me :D


So here are a few questions to get the ball rolling:

What is your favorite thing about Oklahoma?
What are your views on spirituality and how have they developed/changed over say the last ten years?
What issue do you most view as a deal breaker when it comes to voting for a president?

K....off we go!
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#2 Nonny

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 01:23 PM

Why did the ducks hurl the fruits and vegetables?     ;)  

Will you tell us the story of your great-uncle, the rocks, the Nazis and the Congressional Medal of Honor?  Please?    :)
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The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

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#3 D'Monix

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 11:54 PM

View PostBad Wolf, on Aug 16 2009, 04:00 PM, said:

Heeeeeeeeeeer's D'Monix@!!!!!!!!!  Thanks for doing this!!!


So here are a few questions to get the ball rolling:

What is your favorite thing about Oklahoma?
What are your views on spirituality and how have they developed/changed over say the last ten years?
What issue do you most view as a deal breaker when it comes to voting for a president?

K....off we go!

Hehe.

Favorite thing about Oklahoma: Wow, I could say the terrain which is more varied than one would think depending on which half of the state you are in, but I think if I had to choose one if it would be the people.

Like anywhere else we have some bad eggs. but by and large the average person here is polite and friendly, ready to lend a hand to others when they need it for just about any reason, at least in my experience.  A common joke is that an Oklahoma Traffic Jam is caused by four drivers stopped at a four way stop sign all motioning for each other to go first.  

I think a good example of this is when Timothy McVeigh blew up the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City in 1995 (I think it was 95) and the reaction of the volunteer emergency crews to way Oklahomans greeted them, fed them, and showed them welcome.  

We didnt forget, either, when 9/11 happened there were fire and emergency crews saddling up to get their butts down to New York to help, with anything.  Because here we don't forget a kindness (as a general rule usually) and pay it back in kind.


Spirituality: I was born a Baptist and for a long time just became jaded with religion in general leading up to my 20's or so.  As I get older I find myself dispensing with the  dogma and denominational trappings of christianity and trying to get at the core of its teachings, a way to live without shoving beliefs down others throats.  personally i tend to think that faith can be a good thing, but its the dogmas and sects and denominations or more organized religion that tends to be where the trouble starts.  I do also want read and study more on the Creek religion, although I can't really talk much about that - and one will find that not many do who practice it - it's not that its like human sacrifice or anything like that, but the practice went underground during the time that native religion and language and such was discouraged and has stayed more or less underground ever since.

Presidents: Someone who denigrates or belittles the people in the service will never ever get my vote for sure, there may be a lot of reasons why i decide to vote or not to vote for an individual, but that one will trump any other reason for me.

#4 D'Monix

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 12:15 AM

View PostNonny, on Aug 16 2009, 06:23 PM, said:

Why did the ducks hurl the fruits and vegetables?     ;)

Those ducks - they are not above a little fowl play now and again, one would be wise not to ruffle their feathers or insinuate they are not all that they are quacked up to be!


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Will you tell us the story of your great-uncle, the rocks, the Nazis and the Congressional Medal of Honor?  Please?    :)

Straight from his CMH citation:

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CHILDERS, ERNEST

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, 45th Infantry Division. Place and date: At Oliveto, Italy, 22 September 1943. Entered service at: Tulsa, Okla. Birth: Broken Arrow, Okla. G.O. No.: 30, 8 April 1944. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty in action on 22 September 1943, at Oliveto, Italy. Although 2d Lt. Childers previously had just suffered a fractured instep he, with 8 enlisted men, advanced up a hill toward enemy machinegun nests. The group advanced to a rock wall overlooking a cornfield and 2d Lt. Childers ordered a base of fire laid across the field so that he could advance. When he was fired upon by 2 enemy snipers from a nearby house he killed both of them. He moved behind the machinegun nests and killed all occupants of the nearer one. He continued toward the second one and threw rocks into it. When the 2 occupants of the nest raised up, he shot 1. The other was killed by 1 of the 8 enlisted men. 2d Lt. Childers continued his advance toward a house farther up the hill, and single-handed, captured an enemy mortar observer. The exceptional leadership, initiative, calmness under fire, and conspicuous gallantry displayed by 2d Lt. Childers were an inspiration to his men.

I had only gotten to meet my - I guess it would be great-uncle since he was the brother of my grandpa? - a few times as well as his other brother Anderson, and now my grandpa Owen is the last sibling still living (my grandpa was also a Marine in the Pacific Theatre)  Ernest as a man though had the strength of his convictions behind him, and was a warm and strong person.  Others who knew him called him 'Chief' - which is generally not really a good idea to call an native american (although it happens a lot especially then) since I know the only people I allow to call me that is close friends and just about anyone else is asking for a good snarling at.  But he didn't seem to mind so much from what I recall of him.

Here is a story published by the Washington Post when he passed away.

Link

When it was said the next world war would be fought with rocks, I guess they didnt know that one soldier in the current war ofthe time DID fight with rocks! :D

In fact, Nonny just a few days before on this last Wednesday I visited Floral Haven with my girlfriend (now fiancee) to my uncle Ernest's gravesite.  Once I get the pictures uploaded from my camera i'll post them in the thread, but you can find his entry at Find A Grave: Ernest Childers

#5 Nonny

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 10:42 AM

View PostJoe D'Monix, on Aug 16 2009, 10:15 PM, said:

View PostNonny, on Aug 16 2009, 06:23 PM, said:

Why did the ducks hurl the fruits and vegetables?     ;)

Those ducks - they are not above a little fowl play now and again, one would be wise not to ruffle their feathers or insinuate they are not all that they are quacked up to be!
:howling:  

Quote

Quote

Will you tell us the story of your great-uncle, the rocks, the Nazis and the Congressional Medal of Honor?  Please?    :)

Straight from his CMH citation:

Quote

CHILDERS, ERNEST

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, 45th Infantry Division. Place and date: At Oliveto, Italy, 22 September 1943. Entered service at: Tulsa, Okla. Birth: Broken Arrow, Okla. G.O. No.: 30, 8 April 1944. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty in action on 22 September 1943, at Oliveto, Italy. Although 2d Lt. Childers previously had just suffered a fractured instep he, with 8 enlisted men, advanced up a hill toward enemy machinegun nests. The group advanced to a rock wall overlooking a cornfield and 2d Lt. Childers ordered a base of fire laid across the field so that he could advance. When he was fired upon by 2 enemy snipers from a nearby house he killed both of them. He moved behind the machinegun nests and killed all occupants of the nearer one. He continued toward the second one and threw rocks into it. When the 2 occupants of the nest raised up, he shot 1. The other was killed by 1 of the 8 enlisted men. 2d Lt. Childers continued his advance toward a house farther up the hill, and single-handed, captured an enemy mortar observer. The exceptional leadership, initiative, calmness under fire, and conspicuous gallantry displayed by 2d Lt. Childers were an inspiration to his men.

I had only gotten to meet my - I guess it would be great-uncle since he was the brother of my grandpa? - a few times as well as his other brother Anderson, and now my grandpa Owen is the last sibling still living (my grandpa was also a Marine in the Pacific Theatre)  Ernest as a man though had the strength of his convictions behind him, and was a warm and strong person.  Others who knew him called him 'Chief' - which is generally not really a good idea to call an native american (although it happens a lot especially then) since I know the only people I allow to call me that is close friends and just about anyone else is asking for a good snarling at.  But he didn't seem to mind so much from what I recall of him.

Here is a story published by the Washington Post when he passed away.

Link

When it was said the next world war would be fought with rocks, I guess they didnt know that one soldier in the current war ofthe time DID fight with rocks! :D

In fact, Nonny just a few days before on this last Wednesday I visited Floral Haven with my girlfriend (now fiancee) to my uncle Ernest's gravesite.  Once I get the pictures uploaded from my camera i'll post them in the thread, but you can find his entry at Find A Grave: Ernest Childers
When I read this earlier, I thought, hmmm, I've heard of him.  So after I took my walk and my brain was working better, I did a search, and by golly, I have heard of him.   :)   I hope you will continue to post In Memorium threads at Memorial Day and other times and tell us about your courageous great uncle who kicked his brain into overdrive under fire.  I love his comment:

Quote

From his position, he saw a second nest and pitched in rocks to frighten the men manning it. "I assume they thought it was a hand grenade, because nobody throws rocks," he said.

Posted Image


The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#6 Shalamar

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 01:15 PM

Hey D'Monix Thanks for sharing with us.

If you could travel anywhere - time and money no object - where would you like to go?

Congrants on her saying yes by the way.

Favorite music?

Sunrise or sunset?
The three most important R's
Respect for One's Self / Respect for Others / Responsibility for One's Words & Actions.

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#7 D'Monix

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 11:22 PM

View PostShalamar, on Aug 17 2009, 06:15 PM, said:

Hey D'Monix Thanks for sharing with us.

If you could travel anywhere - time and money no object - where would you like to go?

Denmark

Courtesy of my granddad on my mom's side i'm a quarter Danish (I know a mix of native american and viking is a scary thing, lol)  and I would love to visit the country that his patrents came from.

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Congrants on her saying yes by the way.

Thankee!

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Favorite music?

Heheh heavy metal and symphonic, especially bands like Iron Maiden, Iced Earth and Kamelot.  My fiancee is a big fan of Kamelot too :)

Quote

Sunrise or sunset?

I would say sunset, because i work all night and have for the last six years or so I get to see the sunrise every morning, but Im asleep at sunset and only become awake after the sun goes down, so the sunset is like dawn (and the sunrise is like the sunset )

#8 Bad Wolf

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 09:18 AM

I'm not a big fan of organized religion myself (yeah I know that's a surprise).

So, what do you think of the idea of God (or Gods)?
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#9 Spectacles

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 05:30 PM

I see you're about to become a married man. :)

My uncle and aunt had the most amazing marriage I've ever seen. They were together 54 years, and in the end, he cared for her at home, with loving patience, while she suffered from Alzheimer's. (Fortunately, their daughter and her also-wonderful husband lived right next to them on the farm, and this helped immensely.) He died not quite a year later himself from mesothelioma. Their devotion to each other--and their deep, deep friendship--was beautiful to see. I wish that kind of abiding love for you and your fiance. :)

My question: what do you think are the keys to a long, successful marriage (or partnership)?
"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman

#10 D'Monix

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 05:52 AM

View PostBad Wolf, on Aug 19 2009, 02:18 PM, said:

I'm not a big fan of organized religion myself (yeah I know that's a surprise).

So, what do you think of the idea of God (or Gods)?

Hehe well I believe that there are supernatural things in the world, and I do believe in God I just try to follow those things without shoving my belief on anyone else.  I know I don't always succeed in that following of the basic tenants of Christianity (not those taught by denominations and organized religions, either) - my temper is my biggest failing at times, although Kim (my fiancee) has been the greatest reducer of my blood pressure in a long time and I generally don't get annoyed anymore.   Maybe someday my spirituality will gravitate towards somewhere else, or maybe not, til then i do as i always have - i dont go to church because to me belief is a private thing, you carry it around in your heart and not in a building, if that makes any sense (or i could just be icoherently rambling as always)

#11 D'Monix

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 06:03 AM

View PostSpectacles, on Aug 19 2009, 10:30 PM, said:

I see you're about to become a married man. :)

My uncle and aunt had the most amazing marriage I've ever seen. They were together 54 years, and in the end, he cared for her at home, with loving patience, while she suffered from Alzheimer's. (Fortunately, their daughter and her also-wonderful husband lived right next to them on the farm, and this helped immensely.) He died not quite a year later himself from mesothelioma. Their devotion to each other--and their deep, deep friendship--was beautiful to see. I wish that kind of abiding love for you and your fiance. :)

My question: what do you think are the keys to a long, successful marriage (or partnership)?

I am at that :D

I think Mutual Trust, Patience, Respect, Love, Friendship.

I was friends with Kim for almost ten years before we started dating, knew her when she was married to the jackass she was married to before - and I say that because of the way that he treated her.  Her cousin knew that I was interested in her, and he had hoped to get us together. It took a while but it happened - and when it did it was if it had been there all along between us (and maybe it had) So it was natural.

She's a nerd like me, a roleplaying gamer, a computer gamer,  a trekkie, a star wars fan (for our dating anniversary I got us tickets to see THIS for later on in the year :D) and part cherokee as well.

So, with all that, I am hopeful :D

My grandparents on my mom's side had that long loving marriage that you referred to, so I'll tell y'all a true story.

Back in World War II, 1942 I think.  My grandfather, Harold Sorenson was on his way from Minnesota to Mississippi for training for the Army Air Corps (he was in the 9th Air Force assigned to twin engine attack bombers all the way through World War II.) and my grandmother Bernita was on her way from visiting relatives to St. Louis to take a job in one of the war plants there (and i  hope im getting that part right)

They met on the train, my grandfather sitting by my future grandmother, and talked all the way up to the point where they had to part for their respective destinations, but not before my grandfather got my grandmother's address.

He corresponded to her all through his training and all through the war, he painted her name on the engine on one of his later bombers, an A-26 Invader (2 man solid nose attack bomber) as did the pilot as a good luck charm to bring them home.

He even proposed to her from overseas, his sister mailing him a catalog to pick out a ring and then my grandfather sending her what money he had to get it.

When V-E Day came, and my grandfather came home to Minnesota after that, he headed out to Arkansas where my grandmother lived with her parents to see Bernita again.  As my grandmother put it, she was standing with her father - a guy almost as tall as me and I am six foot six inches tall - when my grandfather's taxi came.  Her daddy asked her if that was the boy she was gonna marry.  She answered yes, and my greatgrandfather then took a look at him, thought for a minute and said "well, you go ahead and marry that boy then."

So they never dated before they were engaged.

At my grandfather's funeral the pastor retold this story again as part of my grandfather's eulogy and commented if there are any screenwriters in the audience that they needed to get ahold of my grandmother (who is still living)  cos she sure did have a good movie (or book) idea for them based on all that :)

Incidentally my relationship with kim is like history repeating itself from my grandmothers parents since my greatgrandfather was almost as tall as i am, and my greatgrandmother was only a couple of inches taller than kim is (and she is four foot eight.)

Anyway this has been a novel - see what you made me do? :)

But

If I could be half the man my grandfather was and half the strength of love in my marriage as he did with his then I think we will be doing pretty dang good.

D'

Edited by Joe D'Monix, 20 August 2009 - 06:17 AM.


#12 sierraleone

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 07:41 AM

View PostJoe D'Monix, on Aug 20 2009, 07:03 AM, said:

View PostSpectacles, on Aug 19 2009, 10:30 PM, said:

I see you're about to become a married man. :)

My uncle and aunt had the most amazing marriage I've ever seen. They were together 54 years, and in the end, he cared for her at home, with loving patience, while she suffered from Alzheimer's. (Fortunately, their daughter and her also-wonderful husband lived right next to them on the farm, and this helped immensely.) He died not quite a year later himself from mesothelioma. Their devotion to each other--and their deep, deep friendship--was beautiful to see. I wish that kind of abiding love for you and your fiance. :)

My question: what do you think are the keys to a long, successful marriage (or partnership)?

I am at that :D

I think Mutual Trust, Patience, Respect, Love, Friendship.

Yeah, you need all those to get through any communication mishaps ;) I wish you well :)


Wow, what an awesome story about your grandparents :D

Boy is there a height differential between you and your fiancee .... you are very tall for a man, and she is very short for a woman (I'm 5 foot nothing myself done growing, and have a brother about 6'3" IIRC and he may not be done growing yet) .... where the heck do you guys shop for clothes?! (not the same store I presume ;) )
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Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.
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#13 D'Monix

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 11:21 AM

View Postsierraleone, on Aug 20 2009, 12:41 PM, said:

Boy is there a height differential between you and your fiancee .... you are very tall for a man, and she is very short for a woman (I'm 5 foot nothing myself done growing, and have a brother about 6'3" IIRC and he may not be done growing yet) .... where the heck do you guys shop for clothes?! (not the same store I presume ;) )

The toughest part is buying shoes! :)

For example: I wear size 16 Frankenstein shoes and Kim has to go to the children's department for hers!

#14 Spectacles

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 11:35 AM

^That's a wonderful story, D'.  

Thanks.
"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman

#15 Nonny

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 04:45 PM

View PostJoe D'Monix, on Aug 20 2009, 03:52 AM, said:

Maybe someday my spirituality will gravitate towards somewhere else, or maybe not, til then i do as i always have - i dont go to church because to me belief is a private thing, you carry it around in your heart and not in a building, if that makes any sense (or i could just be icoherently rambling as always)
Makes perfect sense to me.    :)
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The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#16 Nonny

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 04:47 PM

View PostJoe D'Monix, on Aug 20 2009, 04:03 AM, said:

If I could be half the man my grandfather was and half the strength of love in my marriage as he did with his then I think we will be doing pretty dang good.
I think you will too.  

{{{{{{{{{{{D' and Kim}}}}}}}}}}}
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The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot



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