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OT'er Of The Week - Week 8: QueenTiye!

OT'er of the week QueenTiye 2009

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#1 D'Monix

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 12:54 AM

As I slip back off back into insanity its time to pass the torch to a new Vict--err--Esteemed Guest of Honor!

So, I give you QueenTiye!

Da Roolz (as generally put down by Drew)

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Here are the rules which should typically be appended to the new thread:

1. The current OTer of the Week chooses the next OTer of the week and starts a thread in their honor.
2. That person's week in the spotlight runs from Monday to Sunday, after which a new OTotW takes over.
3. To keep this interesting please choose someone with whom you typically disagree here on OT, and also someone you don't know well. We'd hate to see it get clubby.
4. Current OTotW should set about picking a successor within a few days in case the search for a new OTotW takes awhile. And also so that person can prepare and write a brief bio like Bad Wolf did below.
5. Have fun, and LEARN about each other.

And now, to hear from the queen herself:

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Biography

My given name is Tamara, and my middle name starts with an E. Consequently, at birth, I was also given a nickname - Tam-E. My first name is pronounced TAM-uh-ruh, as opposed to Tah-MARE-ah, which is how most people I encounter pronounce it. Both are right, only one is my name. And, because I've had it since birth, I give permission to people to use my nickname only if they can spell it - and I'm a stickler on these two points.

I suck at biographies, because there's always too much and nothing to tell. I was born in Brooklyn, NY, and spent all of my life there until I was married, upon which, I moved to New Jersey. I lived in New Jersey for a lot of years - 4 years before my son was born, and then 11 years after. The most interesting thing I can say about the experience is how very true it is that different states are, at root, different countries. We are all one country, but there are really subtle differences - I find it hard to explain how happy I was when I moved back to New York State where my son could take Regents exams instead of whatever it is that New Jersey uses to test high school competence.

As a child, I was sickly with childhood asthma. Early in my childhood, that meant staying away from a lot of physical activities. It wasn't until high school that the thinking on asthma shifted, and a stubborn gym teacher threatened to flunk me if I didn't finish a mile, that I realized that I could do more than I thought I could. My son has asthma now, but you'd hardly know it, because he's such an athlete. Anyway, between being shy, and being sickly, I spent quite a lot of time reading. Alas for my misspent youth! As avaricious a reader as I was - I mostly read harlequin romances.  So, my list of books read is quite unimpressive.  My mother, ever frustrated with my predilection for Harlequins, and my resistance to reading much of anything else (maybe except comic books when she'd let me) insisted on me reading Jane Austen. I was sure I was going to HATE it... instead I've read every one of Jane Austen's novels at least twice, some quite a few more times than that.

I grew up in Flatbush, literally on the corner of Flatbush Avenue, and a nice middle class side street. Such was my life. If, upon walking out my door, I turned to the left, my world was comfortably middle class. If I turned to my right, it was edgily urban - inner-city urban. Consequently, I had a lot of experiences at a younger age, than perhaps most. For instance - I was something of a binge drinker by the time I was 14, and could out-drink most of the guys in the neighborhood, if I wanted to. But also at age 14, I became born-again. I often say, but for the grace of God, and my relationship with the church (United Methodist Church, incidentally) I would have been one of those early teenage pregnancy statistics. All the building blocks of disaster were quite a part of my life, and I was a little bit fresh. Still, somehow, I managed to get all the way to college without actually having sex, and without totally becoming a drunk. By nineteen, with lots of family grief as a catalyst, I sobered up. I had one more binge episode after that, but by 21, I was done drinking for good, and this past October, I celebrated 20 years sober.

I converted to Islam as an adult - that's a long and winding tale that I just deleted 2 paragraphs of... Long and short, my conversion was both a matter of faith and practicality. At some point, I realized that I believed in the tenets of Islam, but didn't have any overwhelming desire to convert - but my then boyfriend considered my non-Islamic status a sticking point. Since I believed, I didn't see any good reason to let that be an issue between us, and I converted.

My personal experiences with Islam proved challenging. At least partially because I had such an eclectic practice in the first place, and because my reading of the Qur'an showed me nowhere where I was wrong in my practice, I strongly resented the various immigrants who always wanted to claim the "right" Islam - and call upon various hadith (stories) to justify their claims. If you're not born to Islam, hadith study is hard - there are so many volumes of hadith, and they are frequently contradictory - and yet, it turns out that any new Islamic movement can call upon some obscure hadith to justify things not found in the Qur'an. I found it offensive, and consequently, had no real religious community to which I could belong. 9/11 had a tremendous effect on me - it was kind of a deadening effect. I know how a 9/11 happens in Islam - ignorance of people and trickery of leaders. I became even more isolated than ever before. It was actually an Ex Isler who once asked me why I belonged to a religion from which I differed so much. My answer then was "I believe in the 5 pillars of Islam." I did then, I do now. But luckily for me, it turns out that there was another Faith - the Baha'i Faith, that enabled me to harmonize my early Christian beliefs and my later Islamic beliefs - when I learned about the Baha'i Faith, I first thought it was something someone had made up. I couldn't believe there was an actual religion like that - I could have written it myself! But a close investigation showed that it had all the hallmarks of a true religion - a divine revelation tested in the fire and all of the rest... and it was therefore a no-brainer that I would convert.

I think that's quite a lot! OH! the only other thing to add is how I come to be a member of this community. At a certain point of my life, I was going through quite a messy home circumstance, and found my life uncomfortably circumscribed. Seeking a way out of the limits that had grown up around me, I started fetching around for something that would be JUST mine. Star Trek fandom seemed to fit the bill. As geeky as it always seemed to me, it also always seemed fun - and I kinda admired the encyclopedic knowledge of REAL fans. So I set out to join a fan community online, and turn myself into that kind of fan, since I was already a casual fan. I think I found myself at TrekBBS, and registered there, but it didn't stick, because the fandom was too big. Somewhere along the line, they announced a new show, Andromeda, and a new web site, SlipstreamBBS. I registered at the new site, and then forgot about it. I was registered there as Queen Tiye, but I never could figure out my password, or what email address I'd used, so I had to re-register... this time as QueenTiye... which I did after the first episode of Andromeda aired. SSBBS was a small community, small enough for me to get in and be a part, and Andromeda was young enough for me to be almost as knowledgeable as anyone else... and the rest, as they say, is history!

I share that last part, to let everyone here know how much this community really does mean to me. I'm very happy that we have survived as a community, and hope that exercises like this continue to help us flourish.

Few questions:

1. Why Queen Tiye (or QueenTiye?)

2. As I recall, you and maybe Cait? used to have very lengthy forum conversations on Nietzcheans in Andromeda, so that leads me to ask what is your absolute favorite (if you had to choose one) Andromeda episode?

3. You mentioned 9/11 - how close were you when that happened? I seem to remember something about you being way too close to comfort?

thanks!

D'

#2 SparkyCola

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 10:02 AM

Thanks for that biography QT. :) I've probably commented on this before but, you have a lovely writing style. The questions:

How similar are you online and offline?

The "travelling" question: where have you been, and if you could, where would you go?

How much of an influence do you think your parents had on you?

Are there any periods of history you are particularly interested in?

What kind of art do you like?

Thanks :)

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#3 scherzo

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 11:36 AM

When you were a kid did you ever go to the RKO Kenmore Theatre on Church Ave?

It was the first place I remember being able to go to the movies without parents in tow.
"Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant; it's just that they know so much that isn't so."    -Ronald Reagan, October 27 1964
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#4 QueenTiye

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 12:15 PM

First, thanks, D' for choosing me.  I'm very honored! :) And I've said this before, but I'll say it again - thank you, Drew for starting this concept - it has been a great deal of fun learning about our fellow Ex Islers.   Ok, now on to the questions:

View PostJoe D'Monix, on Aug 22 2009, 01:54 AM, said:

Few questions:

1. Why Queen Tiye (or QueenTiye?)

Well, I wanted a name that would reflect both that I was African-American, and female, and I wanted something catchy. QT conveniently sounds like "Cutie" so I liked that, and then there is the historical Queen Tiye - a remarkable woman.  Queen Tiye (also commonly spelled Ty, or Tiy; because of the lack of lettered vowels in Ancient Egyptian, no one really knows) was the mother of the "Heretic King" Akhenaten, and grandmother of King Tutankhamen.  She is one of the only queens of Egypt to have ruled as co-regent with her husband, Amenhotep III, and to have her name scribed on royal decrees as such.  Her most famous statue suggests that she was of Nubian origin - so whatever the ethnic makeup of the Ancient Egyptians, the ethnicity of Tiye is not generally held to be ambiguous.  And that most famous statue is quite fierce - you wouldn't want to mess with her. ;) So, I chose to be her namesake, as a reminder to myself to conduct myself worthily online. Here's a link to more info about her if any are interested:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiye  and here (because for some reason, the wiki article doesn't have it) is that most famous statue:  http://wysinger.home...d.com/tiye.html

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2. As I recall, you and maybe Cait? used to have very lengthy forum conversations on Nietzcheans in Andromeda, so that leads me to ask what is your absolute favorite (if you had to choose one) Andromeda episode?

Oh, hands down, Double Helix. :)  It was that episode that gave us the Matriarchy, and many many many days of speculation on the nature of that institution.  I do wish that another science-fiction show would invest in something so unique culturally, as to provide this depth of exploration.  The only other series to have ever given us this much culture building was Star Trek DS9, and I was only marginally online when that series was on the air.

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3. You mentioned 9/11 - how close were you when that happened? I seem to remember something about you being way too close to comfort?

thanks!

D'

Yeah.  I was underground in the PATH (Port Authority Trans Hudson) tubes travelling into the World Trade Center when the first plane hit.  When I emerged from the WTC train station, there was debris flying all through the air, which I noted, but it looked like an office fire, and so I didn't pay it any mind.  I work about 8 blocks from the WTC - so by the time I got to my office building, the news was covering the airplane crash on a big screen in the lobby, and I was stunned to notice where the plane had hit.  To put that in context - we had moved, about 3 weeks earlier, from the very building that was hit first, to where I work now.  And the plane, from what I could see of the hit, and from what was being reported, had hit right where my office would have been (I worked on the 86th floor of WTC 1).  Obviously disconcerting, but at that time, we were still thinking that maybe this was a tragic accident.  Not too long later, another plane hit - and of course that told us that indeed, the country was under attack.  Perhaps unwisely, but very New Yorkerly, I went outside, after the second plane hit, to see how close to the site I could get - I wanted to look for myself, especially at the first plane strike, since that one felt more personal.  But I work south of the WTC, so I couldn't get back around to the North tower - police had it blocked off.  Instead, I stood staring at the south tower (WTC 2), which had been hit lower to its center of gravity.  I noticed, while standing there, that the building was.... bent.  If you've ever seen the twin towers when they stood, you'll know that the slightest "bend" is completely out of the ordinary - I concluded from this that the building was about to fall, and started telling everyone around me to get out of there, all the while walking back to my office.  I got back to the building, up the elevator to my floor, into my office, when all of a sudden, the sky completely darkened amidst a crashing sound like an explosion.  It was terrifying, and when I say it went dark - I mean it.  Tuesday 9/11/01 was a gorgeous, cloudless day, and it all of a sudden looked like midnight.  Thus began the harrowing (for me) part of the 9/11 experience.


View PostSparkyCola, on Aug 22 2009, 11:02 AM, said:

Thanks for that biography QT. :) I've probably commented on this before but, you have a lovely writing style.
Oh dear... I'm sure I would have remembered so kind a compliment! :blush:  Thank you! :)

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The questions:

How similar are you online and offline?

I kinda hope Cardie, or long lost Ishmael Autolycus or Delvo will chime in. They've all met me at least once, and can probably better answer the question.  I do know I'm more polite online than off.  I rarely curse online, and I always bowlderize. In rl, I can cuss like a sailor if you get me started.  Its because of the permanence of text that I make that distinction.   Otherwise, I really can't answer the question.  The nature of text is that a lot of who you are is interpretted by the reader, and not by anything you do.  I try to be myself, as much as possible.

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The "travelling" question: where have you been, and if you could, where would you go?

Glad you asked this, since I forgot to give my zodiac info... :)  I'm a Cancer, which should mean I'm very home-bound and domestic, but according to numerology, I'm a 5 lifepath, which means I'm a traveller.  A book I read harmonizing between the two disciplines says that I am a "hermit crab" - preferring to make home in lots of different places.  That's about right.  I haven't been a whole lot of places - inside the US, I've been to several states, but I've only left the country twice in my life - when I was 11 to Panama, and just this June, to Nigeria.  If I had the chance, I'd travel all over.  Every place is interesting to me - especially if I can get away from tourist traps, which I appreciate only in context of the rest of the region.

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How much of an influence do you think your parents had on you?

Oh, a lot.  I actually had 4 parents - my mom and dad divorced when I was 8, and both of them remarried.  So I wound up with an evil stepfather, and a crazy stepmother. :) I've spoken about my stepmother before - she was quite the character - any fight I have in me, I got from her.  My mom gave me a very healthy appreciation for institutional values, such as education and church and voting, and my dad was a community organizer, which gave me an appreciation for the ability of people to create solutions on their own.  There's so much more to say there, I could go on and on.  But as it turns out, my dad died nearly a year ago, and my stepmother last May, so I'm in a little bit of a melancholy mood where they are concerned, and don't much want to dwell on them too much.  I can say that their experiences (all 4 of them) led directly to my sobriety, and to many of the more conservative opinions I have about things.

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Are there any periods of history you are particularly interested in?

Not explicitly, no.  What I'm interested in is people - and how various things shape them.  History and religion intertwine to make a people, and that interests me immensely.  For black history, though, there is a unique period of history that I particularly find intriguing - the early 1900's.  Especially, the number of religious movements that emerged, splintered, and continued forward into some of the institutions we see today... Marcus Garvey, Noble Drew Ali, Elijah Muhammad, Father Divine, Daddy Grace - these folks led pretty influential movements in the black community and have lasting repercussions.  I find that history fascinating.

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What kind of art do you like?

Thanks :)

Sparky

I'm not much into art.  The kind of art I like is therefore, the kind that is pretty to look at.  I don't like abstract art unless it is really beautiful in its lines and forms, and I hate so much of the modern art that seems to take ugliness, both as concept and aesthetic, as a mission statement.  I remember coming to an understanding at one art exhibit I went to, of how, during the AIDS and crack epidemic, so many of the artists began to create ugliness as a statement of reality.  Truly violent, vile,  ugly works being displayed and celebrated.  I understood it, but I honestly didn't like it.

That said - I remember one day visiting the Museum of the City of New York on a student assignment.  I had been wandering around for so long in the museum, and I was hungry... got to the fourth floor (I think) and saw a newstand.  OK - I thought it was just a bit odd for a newsstand to be in the museum, but a Museum of The City of New York after all, could possibly have such a thing, right? While I was digging about for change to buy a candy bar, and walking closer to the newstand, all of a sudden, I was close enough to realize - it was a painting.  Oil on Canvass, but because of the arches, the left and right  framing of the picture was obscured, and from the original distance that I first saw it - the top and bottom framing were missed as well.  So - yeah.  I like THAT kind of art - the kind that has the rich detail that lets you feel a sense of genuine familiarity. :)

View Postscherzo, on Aug 22 2009, 12:36 PM, said:

When you were a kid did you ever go to the RKO Kenmore Theatre on Church Ave?

It was the first place I remember being able to go to the movies without parents in tow.


Absolutely!  And, me too. :)  In fact, walking up and down Flatbush Avenue was, back in the day, the equivalent of "malling."  Church Avenue was in walking distance.  Also - not sure if you're old enough to remember the grocery store on the way, or if its still there... trying to remember the name. Waldbaum's I think.  I remind my son all the time of how easy he has it now that going to the supermarket requires a car.  I remember pushing shopping carts to and from the supermarket all by myself. :)

QT

Edited by QueenTiye, 22 August 2009 - 12:21 PM.

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#5 QueenTiye

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 12:31 PM

Oh - and I have a request:

Can we add the following links to the index thread:

http://www.exisle.ne...showtopic=60170 (Bad Wolf)

http://www.exisle.ne...showtopic=60297 (Joe D'Monix)


QT

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#6 Nonny

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 12:44 PM

Which Jane Austen novel is your favorite, and why?    :)
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The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#7 QueenTiye

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 12:56 PM

View PostNonny, on Aug 22 2009, 01:44 PM, said:

Which Jane Austen novel is your favorite, and why?    :)

It's kinda a toss up between Emma and Pride & Prejudice.  I pretty much adore Elizabeth Bennett, but I also adore Mr. Knightley. I think too that I have more in common with Emma than with Elizabeth, shamed as I am to say so.  I was something of a busybody as a teen, and frequently misled as to who liked whom... and I have an abiding predilection for older men (my son's dad is 10 years older than me).  So, I guess I have to go with Emma.

The book that I like best for being surprised by it is Sense & Sensibility.  It was the one book I simply couldn't read as a teenager - long, ponderous and boring, I would start and then stop with it over and over.  As an adult, wanting another Jane Austen fix, I finally decided to dig a little harder with S&S, and found it a completely satisfying work.  Emma Thompson's portrayal in the movie was yet another revelation of what a treasure the book actually is.

QT

Edited by QueenTiye, 22 August 2009 - 01:00 PM.

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#8 Nonny

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 09:54 AM

View PostQueenTiye, on Aug 22 2009, 10:56 AM, said:

The book that I like best for being surprised by it is Sense & Sensibility.  It was the one book I simply couldn't read as a teenager - long, ponderous and boring, I would start and then stop with it over and over.  As an adult, wanting another Jane Austen fix, I finally decided to dig a little harder with S&S, and found it a completely satisfying work.  Emma Thompson's portrayal in the movie was yet another revelation of what a treasure the book actually is.
I also learned to appreciate S&S much later.  Have you read the journal Emma Thompson kept while writing and filming it?  I recommend it highly.   :)
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The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#9 SparkyCola

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 10:02 AM

Thanks for answering my questions :) I feel much the same way about art- it's a case of "I know what I like" - but I don't put any stock in the "Blank canvas with a blue square" type of things. And art that's deliberately ugly- yech. No way.

What kind of music do you like? Play any instruments? Any that you would like to be able to play?

Sparky
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#10 QueenTiye

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 03:12 PM

View PostNonny, on Aug 23 2009, 10:54 AM, said:

I also learned to appreciate S&S much later.  Have you read the journal Emma Thompson kept while writing and filming it?  I recommend it highly.   :)

I have not!  Do you know the name of the journal, so I can get it?  That sounds like interesting reading.

View PostSparkyCola, on Aug 23 2009, 11:02 AM, said:

Thanks for answering my questions :) I feel much the same way about art- it's a case of "I know what I like" - but I don't put any stock in the "Blank canvas with a blue square" type of things. And art that's deliberately ugly- yech. No way.

What kind of music do you like? Play any instruments? Any that you would like to be able to play?

Sparky

I like almost all kinds of music save heavy metal and classical.  In those genre there are isolated pieces that I like, but not enough to seek out.  Actually - I don't like most metallic or electronic sounding music, unless its in an r&b genre, and even there, I think its mostly familiarity and not real "like."  

My favorite kind of music is gospel, perhaps because I grew up singing in the choir.  I play the piano, poorly... which is my own fault.  My mother pleaded with me to keep up my lessons, and my piano teacher liked me, and thought I had talent.  But I didn't like him at all, and thought he was a tyrant. So when my year of trying it was up, I quit.  I regret it because sometimes I want to play a particular piece of music - there's something very different about being a part of the music rather than just listening to it... and I don't actually have the skill.  Time and money permitting, I will likely one day take lessons again.

QT

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#11 Nonny

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 05:11 PM

View PostQueenTiye, on Aug 23 2009, 01:12 PM, said:

View PostNonny, on Aug 23 2009, 10:54 AM, said:

I also learned to appreciate S&S much later.  Have you read the journal Emma Thompson kept while writing and filming it?  I recommend it highly.   :)

I have not!  Do you know the name of the journal, so I can get it?  That sounds like interesting reading.

Sense and Sensibility Screenplay and Diaries: Bringing Jane Austen's Novel to Film (Newmarket Pictorial Moviebooks)

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Bringing Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility to the screen was a labor of love for writer/actress Emma Thompson. The highly acclaimed film, nominated for seven Academy Awards® (winning Best Adapted Screenplay), appeared on more than 100 Top 10 lists across the country.

Featuring the complete award-winning script, Sense and Sensibility: The Screenplay and Diaries also showcases Thompson's unreserved, often hilarious diaries that capture the unique experience of making this landmark film. In addition, the book includes an introduction by producer Lindsay Doran; over fifty photos; cast and crew credits; and Thompson's sparkling Austen-like acceptance speech at the Golden Globe awards ceremony. Thompson's rare and personal perspective makes Sense and Sensibility: The Screenplay and Diaries an irresistible book for students of film and Austen devotees, as well as for everyone who loved this extraordinary movie. More than 50 black-and-white photos

Came across this at imdb.com while looking for the book link:

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Whilst working on the script for Sense and Sensibility, Emma's computer developed a problem and she was unable to locate the file. She took the computer to Stephen Fry, who after seven hours, finally managed to retrieve the script.
Yikes!    :eek4:   And I love Stephen Fry even more!     :love:
Posted Image


The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#12 QueenTiye

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 08:22 PM

Stephen Fry... :love: Another thing we have in common! :)

Thanks for the link.

QT

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#13 Shalamar

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 09:01 PM

Which are your favorite flowers?

Your favorite meal?

Time of the year?

How do you feel about thunderstorms?

Most interesting holiday memory?
The three most important R's
Respect for One's Self / Respect for Others / Responsibility for One's Words & Actions.

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#14 QueenTiye

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 10:11 PM

View PostShalamar, on Aug 23 2009, 10:01 PM, said:

Which are your favorite flowers?

:eek:  Favorite flowers?  I haven't a clue!  If you mean cut flowers, I don't have any favorites - I love lush colors especially very unique ones.  There are big giant sunflowerish looking red flowers when I get out of the subway every Thursday (farmer's market) - I love those.  If you mean in a garden, that's a different kind of question.  I actually have a Lifestyle thread to post about creating a garden almost exclusively of tall bushy flowering plants.  I want to know if it can be done, or if anyone has done it.  

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Your favorite meal?

I am, at this very moment, on a low-carb diet.  I do not much wish to think of my favorite meal - which is probably something along the lines of brown rice spaghetti, thick chunky rich meat sauce (turkey) heavy spiced with fresh peppers, and heavily sprinkled with Parmesan cheese...

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Time of the year?

Probably late spring, when it's just getting hot, but not yet humid... but when I have access to the beach - summertime. :)

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How do you feel about thunderstorms?

:hehe: Terrified of them.  Hide under something and cower afraid of them.  Except when on water.  I found that out when I was on the Hudson taking the ferry home in a horrific thunderstorm.  Lightening bolts crashing all around, sky to water - I thought it was wonderful.  

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Most interesting holiday memory?

I started celebrating Kwanzaa when I was 19 or 20.  Each year, I would do some various version of celebrating the holiday - the variation the result of not having much tradition with the holiday (Kwanzaa as a holiday is younger than me).  When I got married, my then-husband was very skeptical of Kwanzaa, but I went right along conducting Kwanzaa ceremonies each year anyway.  My son was born 4 years after I married, and we were still doing Kwanzaa, with varying degrees of enthusiasm.  I remember when my son was 5 of 6, and Kwanzaa was coming up - we had done nothing to prep for the holiday.  It was perhaps a year in which we were unenthusiastic - marriage in trouble, and we weren't much inclined toward celebrating anything at all... but my son got up and wanted to know when we were going to start prepping the house for Kwanzaa - and he had a look on his face that was exactly like the look you'd expect if there were some threat that Santa wasn't coming this year.  One look at his face at that moment changed my life.  Kwanzaa was no longer something we "did" - it was a family tradition.

QT

Een Draght Mackt Maght


#15 Lord of the Sword

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 10:59 PM

***Temporarily delurks***


What is your favorite color?

If you could chose any car to own, which one would it be and why?

What is your favorite thing about NYC?





***re-enters Lurk mode***
"Sometimes you get the point of the sword, sometimes the edge, sometimes the flat of the blade (even if you're the Lord of the Sword) and sometimes you're the guy wielding it. But any day without the Sword or its Lord is one that could've been better  " ~Orpheus.

The Left is inclusive, and tolerant, unless you happen to think and believe different than they do~ Lord of the Sword

Looks like the Liberal Elite of Exisle have finally managed to silence the last remaining Conservative voice on the board.

“The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots & tyrants. It is it’s natural manure.” ~Thomas Jefferson

#16 QueenTiye

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    Behavior is not reproducible over multiple trials.

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Posted 23 August 2009 - 11:20 PM

Note to self: Must find lots of new ways to convince LotS to delurk.

View PostLord of the Sword, on Aug 23 2009, 11:59 PM, said:

***Temporarily delurks***


What is your favorite color?

It depends on context. I like pink and green for clothes - all different kinds of pinks and all different kinds of green.  My dream car will be apple green, with a salmon pink interior. Eccentric, I know, but there you have it. In the home, I like the same colors, only richer - so more like  burgundy and forest green.

Quote

If you could chose any car to own, which one would it be and why?

I want one of those fuel-cell powered cars.

Or this:

Quote

What is your favorite thing about NYC?

***re-enters Lurk mode***

So many things!  Probably... Brooklyn... ;)  No seriously - it's midnight and this one will take a minute to reply to, and more thought, so I'll be back tomorrow with an answer.  (It will probably be some variation of "Brooklyn.")

QT

Een Draght Mackt Maght


#17 SparkyCola

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 09:44 AM

Random question: Do you have a favourite accent/s that you like?

Sparky
Able to entertain a thought without taking it home to meet the parents

#18 Shalamar

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    Last Star to the Left and Straight on till Morning

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 12:26 PM

What is your favorite movie?

If you could spend an afternoon chatting with someone - alive or dead, who would it be and why?
The three most important R's
Respect for One's Self / Respect for Others / Responsibility for One's Words & Actions.

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#19 Cardie

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    I'm a very *good* tailor

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 05:01 PM

I'm late into the thread to say that QT is much like her online self except that she just radiates fun and joy in person--or maybe that's just the effect of the cool jewelry on me.  Her thoughtfulness online might disguise that part of her personality.

Cardie
Nothing succeeds like excess.

#20 Anna

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 05:07 PM

What does "Indentured Servant T minus 3.5" in your sig mean? I've been wanting to ask you that for a long time.
Seldom do we regret words we do not speak.

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Amendment X: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: OT'er of the week, QueenTiye, 2009

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