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RIP robust public option

Health Care Public Option 2009

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#41 Palisades

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 05:44 PM

Here's a report corroborating that the House lacks the votes for a robust public option.
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#42 Shalamar

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 05:54 PM

Specs, a politician ( four letter word!!!) go down fighting? Never, why? when one can sell out so handily.
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#43 Vapor Trails

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 11:10 AM

link

Quote

WASHINGTON – After months of struggle, House Democrats unveiled sweeping legislation Thursday to extend health care coverage to millions who lack it and create a new option of government-run insurance. A vote is likely next week on the plan patterned closely on President Barack Obama's own.

Speaking on the steps of the U.S. Capitol, Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Congress was "on the cusp of delivering on the promise of making affordable, quality health insurance available to every American — and laying the foundation for a brighter future for generations to come."

Officials said the measure, once fully phased in over several years, would extend coverage to 96 percent of Americans. Its principal mechanism is creation of a new government-regulated insurance "exchange" where private companies could sell policies in competition with the government. Federal subsidies would be available to millions of lower-income individuals and families to help them afford the policies.

The ceremony marked a pivotal moment in Democrats' yearlong attempt to answer Obama's call for legislation to remake the nation's health care system by extending insurance, ending industry practices such as denying coverage on the basis of pre-existing medical conditions, and slowing the growth of medical spending nationwide.

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#44 Vapor Trails

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 11:12 AM

My opinion about the above?

I'll believe it when I see it. :suspect: People like to talk up a LOT of bullsh!t. :suspect:

Edited by Ghost Rider, 29 October 2009 - 11:13 AM.

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Politicians are like bananas; they hang together, they're all yellow, and there's not a straight one among them.

"We're relevant for $ and a vote once every two years. Beyond that, we're completely irrelevant, except of course to consume, and preach the gospel according to [insert political demigod here]."--Cait

#45 Palisades

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 11:17 AM

^ From later in the article:

Quote

Liberals generally wanted the government to dictate the rates to be paid to doctors, hospitals and other health care providers, with the fee levels linked to Medicare.

Moderates, fearing the impact on their local hospitals, held out for negotiated rates between the government and private insurers — and won.

I assume the AP meant for that second sentence to be something like: "negotiated rates between the government and health care providers".

Edited by Palisade, 29 October 2009 - 11:24 AM.

"When the Fed is the bartender everybody drinks until they fall down." —Paul McCulley

"In truth, 'too big to fail' is not the worst thing we should fear – our financial institutions are now on their way to becoming 'too big to save'." —Simon Johnson

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#46 Spectacles

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 07:07 PM

RIP robust public option is right.

And the taxpayers lose. Folks at Firedoglake have been leading the charge for the robust PO. They do lots of homework in the process. Here's a post explaining why the Medicare + 5 public option would have been cheaper than the weakened public option that the House passed, which the so-called fiscally conservative Blue Dogs preferred and won:

http://seminal.fired...com/diary/11713

I read somewhere else today that the Blue Dog support of the option more costly to taxpayers (and beneficial to insurers) illustrates how today, in both parties, "fiscal conservative" simply means pro-business.

In this deal, the taxpayers get less bang for our bucks, but insurers get some relief. Good for them, at our expense.
"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman

#47 Spectacles

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 07:18 PM

This is kinda funny--in an exasperating way. Way to go, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina!

http://www.newsobser...ory/161435.html


Quote

Maybe it was just lousy timing, but many customers of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina are ticked off at the mail they've received recently from the state's largest insurer.

First, they learned their rates will rise by an average of 11 percent next year.

Next, they opened a slick flier from the insurer urging them to send an enclosed pre-printed, postage-paid note to Sen. Kay Hagan denouncing what the company says is unfair competition that would be imposed by a government-backed insurance plan. The so-called public option is likely to be considered by Congress in the health-care overhaul debate.


"No matter what you call it, if the federal government intervenes in the private health insurance market, it's a slippery slope to a single-payer system," the BCBS flier read. "Who wants that?"

Plenty of people, it turns out.

Indignant Blue Cross customers have rebelled against the insurer's message, complaining that their premium dollars have funded such a campaign.

They've hit the Internet in a flurry of e-mails to friends and neighbors throughout the state. They've called Hagan's office to voice support for a public option. They've marked through the Blue Cross message on their postcards to instead vouch support, then dropped them in the mail -- in at least one case taped to a brick -- to be paid on Blue Cross' dime. Or dimes.

"I hope it backfires," said Mark Barroso, a documentary film maker in Chatham County who is a Blue Cross customer and recipient of the mailings. "I'm doing everything I can to make sure it does."

Barroso said his friends and neighbors have united to subvert the insurer's message. Residents of a neighborhood in Durham have lit up an online chat room with discussion of little else.

"I went sort of bonkers," said Beth Silberman of Durham. "You're hostage to them, and then they pull this. My new premiums are funding lobbying against competition. It's pretty disgusting."

"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman

#48 QueenTiye

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 10:04 PM

That's easily the best story in a while... :)

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#49 cade

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 01:23 AM

View PostQueenTiye, on Oct 26 2009, 10:47 PM, said:

View Postcade, on Oct 26 2009, 10:51 PM, said:

I personally find Booman's analysis a little strained and unpersuasive, but still reasonable. He could be right, though I think Obama is just really good at getting progressives to think he is one of them. If we go by Occam's Razor, then I think the answer would be Obama simply wanted to get whatever bill was most likely to pass, that he wanted the PO but not if it hurt even slightly the odds of final passage. If Obama supported the PO but nonetheless believed it was too risky a bet, that would explain why he was not helping Reid and Pelosi whip votes.

I guess in the sense of progressive sentiment, Obama is progressive, but from what I've seen of progressives, I'm at a loss to know why anyone ever thought that - and it seems that people have short memories.  I haven't forgotten that "real progressives" were not at all behind Obama during the primaries.  One reason why I'm a fan of Bob Cesca is because of his early, rallying call for the "netroots" to endorse then Senator Obama.  He was largely alone then.

QT

They think Obama is with them because, imo, as he once wrote: "I serve as a blank screen on which people of vastly different political stripes project their own views." And because he ran to Clinton's left knowing he'd need the "netroots." They supported him about 9:1 vs. Clinton. Some, like the bloggers at OpenLeft, only did so to defeat Clinton, but most were and remain true believers. Obama's administration still maintains contact with them (as for example the conference call with Obama that Booman was included in) and sends signals now and then meant to reaffirm support.

#50 Spectacles

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 06:39 AM

View PostQueenTiye, on Oct 29 2009, 11:04 PM, said:

That's easily the best story in a while... :)

QT

Isn't that just amazing! :D

And infuriating. In their defense, insurers point to modest profits. Well, those profits would be considerably higher if they wouldn't spend so much money on lobbying and on administrative perks.
"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman

#51 Balderdash

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 08:25 AM

View PostSpectacles, on Oct 29 2009, 05:18 PM, said:

This is kinda funny--in an exasperating way. Way to go, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina!

http://www.newsobser...ory/161435.html


Quote

Maybe it was just lousy timing, but many customers of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina are ticked off at the mail they've received recently from the state's largest insurer.

First, they learned their rates will rise by an average of 11 percent next year.

Next, they opened a slick flier from the insurer urging them to send an enclosed pre-printed, postage-paid note to Sen. Kay Hagan denouncing what the company says is unfair competition that would be imposed by a government-backed insurance plan. The so-called public option is likely to be considered by Congress in the health-care overhaul debate.


"No matter what you call it, if the federal government intervenes in the private health insurance market, it's a slippery slope to a single-payer system," the BCBS flier read. "Who wants that?"

Plenty of people, it turns out.

Indignant Blue Cross customers have rebelled against the insurer's message, complaining that their premium dollars have funded such a campaign.

They've hit the Internet in a flurry of e-mails to friends and neighbors throughout the state. They've called Hagan's office to voice support for a public option. They've marked through the Blue Cross message on their postcards to instead vouch support, then dropped them in the mail -- in at least one case taped to a brick -- to be paid on Blue Cross' dime. Or dimes.

"I hope it backfires," said Mark Barroso, a documentary film maker in Chatham County who is a Blue Cross customer and recipient of the mailings. "I'm doing everything I can to make sure it does."

Barroso said his friends and neighbors have united to subvert the insurer's message. Residents of a neighborhood in Durham have lit up an online chat room with discussion of little else.

"I went sort of bonkers," said Beth Silberman of Durham. "You're hostage to them, and then they pull this. My new premiums are funding lobbying against competition. It's pretty disgusting."




I certainly hope that this winds up working against the insurance industry and that people see what is going on.  It really is out of our hands though it seems, the "People" don't seem to count anymore.  I wonder what we need to do to count again...

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#52 Omega

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 09:23 AM

Vote out every incumbent.

#53 Palisades

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 09:44 AM

I'm kind of wondering...why is a government-run public option that has to negotiate with medical providers (rather than dictating prices) deemed not 'robust'? It couldn't be because those on the left doubt its ability to compete with private insurance, could it?

Edited by Palisade, 30 October 2009 - 09:45 AM.

"When the Fed is the bartender everybody drinks until they fall down." —Paul McCulley

"In truth, 'too big to fail' is not the worst thing we should fear – our financial institutions are now on their way to becoming 'too big to save'." —Simon Johnson

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TWP / An Affirming Flame / Solar Wind / Palisade

#54 Nittany Lioness

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 10:14 AM

"... it's a slippery slope to a single-payer system," the BCBS flier read. "Who wants that?"
Plenty of people, it turns out.
...  "You're hostage to them, and then they pull this. My new premiums are funding lobbying against competition."

Which do they want, again?   :tired:

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#55 Spectacles

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 04:28 PM

AP reports that the public option, as presented in the House bill, will cover only 2%:

http://www.talkleft....10/31/14634/952
"Facts are stupid things." -Ronald Reagan at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things"

"Although health care enrollment is actually going pretty well at this point, thousands and maybe millions of Americans have failed to sign up for coverage because they believe the false horror stories they keep hearing." -- Paul Krugman



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