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OTer of the week

OT'er of the week ObsidianStorm13 2010

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#1 Godeskian

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 02:17 AM

Welcome to our latest OTer of the Week, ObsidianStorm13

And yes, I know I'm like a week late with this. Mea culpa.

Quote

(Rules)
Here are the rules which should typically be appended to the new thread:

1. The current OTer of the Week chooses the next OTer of the week and starts a thread in their honor.
2. That person's week in the spotlight runs from Monday to Sunday, after which a new OTotW takes over.
3. To keep this interesting please choose someone with whom you typically disagree here on OT, and also someone you don't know well. We'd hate to see it get clubby.
4. Current OTotW should set about picking a successor within a few days in case the search for a new OTotW takes awhile. And also so that person can prepare and write a brief bio like this week's OTer of the week did below.
5. Have fun, and LEARN about each other.

Quote

I was born and raised in and around Buffalo NY for the first 27 years of my life. I emigrated to the UK after meeting my husband; I'll have been living in England a year at the end of May. Man, time flies! I am enjoying the English countryside, however I dislike the sheep. I have a B. A. in English Literature from the University at Buffalo and I am four classes away from B. A. in Psychology. I love all things Shakespeare especially films. I'm big into modern adaptations of his works. I would really like to teach young children as that is where my passion truly lies; I absolutely adore small children. I appreciate the innocence and honesty they live by. I still like to think that I possess some of their energy and innocence as well.

My hobbies include reading a lot of books and I write albeit not very well on the side. I am a pretty crafty person; I make beaded jewelry and draw when I find the peace and quiet to do so. I play D and D and Magic the gathering when I can find people willing to play and put up with my casual approach to the games; I'm more of a do first think later sort of person which gets me into some interesting predicaments in and out of game. I usually manage to stay alive and not upset too many people in the process. I love theatre; especially musical theatre(and yes it's an re for theatre because it looks prettier). I have performed in several productions, either in high school or as part of an amateur theatre group. My latest was Little Shop of Horrors in Marsden. My husband helped control the giant people-eating plant. I was just in the chorus but I loved it. So that's pretty much it. Ask your questions everyone!

All right then, I'll kick off with a question too. You said you moved to the UK after meeting your husband. What was your first impression of the Brits when you landed, and has it improved or got worse since?

Defy Gravity!


The Doctor: The universe is big. It's vast and complicated and ridiculous and sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles... and that's a theory. Nine hundred years and I've never seen one yet, but this will do me.


#2 obsidianstorm13

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 04:21 AM

Wow good question.  My first impression outside my inlaws(which was a good one because I am living with my mother-in-law) was why don't Americans have pubs!?  They took me to a local pub and I had a really good time.  I have never liked bars for the fact that you can't hear anything!  Pubs are nicer and mostly quieter by far(and the one that's near us is a free house so you get interesting delicious beers if you like that sort of thing)  Then I started working at a local shop(The Co-operative) and people there just kept making fun of my accent.  I have noticed that a lot of people are very reserved over here-when I'm serving customers; they rarely every answer my how are you?  It takes them a few times of visiting.  It's like they don't expect a complete stranger to care let alone be nice to them.  All in all my opinion on most Brits is that they are a good people.  They have the same crooked politician issues we have in America... and I love the NHS even for all of it's waiting... I think 2 weeks for a hospital referral for a test is pretty darn good since I've waited months in the States.  I do wish people would let me pronounce my words the way I know though.  I don't mind the ribbing but I am 28 and lived most of my life in the States- it's zuchini, and tomaedo and Baesil and eggplant guys!  Oh and we definitely have candy!  Not sweets!

#3 Balthamos

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 04:22 AM

Quote

I do wish people would let me pronounce my words the way I know though.

Not gonna happen... :p :wink:

#4 obsidianstorm13

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 04:24 AM

Quiet you... I know where you live(lol)!  For those of you who don't know, Balth is my husband!

#5 SparkyCola

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 06:17 AM

Lol - you hate sheep just like Balth? How did you two meet (I'm vaguely wondering if you bonded over a mutual hatred of sheep, or if that just served to strengthen the relationship!)

What are your musical tastes and do you play any instruments?

And what are your ambitions (in general, not just career-wise)?

Thanks :D Great choice, Gode :)

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#6 obsidianstorm13

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 06:33 AM

Balth and I met due to a tragedy actually... a friend of mine passed away September 2008.  She was a large part of the gaming community in Buffalo(she ran a larp for over 10 years or something like that it might have been more) so I left work early and went back to my UB campus hangout to make sure people had heard the sad news.  He was there.. he distracted me by playing Mao with a bunch of us.  That's how it began.  My dislike of sheep stems from the few that sat outside our window bleating until all hours of the night whilst trying to reset my body clock to UK time.  I think it would be neat to own sheep and spin yarn.  Balth doesn't really agree.  

I am a true eclectic when it comes to music... I love an artist or two from almost every genre.  I even like the dreaded hip-hop stuff that most people cringe at.  Mind you it's a very small selection from that genre but I still enjoy it.  

I can play a very limited amount on the piano.  I played the flute for a year and hand chimes.  I mostly sing.  I can read music though which is strange.  I was thinking about learning the violin so I can fiddle!

General ambitions include becoming a mom someday, traveling the world when I can(I would like to visit New Zealand, Hawaii, go back to San Francisco, Italy, France, Switzerland, Tibet if possible).  I love adventures so I'm always up for exploring.  I would also like to finish one novel.  It may never be a bestseller and that's fine but I want to say I actually finished one.

#7 ilexx

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 10:31 AM

Hello! *waves*

Two questions come to mind (mine, anyway ;)):

What do you miss the most about the US?

What kind of a novel would you like to write?

#8 BklnScott

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 11:21 AM

Quote

I have a B. A. in English Literature from the University at Buffalo

So do I.  Who was your favorite professor, and what did s/he teach? Did Anna Kay France still teach playwriting when you were there?  Favorite author(s) and/or periods?

Whereabouts in Buffalo did you grow up, and how do you like Western New York?  (In general and by comparison to the English countryside).

Edited by BklnScott, 16 March 2010 - 11:21 AM.

Quote

There isn't enough mommy in the world to further a cause like yours!

#9 Cait

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 11:58 AM

View Postobisidianstorm13, on Mar 16 2010, 02:24 AM, said:

Quiet you... I know where you live(lol)!  For those of you who don't know, Balth is my husband!

LOL, thanks for telling me that, because I didn't know. I didn't even suspect.

How did you fine EI?  What's your favorite thing to do on EI?  What is your favorite thing to do in the UK [besides the normal husband and wife stuff, you know what I mean?]?

Lately, hello.  We don't really know each other much at all, but I'm delighted to meet you and am looking forward to the answers that come out in this thread.  :)

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#10 Nonny

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 12:11 PM

What are your favorite Shakespeare modern adaptation films?  

What kind of songs do you like to sing?  What's your range?  

What kind of beaded jewelry do you make?  Do you ever use Swarovski crystal beads?
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The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

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Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#11 Nonny

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 12:15 PM

View PostBalthamos, on Mar 16 2010, 02:22 AM, said:

Quote

I do wish people would let me pronounce my words the way I know though.

Not gonna happen... :p :wink:
Word!     :rolleyes:
Posted Image


The once and future Nonny

"Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank, give a man a bank and he can rob the world." Can anyone tell me who I am quoting?  I found this with no attribution.

Fatal miscarriages are forever.

Stupid is stupid, this I believe. And ignorance is the worst kind of stupid, since ignorance is a choice.  Suzanne Brockmann

All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone's feelings. Diderot

#12 obsidianstorm13

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 04:55 PM

At Cait:  Nice to meet you too.  Balth is to blame for bringing me here.  I really like discussing everything in OT.  I don't really understand a lot about politics and I figure it's a good way to get a well-rounded idea of the issues and debates among the different political ideologies.  I am a firm believer in the idea that you can always learn from others.  

Ilexx:  I miss American peanut butter, my family and my friends.  And wings... yum!  I can't wait for my wings.  Oh and hockey-I love me my Buffalo Sabres.  
As for my novel, it's sort of a conglomeration of sci-fi, fantasy and mystery all rolled into one.

Blknscott:  No way!  Small world.  I loved Bono and Stevens.  I never had France and I don't think she is there anymore.  Oh well.  I never got a chance to take playwriting courses.  I was too caught up with Shakespeare.  I really like Chaucer and John Donne too.  I would have to say those are my top three favorite time periods.  I grew up in Lancaster, Depew and Hamburg, all equally lovely but they don't compare to the English countryside.  I can walk places without the fear of being run over because we have sidewalks to walk on!  I do miss seeing Lake Erie from my mother's bedroom though.  

Nonny:  I love Branagh anything.  They are all really good but not a "modern adaptation" , Romeo and Juliet-Baz's is fantastic-I wrote a paper on it and received an A which tells you how much I like the darn movie.  10 Things I Hate About You is also really good.  Internal Affairs another really good adaptation of Othello.  It's fantastic.  

I'm technically an Alto although I have been told that I have range of a soprano-it's not comfortable for me to sing high so I don't.  Well-I rock out on Rockband with Balth and Godeskian.  I have been in choruses and I sing on stage so whatever show we are doing, I'm singing.  I love Les Miserables and if I ever get the opportunity to even audition for it I will consider it a blessing.  

My beaded jewelry consists of making little beaded flower necklaces-I have found that although I enjoy the crystals they are really expensive as is jewelry making in general so when i earn more money than what I make now-I'll probably make more intricate stuff-I have some really nice patterns that cost quite a bit to get all the components for.  Shame really!

#13 Rhea

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 07:51 PM

Quote

Nonny: I love Branagh anything. They are all really good but not a "modern adaptation" , Romeo and Juliet-Baz's is fantastic-I wrote a paper on it and received an A which tells you how much I like the darn movie. 10 Things I Hate About You is also really good. Internal Affairs another really good adaptation of Othello. It's fantastic.

Interesting how tastes differ, isn't it? I love Shakespeare, and I like Branagh's. There are some of Shakespeare's plays that I seriously dislike modern adaptations of, but I liked his Hamlet - I thought it was a great idea to set it during the early Victorian period, and it was much more colorful than most Hamlets; I also loved Ian McKellan's Richard III (I liked it better on stage than in the movie version) - playing Richard III as Hitler was, I thought, brilliant (although it played into the historical inaccuracy of Richard as some kind of monster) - Ian McKellan is electric on stage - it's hard to watch anyone else because his performances are so vivid - and he's not a ham by any means. I didn't care for Baz's Romeo and Juliet - Zefrelli's was my gold standard. I loved Branagh's Othello and thought Lawrence Fishburne was brilliant - and what a treat to actually have Othello played by a black man. ;)

Edited by Rhea, 16 March 2010 - 07:52 PM.

The future is better than the past. Despite the crepehangers, romanticists, and anti-intellectuals, the world steadily grows better because the human mind, applying itself to environment, makes it better. With hands...with tools...with horse sense and science and engineering.
- Robert A. Heinlein

When I don’t understand, I have an unbearable itch to know why. - RAH


Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen.  - RAH

#14 obsidianstorm13

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 03:55 AM

I got to see that version once when I was so sick and I was hallucinating.  I need to see it again.  I saw Olivier's version and I remember looking at Desdemona going I know that face and then I was like "holy crap it's Dame Maggie Smith"  All young and with beautiful red hair!  It was crazy!  

PBC had a BBC special presentation of a modern version of King Lear... the set was cubic and done in black and white that's it.  Sir Ian Holm played the king and it was fantastic!  I haven't been able to find a copy of it to buy.  I want it.  

I liked Lurhmann's Romeo and Juliet because I liked the visual modernization but the keeping of the language.  All the swirling colors everywhere, the busy nightlife; it was stunning and bizarre with the older language but then it makes a statement I think that the language isn't that difficult to overcome.  There are some criticisms I have mainly the diminishing of Juliet's lines but whatever.

#15 Captain Jack

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 01:16 AM

Hi, how hard was it to move to another country?  How long did it take to get used to it?  Was it easy to adjust or difficult?  What are some of the differences that struck you the most, and what similarities did you find that made things easier?
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#16 obsidianstorm13

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 06:24 AM

Hi Captain Jack:  Yes it is hard to move to another country.  Stressful really.  I would highly recommend doing it if given the opportunity,even if it's just for a year.  You learn so much from the experience.  I think moving to an English speaking country helped.  I didn't have to worry about trying to learn a new language on top of adjusting to a new country.  I will say the hardest thing for me was leaving everyone behind. My whole family still lives back in the States.  I have my husband and my in-laws here.  Thank God I love them all.  

I think I am still getting used to part of it.  I'm pretty adaptable and I'm quite outgoing so it makes meeting people quite easy but on the other hand, it's still a different culture and different rules apply.   I have friends but no really close friends yet.  I think over time that will change.  I did spend all of my life in and around the same area of Buffalo.  I have known my best friend since I was 10.   I also don't drink nearly as often as everyone over here seems to do.  I mean it's not like everyone is a bunch raving drunks(which is a stereotype that a lot of people seem to have) but it's more common to have a drink with a meal when you go out for tea.  It's more common to go meet friends a local club( I go to the Conservative club out here) on friday, saturday and have a few drinks.  I mean it's not just the young-it's every age where in America it's more the young that go out to the dance clubs and the bars.  Most of the time, the older crowd stays home and has a few friends over.  
  I think a lot of the differences people try and exaggerate actually; I think everyone wants their culture to stand out more than everyone else's but in reality it's just not true.  Obviously accents and different words.  They use their knife all the time when they eat; it stays in their hand.  Public transportation and health services are vastly different.  But in the end, we are all people; the same complaints about politicians occur the same complaining about working etc.  I've found that to be the most reassuring thing; that while it's a different country and slightly different system, people are still people and do people things.  They go out on Friday and Saturday and have a good time.  People still complain about being asked for ID.  They still have their loyalities, go nutty over there team sports, etc.  

I think as a general rule the fish tastes nicer over here, even the cheap frozen stuff.

#17 Cait

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 07:44 PM

View Postobisidianstorm13, on Mar 16 2010, 02:55 PM, said:

At Cait:  Nice to meet you too.  Balth is to blame for bringing me here.  I really like discussing everything in OT.  I don't really understand a lot about politics and I figure it's a good way to get a well-rounded idea of the issues and debates among the different political ideologies.  I am a firm believer in the idea that you can always learn from others.  

Ilexx:  I miss American peanut butter, my family and my friends.  And wings... yum!  I can't wait for my wings.  Oh and hockey-I love me my Buffalo Sabres.  
As for my novel, it's sort of a conglomeration of sci-fi, fantasy and mystery all rolled into one.

Blknscott:  No way!  Small world.  I loved Bono and Stevens.  I never had France and I don't think she is there anymore.  Oh well.  I never got a chance to take playwriting courses.  I was too caught up with Shakespeare.  I really like Chaucer and John Donne too.  I would have to say those are my top three favorite time periods.  I grew up in Lancaster, Depew and Hamburg, all equally lovely but they don't compare to the English countryside.  I can walk places without the fear of being run over because we have sidewalks to walk on!  I do miss seeing Lake Erie from my mother's bedroom though.  

Nonny:  I love Branagh anything.  They are all really good but not a "modern adaptation" , Romeo and Juliet-Baz's is fantastic-I wrote a paper on it and received an A which tells you how much I like the darn movie.  10 Things I Hate About You is also really good.  Internal Affairs another really good adaptation of Othello.  It's fantastic.  

I'm technically an Alto although I have been told that I have range of a soprano-it's not comfortable for me to sing high so I don't.  Well-I rock out on Rockband with Balth and Godeskian.  I have been in choruses and I sing on stage so whatever show we are doing, I'm singing.  I love Les Miserables and if I ever get the opportunity to even audition for it I will consider it a blessing.  

My beaded jewelry consists of making little beaded flower necklaces-I have found that although I enjoy the crystals they are really expensive as is jewelry making in general so when i earn more money than what I make now-I'll probably make more intricate stuff-I have some really nice patterns that cost quite a bit to get all the components for.  Shame really!

I was just going to comment and say thanks to the part directed to me, but I found this all to be so interesting I wanted to thank you for sharing everything you've said here.  I'm so glad you agreed to do this, because I've indeed learned so much about you.  All of it fascinating!  :D

Rules for surviving an Autocracy:

Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
Rule#5: Don't make compromises.
Rule#6: Remember the future.

Source:
http://www2.nybooks....r-survival.html


#18 obsidianstorm13

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 05:04 AM

:blush: Aww Shucks!  I'm blushing Cait.  You're welcome.  I figured doing this would be a good way to get to know more people on Ex Isle.  It has worked so far.

#19 Rhea

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 07:10 AM

View Postobisidianstorm13, on Mar 17 2010, 01:55 AM, said:

I got to see that version once when I was so sick and I was hallucinating.  I need to see it again.  I saw Olivier's version and I remember looking at Desdemona going I know that face and then I was like "holy crap it's Dame Maggie Smith"  All young and with beautiful red hair!  It was crazy!  

PBC had a BBC special presentation of a modern version of King Lear... the set was cubic and done in black and white that's it.  Sir Ian Holm played the king and it was fantastic!  I haven't been able to find a copy of it to buy.  I want it.  

I liked Lurhmann's Romeo and Juliet because I liked the visual modernization but the keeping of the language.  All the swirling colors everywhere, the busy nightlife; it was stunning and bizarre with the older language but then it makes a statement I think that the language isn't that difficult to overcome.  There are some criticisms I have mainly the diminishing of Juliet's lines but whatever.

I love most of Olivier's adaptations. And I loved Derek Jacobi's Hamlet. And I loved Olivier's last performance for the BBC as King Lear. I remember seeing an interview somewhere where he said he'd played Lear when he was younger, but wanted to do it again now that he WAS Lear.
The future is better than the past. Despite the crepehangers, romanticists, and anti-intellectuals, the world steadily grows better because the human mind, applying itself to environment, makes it better. With hands...with tools...with horse sense and science and engineering.
- Robert A. Heinlein

When I don’t understand, I have an unbearable itch to know why. - RAH


Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen.  - RAH

#20 Mark

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Posted 19 March 2010 - 07:20 AM

obisidianstorm13:

Quote

I was thinking about learning the violin so I can fiddle!

Mark: You're married now...so no fiddling around.  ;)
Mark
Discussion is an exchange of knowledge: argument is an exchange of ignorance.
Peace is not the absence of conflict, but the ability to cope with it.
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