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Amazing animals


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#21 Hambil

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Posted 18 May 2011 - 11:10 PM

This also confirms my theory that the oldest human instinct is 'poke it with a stick'.

#22 M.E.

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 01:41 PM

These two pictures MAX OUT my "creepy beyond measurement" scale.

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I find I have a problem using TinEye for information on the site that I frequently get pics from.  I suppose it is because they are newly posted pics each day.  I always get the "no information found" and even if I use TinEye to search for info a few days later on the pic that I copied, it only leads back to my computer file. :shrug:

I guess if I were ambitious enough I could go back a few days later, to the site that I copied them from originally, but, it would mean way too much time searching through hundreds of pics.

#23 Orpheus

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 11:28 AM

Since arachnids freak you out, here's something to calm you down:

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Saltoblattella montistabularis aka the "leaproach"
Though previously jumping roaches were only known to exist in the late Jurassic [which just got a bit creepier, wouldn't you say?), this cockroach, discovered last year on Table Mountain outside Capetown is heavily optimized for straight vertical leap, and can leap horizontally about as well as a grasshopper. Many consider it 'gross', but really, why is a jumping cockroach any grosser than any other leaping bug?

#24 M.E.

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 11:53 AM

^^^Because it's a roach!  :freakingout2:

They are right up there on my "creepy beyond measurement" list.  As a matter of fact, I would say they run neck and neck with spiders. :freakoutnonny:

It was a valiant effort, Orpheus.  Thank you.......I think? :suspect:

#25 Orpheus

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 12:34 PM

View Postmichael elizabeth, on 26 May 2011 - 11:53 AM, said:

They are right up there on my "creepy beyond measurement" list.  As a matter of fact, I would say they run neck and neck with spiders. :freakoutnonny:

It was a valiant effort, Orpheus.  Thank you.......I think? :suspect:
Sorry, if I'd known it would equally freak you, I'd have posted Caerostris darwini (Darwin's bark spider) instead. For the same creep factor, you get a much cooler bug. It builds the largest known orb-webs with bridgelines up to 25m (82 ft) or more across rivers and lakes, and its silk has an average toughness of 250 MJ/m, with some samples testing at 520 MJ/m -- more than twice the strength of any other spider silk, and more than ten times a corresponding strand of Kevlar™. Imagine walking into one of *those* at night.

Or don't -- as you prefer.

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#26 M.E.

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 01:22 PM

:lol: Believe it or not, I've come a long way.

There was a time when I could not even look at a picture of a spider.  I remember reading a National Geographic magazine when I was 22 years old and coming across a picture of a Taranchula.  I could not even work up enough courage to turn the page. :D

I know I could never hold one in my hand but, I can look at one now.  As long as there is some type of barrier in-between us.

#27 JarDogBox

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 02:25 AM

My Dad took me fishing once when I was very young.  We took no bait.  He said we would get some Helgarmmites at the creek and use them.  I had never heard of these or seem them before.  We started flipping over rocks by the shore and ultimately we found a bunch of these.  I was horrified!  I had been wading there barefoot a week before.  Had I known there were 'monsters' living under the rocks I would never have even gone in the water.  After that I always had rubber boots or waders on.  This was the first time my Father pulled something out of the river that shocked me.  Helgarmmites are the larva of Dobsonfly.

The 2nd time my Dad pulled something out of the river was again a fishing trip.  He caught a Gar fish.  I had never seen anything so wicked come out of the river before!  I just never went swimming/wading in the water at all after that.    

I had nightmares where if the Halgarmmites did not get me the Garfish did!  :fear:

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#28 M.E.

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 10:35 AM

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#29 Orpheus

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 10:43 AM

Note the maturity of the brood, yet they are apparently still dependent on Mom/Pop for food.

It's an utterly brilliant safe comfortable nesting location that probably had the other birds slapping themselves "Why didn't I think of that?" -- but not such a great staging point to teach the babies to stretch their wings and fly. Which, I'm guessing, they didn't.

The trick to parenting is remembering that you are ONLY preparing them to leave the nest.

#30 M.E.

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 12:03 PM

Ahhh, but if you think about it in terms of the way our world is today It makes sense.  :lol:

http://azstarnet.com...3ca4a469d8.html

It makes sense to me that with our encroachment of habitat/resources all over the world, wildlife have fewer options.  Much like our own offspring. :)

Edited by michael elizabeth, 02 June 2011 - 12:07 PM.


#31 Orpheus

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 12:08 PM

That's a trend I've decried since I was myself a child (though those days seem an era of idyllic freedom for children now, they were nothing near as free as the 1950s -- and the roots of the trend were evident even as far back as the child labor movement and Estes Kefauver's hearings on Georgia Tann). See also: the thread I just started in OT on schools vs prisons.

#32 M.E.

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 04:09 PM

I decided it doesn't belong here.  The only amazing part was the price. Sorry

Edited by michael elizabeth, 04 June 2011 - 04:15 PM.


#33 M.E.

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 05:35 PM



#34 M.E.

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 07:46 AM

Himalayan goats




#35 M.E.

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 09:26 AM

I wonder if it bites people?



#36 M.E.

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 02:20 PM

Some of these animals are high up on the intelligence scale.  I wonder....  Do you think they are aware of what is happening to them?



#37 M.E.

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 09:23 AM

Is this common?  I had no idea lobsters varied, to this degree in this color.

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#38 M.E.

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 04:57 PM

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That is so :cool: .

#39 Orpheus

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 12:16 AM

Based on my observations of cats/dogs who enjoy beer, I think they know quite well what "drunk" is. I don't know any animals that drink liquor, though. Not even my briefly embezzling cat.

There are blue lobster-type animals, but with Homarus americanus, the blue was said to result from an absence of other pigments like red astaxanthin (which normally combine to a drab greenish brown) much as the disappearance of green chlorophyll unmasks autumn colors that were there all along. However, recent research, perhaps aided by the availability of blue crayfish for the home aquarium market, suggests that the blue is really due to excess production of a protein (crustacyanin) that binds astaxanthin [a normally red pigment] and turns it blue. If the "autumn" mutant exists, it would be exteemely rare. Ironically astaxanthin NON-producers are apparently red when live. Red, yellow and albino lobsters are even rarer than blue; not to mention the half-and-half genetic mosaics (as in Dick Tracy, sometimes the two halves are even different genders). All the common mutants --if you can call 1 in 3-4 Million (blue) or more "common*-- turn red when cooked. Only albinos don't.

The coolest thing about that sea horse is: it's male.

#40 M.E.

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 12:57 AM

View PostOrpheus, on 27 June 2011 - 12:16 AM, said:

The coolest thing about that sea horse is: it's male.

I knew that already. :D

The rest I was not aware of.  Thank you, Orpheus.


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