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Godzilla Millenium Films

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#1 Virgil Vox

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 11:07 PM

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So I know that I am horribly late to the party when it comes to these films but as far as I’m aware they weren’t discussed on the board so I feel okay starting a new topic. I’m not sure what made me decide to watch the films. I was just browsing the sci-fi section at Hastings and they had quite a few Godzilla movies and I liked the cover to Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla and decided to give the films a try. I’ve never been a big Godzilla fan. I’ve seen the original film and the American remake, as well as the American cartoon series, and that’s about it. So I was pretty much a newbie as I started watching the Millennium films. I knew that each one was a self-contained story(apart from the Mechagodzilla films)so it didn’t matter too much which order I watched them in. So I’ll review them in the order that I watched them.

I will admit that I haven’t watched Godzilla 2000 yet. The only reason being is that the Japanese language track isn’t on there so I can either have English or French dubbed and I hate dubbed movies. I’d rather hear the original language and read sub-titles. I will probably buy this movie and suck it up because I want to own all of the Millennium films and who knows? Maybe the dubbing won’t be that bad. And I’m pretty sure I’ll get used to it as the movie plays.
Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla was the first movie I watched. Overall, I liked it. Mechagodzilla, or Kiryu as they call it in the film, is a great kaiju and his battles against Godzilla were amazing. Honestly, if they had gotten rid of the scientist and his daughter and focused more on Akane I would have liked this film a lot more. But those two characters don’t drag it down too much.

I thought this was a good first film to start with. Godzilla attacked and was subsequently killed back in 1954. Japan has been attacked by other large monsters since then and has developed means to combat them. Then another Godzilla shows up and stomps around Japan, forcing the Japanese government to take drastic measures. Those measures being using the bones of the original Godzilla to create Mechagodzilla.

The movie wasted no time in having Godzilla show up, which was fine with me. I was ready to see the big guy start smashing stuff up. His introduction was pretty cool, coming up in a giant wave behind a reporter in the middle of a hurricane. Godzilla has arrived.

Like I said above, the scientist and his daughter annoyed me to no end. The daughter was just too cute for her own good, and the scientist was a little stalker-ish with how he kept trying to date Akane even though she’s half his age. If those two characters had been dropped I would have been a happy camper.

Luckily I liked Akane. She’s a damaged character who got several soldiers killed when Godzilla first showed up and hasn’t gotten over the event. It doesn’t help that the brother of one of the soldiers who was killed is part of the Mechagodzilla team and makes her life a living hell.

I also liked that Mechagodzilla still retained the essence of Godzilla and went berserk when it heard the current Godzilla roar. It made Mechagodzilla more than just a giant remote controlled robot. It gave the character some pathos.

All in all, I liked this movie. Annoying characters aside, it was fun and had some great action in it. I was afraid that I wouldn’t be able to get past the fact that these were guys in suits stomping around model cities but after a while I just accepted it and went along for the ride. It helps that I’ve been seeing a steady diet of guys in suits destroying cities watching Power Rangers my whole life.

I next watched Godzilla: Tokyo S.O.S. It’s a direct follow-up to Mechagodzilla even though it gets rid of pretty much the entire cast from the last movie.  I’m not going to complain that the scientist and his daughter are gone from the movie, though. In their place is Yoshito, a technician who works on Mechagodzilla, his grandfather Shinichi who apparently was in the original Mothra film, and Yoshito’s nephew Shun who is nowhere near as annoying as the girl in the last movie. There are also a couple of new Mechagodzilla pilots but they don’t add much to the film, IMO. Also, Mothra makes an appearance. This had me excited because I knew that Mothra was a frequent star in the Godzilla films as well as appearing in her own films.

The film begins a little while after the battle between Mechagodzilla and Godzilla in the last film. Mechagodzilla is being repaired and the pilots are being sent to the U.S. to get more training (because it makes sense to send Mechagodzilla pilots to America where Mechagodzilla isn’t) and new pilots are being brought in. I really don’t get why they felt the need to replace the pilots, especially Akane who had developed a bond with Mechagodzilla. They still could have focused on Yoshito and just had her in the background.

Anyways, Mothra and her fairies come to warn Yoshito and his family that Mechagodzilla must be laid back to rest in the ocean. If they don’t, Mothra will attack Japan. But if they do, Mothra will protect Japan from any future attacks. Shinichi warns the prime minister who feels that they can’t rely on a giant moth. Can’t exactly argue with him there. Of course Godzilla eventually makes himself known and attacks the city. Shun calls on Mothra who comes to their aid and does kinda badly. I like Mothra. I really do. She’s a cool kaiju. But a giant flying moth against Godzilla isn’t much of a contest.

Mechagodzilla goes into battle and aids Mothra. Mothra eventually bites it but Mothra’s egg hatches and two Mothra larvae head to Japan to help their momma. Mechagodzilla gets injured and Yoshito is the only one close enough to go repair the giant robot and get it back in the fight. Eventually, he realizes that Mothra was right and all Mechagodzilla wants to do is head back into the ocean depths, but it is willing to take the new Godzilla with it.

I like this film more than the previous one. The annoying characters are gone and the new characters are more interesting. The fights were also better simply because Mothra and her larvae were battling with Godzilla so it changed things up. I liked the ending as well with Mechagodzilla diving into the depths with Godzilla in its embrace. Taken together, the two Mechagodzilla movies were a lot of fun and I am glad that I chose to watch those two first. I am officially in love with Mechagodzilla now.

Next I watched Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack which I’m going to abbreviate GMK because I am not writing that title out again. I was glad to see that this film had King Ghidorah in it because he’s basically Godzilla’s Luthor or Joker, or so it seems. So I was ready to see these two slug it out.

What I was not ready for was this film. Wowza. I was expecting another campy, silly, fun Godzilla movie like the last two. Instead what I got was a serious take on Godzilla and an excellent movie and probably my favorite out of the bunch.
Godzilla in this movie doesn’t mess around. Even though Godzilla stomped around in the last two films I never got the feeling that he was evil. Here, however, Godzilla was a force of nature and pretty scary. It helped that the film slowly built up to Godzilla and only gave us glimpses for the first thirty or so minutes. The when Godzilla does show up he gets right down to business and lays waste to everything around him. Even his atomic breath is treated as a serious weapon here with tremendous destructive capability. I love the look of this Godzilla too (minus the beer belly). It looks evil.

The characters are a lot better too. Yuri and her father Taizo really carry the movie and do it well. While I liked the characters in the last two films, here I really cared for these two and didn’t want anything bad to happen to them.
It was a little disconcerting to see the Mothra in this film after watching Tokyo: S.O.S. This Mothra is fine with collateral damage and doesn’t come equipped with fairies (though female twins do make a cameo appearance). Plus this Mothra doesn’t have gold dust, but instead fires thousands of stingers. I think the stingers do more damage, honestly. Still, I kind of missed the fairies and the singing and the larvae.

I was surprised to see Baragon show up since he isn’t in the title but that’s okay. I liked this spunky little kaiju that had no chance whatsoever of stopping Godzilla. At least it tried, and gave us a pretty cool fight scene.

I will admit to being a little disappointed with King Ghidorah. I didn’t mind him being one of the good guys, but he did seem under-powered in the movie. He doesn’t even get his wings until Mothra dies and uses her life force on him. I can’t complain too much because that final battle with Godzilla is pretty epic. You will believe that two men in rubber costumes can fight each other.

The change to Godzilla’s origin was surprising. Here he is the vengeance of all the people who died at Japanese hands during the war in the Pacific. It works in the context of the movie and explains why Godzilla is hell-bent on destroying Japan.

Oh, how funny was it that they reference the American Godzilla in this movie? I know it was just to take a dig and say that the Godzilla in that movie wasn’t the real deal, but now you could technically watch the original Godzilla movie, the American Godzilla, and then GMK since they apparently all exist in the same universe. Not thinking ahead were they?
I can’t praise this movie enough. It wasn’t what I expected at all and I loved every minute of it. This is the movie I would show people who think the Godzilla films are cheesy and just for kids. In fact, I will probably force my friends to watch this one since they think Godzilla films are pretty stupid.

So, I go from a great film in GMK to Godzilla Vs. Megaguirus. Suffice it to say, it’s a downward transition. Honestly, the movie starts out pretty well. I loved the opening scene of Godzilla in black and white attacking Tokyo. The film’s alternate history is pretty interesting, what with periodic Godzilla attacks forcing Japan to move their capital and getting rid of nuclear energy. Then the bazooka attack on Godzilla was a terrific sequence. Kiriko is a good protagonist though she reminded me of Akane. I like the G-Graspers and their organization. The Dimension Tide is a cool weapon and a nifty way to get rid of Godzilla. There are no really annoying characters to be found.

And yet, most of the movie is a bore. I like the idea of a legion of deadly mutated bugs attacking and one of them being a giant deadly mutated bug that attacks Godzilla to steal his nuclear energy. Yet the smaller bugs don’t really do anything. Even when the military attack them they just fly off. And seeing Godzilla being attacked by a swarm of really fake looking CGI bugs and a few puppets does not an interesting scene make. I was hoping that the showdown between Godzilla and Megaguirus would spice things up but honestly it wasn’t great. It had its moments, like when Megaguirus dropped that pyramid thing on Godzilla’s head.

Maybe I’m being too harsh on it simply because I watched GMK before and was comparing the two. Or maybe this was just kind of a dull movie. I don’t know. But this is probably my least favorite of the Millennium films.

Oh, and does every Godzilla film have to have one character go on a suicidal mission to stop Godzilla? Does Toho make that a requirement for every script? Inquiring minds want to know.

So last is Godzilla: Final Wars. This is the one I was most excited about because of the sheer number of monsters appearing. So far I had only seen Mechagodzilla, Mothra and her kids, Baragon, and King Ghidorah. I was ready to see a ton more monsters, and the movie delivers in that regard. I had an absolute blast with this film and its sheer insanity. Sure, it rips off a ton of movies and the monster battles are rushed but that didn’t really bother me.
I like the universe this film set up. Nations create the Earth Defense Force to combat giant monsters and give it a lot of cool tech like flying ships. There are also mutants now who have superhuman strength and work for the E.D.F. I just like the concept of everything. I wish all of this had been set up in a previous film so we could have spent more time with these characters.

When the monsters appear en masse and just start destroying everything in sight I was in awe. It was wonderful. And who would have guessed that the American Godzilla(referred to as Zilla)would make an appearance? These scenes were great. Finally giant monsters attack the rest of the globe and not just Japan. I loved seeing Ozaki, Kazama, and the rest of the mutants take on Ebirah and almost kill it before the Xiliens arrive. I wish that that sequence would have gone on longer.

I didn’t even mind that Godzilla had so far only appeared in a few minutes of the film. I loved everything else the movie was throwing my way. I won’t lie though. I was ready for the King of All Monsters to get pulled out of the ice and start laying waste to everything around him. And when he does it is glorious. Yes, most fights aren’t long at all but that’s okay. The few fights that do last longer are worth it. Godzilla versus Anguirus, King Caesar, and Rodan was terrific. Oh, and I laughed when Godzilla defeated Zilla in about ten seconds. While I certainly understand that Zilla is no match for Godzilla I was hoping for a longer fight between the two of them. But I’m sure most fans cheered when Zilla was dispatched so easily.

Really though, the main fight was what made the movie. Godzilla vs. Monster X(who becomes King Ghidorah), as well as Gigan and Mothra thrown into the mix? Oh hell yes. Gigan was a great looking monster and I was sad that he seemed to meet an untimely death so when he reappeared for the final battle I was happy. I was even happier when Monster X became a giant Ghidorah that kicked Godzilla’s butt all over the place. This is the King Ghidorah I had expected to see in GMK. A towering beast that was pure evil.

The human drama was just as interesting to me. Ozaki may be a Japanese Neo, but I’m fine with that. He was a good protagonist. While the actor playing Captain Gordon shouldn’t give up his day job, I couldn’t help but like the big guy. I’ll also ignore the fact that he was speaking English while everyone else was speaking Japanese and everyone seemed fine with that. It was also strange that Kazama would speak English with what to me sounded like an American accent every now and then as well. Oh, and he keeps the tradition of a suicidal attempt alive. I will give them points in that this case he was trying to stop the Xiliens and not Godzilla.

The Xiliens were definitely out there villains. They looked like a cheap Matrix knock-off and the Xilien Kaizer was a brat but I liked them. They fit the movie perfectly.

While I have no clue exactly where Baby Godzilla came from and why it doesn’t share daddy’s rage issues, I didn’t mind it showing up at the end to convince Godzilla to give peace a chance. I had been wondering why the movie kept showing us Baby Godzilla riding around with the kid and his grandfather so I was just glad to see that it did indeed have to do something with the overall plot. Maybe it’s a schmaltzy ending, but I think it works. Godzilla did basically save what was left of humanity and since this was the big celebration of his 50th anniversary they couldn’t kill him off. So Godzilla letting go of his anger and riding off into the sunset with his kid was a good send-off.

I will say that I do wish that each movie hadn’t been a stand-alone film. If they had built to Final Wars it would have made everything that much grander and maybe Final Wars wouldn’t have been so rushed. But I can’t argue that the reboot allowed them to vary things up with each film and allowed them to try different things. I wouldn’t trade GMK for anything and it would be hard to do other films after having Godzilla be so completely evil.

So now, aside from Godzilla 2000, I’m done with the Millennium films. All in all, I enjoyed them a lot. They definitely made me a Godzilla fan. GMK is the best of the lot, IMO. My favorite anyway. I think Final Wars takes the next spot, followed by Tokyo S.O.S. and then Against Mechagodzilla and ending with Vs. Megaguirus. But I had fun watching all of them and will probably re-watch them a lot.

Next I think I’ll tackle the Heisei era Godzilla films. Or try to anyways. I’m not sure if they are all even on DVD. I know Godzilla Vs. Biollante is as well as Godzilla Vs. Mechagodzilla 2 since I saw them at the store when I was buying the others. Hopefully they all are since from what I’ve read it seems like those films have a loose continuity between them.
I’ve also discovered that the director of GMK, Shusuke Kaneko, directed three Gamera films in the 90s that are apparently considered some of the best kaiju films around. So I went ahead and ordered the Blu-Ray trilogy and that should arrive any day now hopefully. Consider me a kaiju fan now.
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#2 DWF

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 04:40 AM

You saw them pretty much out of order and I've never quite understood the complaint about the scientist going after Akane makign him twice her age makes her too young to be a veteran pilot. GMK is of course the best of the bunch and I do recommend seeing the Gamera trilogy. And I do think Godzilla Final Wars is a fun movie and that's really all it's make out to be.
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#3 Christopher

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 08:00 AM

My reviews of the Millennium series on my blog:


Millennium Part 1
Millennium Part 2


View PostVirgil Vox, on 21 April 2013 - 11:07 PM, said:

I will admit that I haven’t watched Godzilla 2000 yet. The only reason being is that the Japanese language track isn’t on there so I can either have English or French dubbed and I hate dubbed movies. I’d rather hear the original language and read sub-titles. I will probably buy this movie and suck it up because I want to own all of the Millennium films and who knows? Maybe the dubbing won’t be that bad. And I’m pretty sure I’ll get used to it as the movie plays.


You're not missing much. As the start of a new era of G-films, it's underwhelming -- not different enough from the previous series to feel fresh. It's also perhaps the only one of the seven distinct Toho Godzilla continuities that doesn't have any clear connection to the 1954 original.



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Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla was the first movie I watched. Overall, I liked it.


I found the Kiryu films to be among the weakest of the Millennium Era. I liked the actress playing Akane, though. It's a shame they didn't keep her around longer.



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Then another Godzilla shows up and stomps around Japan, forcing the Japanese government to take drastic measures. Those measures being using the bones of the original Godzilla to create Mechagodzilla.


Which is a retcon, since the original film showed Godzilla being completely disintegrated. Also, the cheap CGI they used to recreate the scene looked worse and sillier than the original 1954 rubber-suit effects.


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I next watched Godzilla: Tokyo S.O.S. It’s a direct follow-up to Mechagodzilla even though it gets rid of pretty much the entire cast from the last movie.  I’m not going to complain that the scientist and his daughter are gone from the movie, though. In their place is Yoshito, a technician who works on Mechagodzilla, his grandfather Shinichi who apparently was in the original Mothra film, and Yoshito’s nephew Shun who is nowhere near as annoying as the girl in the last movie. There are also a couple of new Mechagodzilla pilots but they don’t add much to the film, IMO. Also, Mothra makes an appearance. This had me excited because I knew that Mothra was a frequent star in the Godzilla films as well as appearing in her own films.

This one's a pseudo-remake of Mothra vs. Godzilla, which as it happens I just watched last night (because I found the Japanese version at the library, whereas Netflix only had the dub that stupidly referred to Mothra as "the Thing"). The interesting thing about the Kiryu continuity is that, while most post-1975 continuities disregard all the pre-'75 movies except the '54 original, the Kiryu films also count some of the non-Godzilla films from that era, primarily Mothra (but not Mothra vs. Godzilla, which creates a continuity error when Shinichi Chujo recognizes the "final attack" which Mothra only used in MvG).

Incidentally, the actor who was Chujo in Mothra and Tokyo SOS also played the scientist-hero Miura in MvG. And he was also in the first King Ghidorah film as a character who's variously referred to as Miura or Murai, so I'm unsure whether it's the same character.


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But a giant flying moth against Godzilla isn’t much of a contest.

It's weird that Mothra's newborn larvae are always more potent against Godzilla than the adult kaiju herself.


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What I was not ready for was this film. Wowza. I was expecting another campy, silly, fun Godzilla movie like the last two. Instead what I got was a serious take on Godzilla and an excellent movie and probably my favorite out of the bunch.

Yeah... GMK has its flaws, but it's certainly the high point of the Millennium Era, and the most serious film in the series since the '54 original, both in its storytelling and its anti-war message. (It's a striking contrast to the previous King Ghidorah film in the '90s, a jingoistic movie that glorified Japan's WWII history and painted Godzilla as essentially their ally and a divine protector of Japan -- which was doubly weird since it was in the middle of a continuity that normally treated him as the villain.)

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I love the look of this Godzilla too (minus the beer belly). It looks evil.

Really? Wow. I think it's the worst, fakest-looking Godzilla suit in the Millennium series

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The characters are a lot better too. Yuri and her father Taizo really carry the movie and do it well.

Yeah, they're terrific. Two of the best actors and characters in G-film history.


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Oh, how funny was it that they reference the American Godzilla in this movie? I know it was just to take a dig and say that the Godzilla in that movie wasn’t the real deal, but now you could technically watch the original Godzilla movie, the American Godzilla, and then GMK since they apparently all exist in the same universe. Not thinking ahead were they?

Not sure what you mean about thinking ahead, but I do agree that GMK's reference to the New York "Godzilla" allows that film to be neatly fit into the GMK continuity. On the one hand, you had a reptilian kaiju showing up in New York and identified by Japanese observers as "Gojira," implying that they had encountered a kaiju of that name at some time in the past. GMK shows a world where Gojira/Godzilla attacked in 1954 and then was gone for half a century, with records of the original attack being censored and suppressed to avoid making the Self Defence Forces look bad, so people had forgotten a lot about Godzilla, including what he looked like. Remember that in GMK, Baragon was also misidentified as Godzilla by a number of observers.


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I can’t praise this movie enough. It wasn’t what I expected at all and I loved every minute of it. This is the movie I would show people who think the Godzilla films are cheesy and just for kids. In fact, I will probably force my friends to watch this one since they think Godzilla films are pretty stupid.

Well, the '54 original is the best example of a serious, adult Godzilla film. Especially if you remind viewers that it was made less than a decade after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, so the scenes of devastation it depicted were no mere fantasy to the filmmakers and their original audience. Which makes it an interesting contrast to GMK, whose director intended it as an allegory about a Japan that was too ready to forget the darkness in its past -- and perhaps a deconstruction of a Godzilla franchise that had lost its connection to its allegorical roots.


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So, I go from a great film in GMK to Godzilla Vs. Megaguirus. Suffice it to say, it’s a downward transition. Honestly, the movie starts out pretty well. I loved the opening scene of Godzilla in black and white attacking Tokyo. The film’s alternate history is pretty interesting, what with periodic Godzilla attacks forcing Japan to move their capital and getting rid of nuclear energy. Then the bazooka attack on Godzilla was a terrific sequence. Kiriko is a good protagonist though she reminded me of Akane.

Having seen the films in order, I find Akane a pale imitation of Kiriko (though definitely hotter). Kiriko used Godzilla as a surfboard. You can't top that level of awesome.


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I like the G-Graspers and their organization. The Dimension Tide is a cool weapon and a nifty way to get rid of Godzilla.

The name "G-Graspers" is an abuse of a translation dictionary, but "Dimension Tide" is such a beautiful, poetic name that it makes up for it.


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Maybe I’m being too harsh on it simply because I watched GMK before and was comparing the two. Or maybe this was just kind of a dull movie. I don’t know. But this is probably my least favorite of the Millennium films.

I'd rate it second-best after GMK. None of the other Millennium films really impressed me.


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So last is Godzilla: Final Wars. This is the one I was most excited about because of the sheer number of monsters appearing. So far I had only seen Mechagodzilla, Mothra and her kids, Baragon, and King Ghidorah. I was ready to see a ton more monsters, and the movie delivers in that regard. I had an absolute blast with this film and its sheer insanity. Sure, it rips off a ton of movies and the monster battles are rushed but that didn’t really bother me.

I hated Final Wars. It's not really a Godzilla film, it's the Power Rangers in the Matrix on Independence Day, guest-starring Godzilla. There are parts of it that are kind of fun, like the ultra-badass American captain who sounds like Scruffy from Futurama, but mostly it's a mess.


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And who would have guessed that the American Godzilla(referred to as Zilla)would make an appearance?

And be taken down in like ten seconds, an obvious dig at the lameness of that film. Although there's no way this film can be in continuity with the '98 US film, since it's in a universe where kaiju attacks have been routine for decades. The film's continuity is basically a variant of the original Showa continuity, one in which the alien invasions and Godzilla's reform into a heroic figure never happened -- meaning its timeline would diverge between Mothra vs. Godzilla and Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster. And of course the film is kind of a loose remake of the second Ghidorah film, Invasion of the Astro-Beast, with the Xilians ("X-aliens") being an updated version of the Xians ("X-ians") from Planet X in that movie. Although it's mainly a remake of Destroy All Monsters, which also had alien-controlled kaiju attacking cities all over the world.


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While I have no clue exactly where Baby Godzilla came from and why it doesn’t share daddy’s rage issues, I didn’t mind it showing up at the end to convince Godzilla to give peace a chance. I had been wondering why the movie kept showing us Baby Godzilla riding around with the kid and his grandfather so I was just glad to see that it did indeed have to do something with the overall plot. Maybe it’s a schmaltzy ending, but I think it works.

Whereas I considered that whole subplot, and the ending it led to, the stupidest part of the whole stupid mess.


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Next I think I’ll tackle the Heisei era Godzilla films. Or try to anyways. I’m not sure if they are all even on DVD. I know Godzilla Vs. Biollante is as well as Godzilla Vs. Mechagodzilla 2 since I saw them at the store when I was buying the others. Hopefully they all are since from what I’ve read it seems like those films have a loose continuity between them.

With the recent release of Biollante, all but the first Heisei-era film The Return of Godzilla are now on DVD. So basically that's all six films featuring Miki Saegusa, the most frequently recurring human character in the whole franchise. I've seen all of the last five, but haven't yet gotten my hands on Biollante. The Heisei films actually have a comparatively strong continuity, at least stronger than the other eras have had, though there are a few inconsistencies.

Oh, and watch the penultimate Heisei film, Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla, at your own risk. It's a horrible, horrible movie, and it can be easily skipped without losing anything important to the continuity.
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#4 Virgil Vox

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 10:20 AM

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You saw them pretty much out of order and I've never quite understood the complaint about the scientist going after Akane makign him twice her age makes her too young to be a veteran pilot.

Well, I wasn't sure I would like the films so I bought Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla first. I liked that one, so I bought the rest and watched Tokyo S.O.S. next since it was a direct follow-up. I was excited to see Mothra and Ghidorah which is why I watched GMK next. I had to order Final Wars from Amazon because I couldn't find it in town which is why I next watched Godzilla Vs. Megaguiris and then Final Wars.

My complaint isn't that she's too young to be a veteran pilot. She looks like she's in her late twenties. And it's really not so much an age thing as the guy just comes off kinda creepy and desperate when he's talking to her and trying to get a date.

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GMK is of course the best of the bunch and I do recommend seeing the Gamera trilogy. And I do think Godzilla Final Wars is a fun movie and that's really all it's make out to be.

I am excited to see the Gamera trilogy. I've read up on it and it does sound really good. Hopefully the movies will arrive soon. Final Wars was a lot of fun and honestly that's all it needed to be. I wanted to see a ton of monster mayhem and I did.

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My reviews of the Millennium series on my blog:


Millennium Part 1
Millennium Part 2

Haven't had a chance to read them yet but I will soon. Thanks for the links.

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You're not missing much. As the start of a new era of G-films, it's underwhelming -- not different enough from the previous series to feel fresh. It's also perhaps the only one of the seven distinct Toho Godzilla continuities that doesn't have any clear connection to the 1954 original.

Sad. I would have thought they would have gone all out on the first film to get audiences excited for Godzilla again.

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It's weird that Mothra's newborn larvae are always more potent against Godzilla than the adult kaiju herself.

Yeah, Mothra really needs to keep that cocooning abilty when she grows to adulthood since that seems like the best thing to stop Godzilla.

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Yeah... GMK has its flaws, but it's certainly the high point of the Millennium Era, and the most serious film in the series since the '54 original, both in its storytelling and its anti-war message. (It's a striking contrast to the previous King Ghidorah film in the '90s, a jingoistic movie that glorified Japan's WWII history and painted Godzilla as essentially their ally and a divine protector of Japan -- which was doubly weird since it was in the middle of a continuity that normally treated him as the villain.)

Is that the movie where Japanese and American soldiers are fighting on an island and a Godzilla dinosaur decides to attack the American troops to save the Japanese?

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Really? Wow. I think it's the worst, fakest-looking Godzilla suit in the Millennium series

I'll admit that when Godzilla first showed up in GMK I didn't like the suit either. I liked the one from the Kiryu movies better. And I still do. But the GMK suit grew on me (aside from the beer belly) and to me it did radiate evil.



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Not sure what you mean about thinking ahead, but I do agree that GMK's reference to the New York "Godzilla" allows that film to be neatly fit into the GMK continuity.

What I meant was that the mention that it wasn't Godzilla, and the inclusion of Zilla in Final Wars seemed to be the filmmaker's way of discrediting the American Godzilla and making fun of it. Yet by referencing it in GMK and including Zilla they've given it legitimacy and made it part of GMK's continuity.

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Well, the '54 original is the best example of a serious, adult Godzilla film. Especially if you remind viewers that it was made less than a decade after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, so the scenes of devastation it depicted were no mere fantasy to the filmmakers and their original audience.

I have a hard enough time convincing my friends to watch foreign movies, let alone foreign movies that are black and white and were made in 1954. It's sad, but true.

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Having seen the films in order, I find Akane a pale imitation of Kiriko (though definitely hotter). Kiriko used Godzilla as a surfboard. You can't top that level of awesome.

True. If I had watched them in the correct order Akane would be the imitator, not Kiriko. I do agree that Kiriko riding Godzilla was a great moment in the film. I was not expecting that. She was brave, I'll give her that.

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I'd rate it second-best after GMK. None of the other Millennium films really impressed me.

I might have to give it a second look then. I was afraid I was judging it too harshly.

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With the recent release of Biollante, all but the first Heisei-era film The Return of Godzilla are now on DVD. So basically that's all six films featuring Miki Saegusa, the most frequently recurring human character in the whole franchise. I've seen all of the last five, but haven't yet gotten my hands on Biollante. The Heisei films actually have a comparatively strong continuity, at least stronger than the other eras have had, though there are a few inconsistencies.

Thanks. Good to know. I know that Biolannte and Mechagodzilla 2 are here in town. I haven't run across the others so I'll probably have to order them on-line. I did however notice that aside from those two, the rest are dubbed which feels me with dread.

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Oh, and watch the penultimate Heisei film, Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla, at your own risk. It's a horrible, horrible movie, and it can be easily skipped without losing anything important to the continuity.

I'll take that under advisement, but probably end up watching it just so I can review all of the films.
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#5 Christopher

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 11:13 AM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 22 April 2013 - 10:20 AM, said:

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You're not missing much. As the start of a new era of G-films, it's underwhelming -- not different enough from the previous series to feel fresh. It's also perhaps the only one of the seven distinct Toho Godzilla continuities that doesn't have any clear connection to the 1954 original.

Sad. I would have thought they would have gone all out on the first film to get audiences excited for Godzilla again.

Well, maybe that has something to do with how the new series came about. Toho had expected TriStar to do a trilogy of American Godzilla films, so they were planning to hold off on bringing back the big G until the 50th anniversary in 2004. But when the '98 film flopped, they apparently hastened to get a new series underway in time for the 45th anniversary in '99. And they brought back many of the same people responsible for the later Heisei films, so despite the goal of rebooting the continuity, it felt more like a Heisei rehash with a few details changed.


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(It's a striking contrast to the previous King Ghidorah film in the '90s, a jingoistic movie that glorified Japan's WWII history and painted Godzilla as essentially their ally and a divine protector of Japan -- which was doubly weird since it was in the middle of a continuity that normally treated him as the villain.)

Is that the movie where Japanese and American soldiers are fighting on an island and a Godzilla dinosaur decides to attack the American troops to save the Japanese?

Exactly. That film also has some of the worst time-travel logic in cinema history. They go back in time to prevent Godzilla's creation, and when they return to the future, Godzilla is (seemingly) gone -- but everyone still remembers that he was there just before!


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What I meant was that the mention that it wasn't Godzilla, and the inclusion of Zilla in Final Wars seemed to be the filmmaker's way of discrediting the American Godzilla and making fun of it. Yet by referencing it in GMK and including Zilla they've given it legitimacy and made it part of GMK's continuity.

Well, what both films do is establish that the American Godzilla is a separate kaiju who was named that by mistake. I'm fine with that. I've long thought that the '98 film is a perfectly decent monster movie as long as you accept that it's not a Godzilla movie.


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Thanks. Good to know. I know that Biolannte and Mechagodzilla 2 are here in town. I haven't run across the others so I'll probably have to order them on-line. I did however notice that aside from those two, the rest are dubbed which feels me with dread.

Yeah, I had to settle for dubs of some of them. Anyway, Mechagodzilla 2 is my favorite Heisei film. It has some interesting, thoughtful comments about technology and nature, and some engaging characters. And I really love Akira Ifukube's Mechagodzilla theme here. (I gather it's a reworking of his King Kong vs. Godzilla theme, but I've only been able to find the dreadful English version of that film, which replaces all the music.)


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Oh, and watch the penultimate Heisei film, Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla, at your own risk. It's a horrible, horrible movie, and it can be easily skipped without losing anything important to the continuity.

I'll take that under advisement, but probably end up watching it just so I can review all of the films.

Your choice, but don't say I didn't warn you.
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#6 G-man

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 11:16 AM

For myself, I found that GMK's unconventional interpretation of Godzilla & co. kind of places it outside of any post original film continuity.  That said, I also felt that it came closest to recapturing the spirit of the original film.  Godzilla, here, is the King of the Monsters, and their ain't no trumped up Guardian Beast that's really able to stand toe to toe with it.

What was a nice touch was the whole intelligence lag thing and watching command try to figure out just what it was they were facing; and then showing that the military needs time to muster and deploy their forces.  It added another touch of verasimilitude to the film.

Albeit, I do wish they had allowed the director to proceed with Varan and Anguirus as the other two opponents as opposed to substituting Mothra and Ghidorah.

As for the suit, it looked mean with those all-white eyes and its snarl, and given how it was shot it also felt massive.

/s/

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#7 Christopher

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 12:30 PM

View PostG-man, on 22 April 2013 - 11:16 AM, said:

For myself, I found that GMK's unconventional interpretation of Godzilla & co. kind of places it outside of any post original film continuity.

Well, yeah, that's the idea. The six Millennium films represent five separate continuities. The two Kiryu films and Final Wars tie into some of the Showa-era films (but not others), but the first three Millennium films have no continuity ties to anything except the '54 original (and Godzilla 2000 doesn't even explicitly tie into that one).


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That said, I also felt that it came closest to recapturing the spirit of the original film.  Godzilla, here, is the King of the Monsters, and their ain't no trumped up Guardian Beast that's really able to stand toe to toe with it.

Well, the spirit of the original was that Godzilla was an allegory for the horrors of war, including the horrors that Japan's aggression had brought down on itself. So I agree in that sense. That whole "King of the Monsters" thing was added for the American version. In the original film, Godzilla was more a problem for the main characters to solve than a main character per se. I mean, he literally slept through most of the climax.
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#8 Virgil Vox

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 07:54 PM

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Well, what both films do is establish that the American Godzilla is a separate kaiju who was named that by mistake. I'm fine with that. I've long thought that the '98 film is a perfectly decent monster movie as long as you accept that it's not a Godzilla movie.

I've always liked the American Godzilla film as well. Maybe it's not a good Godzilla film, but it is a good giant monster runs amok film. So I like that it was referenced. It just seemed like the Japanese were trying to discredit it while at the same time legitimizing it.

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What was a nice touch was the whole intelligence lag thing and watching command try to figure out just what it was they were facing; and then showing that the military needs time to muster and deploy their forces.  It added another touch of verasimilitude to the film.

I liked that as well and meant to comment on it. In the other movies the military usually had a good idea what was going on and were prepared for the attacks. Here they couldn't even agree on whether the monster was Godzilla or not.

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Albeit, I do wish they had allowed the director to proceed with Varan and Anguirus as the other two opponents as opposed to substituting Mothra and Ghidorah.

That would have been interesting. They would have fit better with Baragon, and it would mean that they didn't have to de-power Mothra and Ghidorah. From what I've read though is that Toho wanted to use big name monsters since the Megaguirus film didn't do all that well.

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As for the suit, it looked mean with those all-white eyes and its snarl, and given how it was shot it also felt massive.

Agreed. I was loving the suit by the end of the film. It may not be my favorite Godzilla suit but it fit the tone of the movie perfectly.

So I was looking up The Return of Godzilla(or Godzilla 1985 as it's known in the States) and the artwork looked familiar. So I went digging through our old VHS collection and I found it, along with Godzilla Vs. King Ghidorah, Godzilla Vs. Mechagodzilla, and two older Godzilla movies. I then went ahead  and bought Vs. Biollante and Vs. Mechagodzilla II. I'll probably get the other films from Amazon here in the next few days since I couldn't find them in the stores around here. But I've now realized that I've never watched the original Godzilla. It was Godzilla 1985 that I watched. I guess my younger self got the two confused and eventually I just thought I had watched the original. Makes me sad.
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#9 Christopher

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 10:11 PM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 23 April 2013 - 07:54 PM, said:

I've always liked the American Godzilla film as well. Maybe it's not a good Godzilla film, but it is a good giant monster runs amok film. So I like that it was referenced. It just seemed like the Japanese were trying to discredit it while at the same time legitimizing it.

I think they were just making an in-joke to say "Hey, that wasn't really Godzilla," but by doing so, they happened to offer an easy way to reconcile it. It's certainly a more elegant response than Final Wars's cursory trashing of "Zilla."


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So I was looking up The Return of Godzilla(or Godzilla 1985 as it's known in the States) and the artwork looked familiar. So I went digging through our old VHS collection and I found it, along with Godzilla Vs. King Ghidorah, Godzilla Vs. Mechagodzilla, and two older Godzilla movies. I then went ahead  and bought Vs. Biollante and Vs. Mechagodzilla II. I'll probably get the other films from Amazon here in the next few days since I couldn't find them in the stores around here. But I've now realized that I've never watched the original Godzilla. It was Godzilla 1985 that I watched. I guess my younger self got the two confused and eventually I just thought I had watched the original. Makes me sad.

Watch the original -- the Japanese version, no Raymond Burr -- as soon as you can. It's an extraordinarily powerful film.

Godzilla 1985 has some differences from The Return of Godzilla. They brought back Raymond Burr to shoot some new scenes as his character from the 1956 Godzilla: King of the Monsters. This review spells out some of the other changes, like scenes being deleted and some of the dubbed dialogue being inappropriately comical or rewritten to suit American political sensibilites of the time.

On my blog overview, I offered a master list of all the different Godzilla film continuities, and I counted the two Raymond Burr versions as their own distinct continuity.
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#10 Virgil Vox

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 01:08 AM

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Watch the original -- the Japanese version, no Raymond Burr -- as soon as you can. It's an extraordinarily powerful film.

I plan to. Just kicking myself that I confused the original and 1985 versions.

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Godzilla 1985 has some differences from The Return of Godzilla. They brought back Raymond Burr to shoot some new scenes as his character from the 1956 Godzilla: King of the Monsters. This review spells out some of the other changes, like scenes being deleted and some of the dubbed dialogue being inappropriately comical or rewritten to suit American political sensibilites of the time.

I could tell that there had been some changes made. I knew that all the scenes with Raymond Burr was new American footage. I'll probably do a review today or tomorrow of 1985 and Biollante.
"You will give the people an ideal to strive towards. They will race behind you. They will stumble. They will fall. But in time, they will join you in the sun. In time, you will help them accomplish wonders."
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#11 G-man

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 08:58 AM

View PostChristopher, on 22 April 2013 - 12:30 PM, said:

View PostG-man, on 22 April 2013 - 11:16 AM, said:

For myself, I found that GMK's unconventional interpretation of Godzilla & co. kind of places it outside of any post original film continuity.

Well, yeah, that's the idea. The six Millennium films represent five separate continuities. The two Kiryu films and Final Wars tie into some of the Showa-era films (but not others), but the first three Millennium films have no continuity ties to anything except the '54 original (and Godzilla 2000 doesn't even explicitly tie into that one).

Not quite what I meant.  What I meant was that most of the other Godzilla films were coached as SF.  Very little mysticism/spiritualism was included in their make-up, this despite the likes of Mothra, Megalon or King Ceasar; and even in the Heisei and the other Millenium films, this "tone" was adhered to.

Whereas in GMK, we had Guardian Monsters of myth, vengeful spirits, wandering ghosts, and visions.  Even though it was set in contemporary times, with people being realistically depicted, the whole underlying mindset was different.

Not that there was anything wrong with it, I was simply noting this difference.

/s/

Gloriosus
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Let me strive every moment of my life to make myself better and better, to the best of my ability, so that all may profit by it.
Let me think of the right and lend my assistance to all who may need it, with no regard for anything but justice.
Let me take what comes with a smile, without loss of courage.
Let me be considerate of my country, of my fellow citizens, and my associates in everything I say and do.
Let me do right to all, and wrong no man.
-- Doc Savage

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#12 Christopher

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 09:28 AM

View PostG-man, on 24 April 2013 - 08:58 AM, said:

Not quite what I meant.  What I meant was that most of the other Godzilla films were coached as SF.  Very little mysticism/spiritualism was included in their make-up, this despite the likes of Mothra, Megalon or King Ceasar; and even in the Heisei and the other Millenium films, this "tone" was adhered to.

Whereas in GMK, we had Guardian Monsters of myth, vengeful spirits, wandering ghosts, and visions.  Even though it was set in contemporary times, with people being realistically depicted, the whole underlying mindset was different.

Not that there was anything wrong with it, I was simply noting this difference.

It's not as great a difference as it seems to Westerners. We come from a cultural tradition that defines divinity as something separate from and above the material world, and that leads us to see stories based on the supernatural and stories based on science and technology as two very distinct things. But Japan's spiritual tradition is animist -- a belief that the spiritual pervades the physical, that divine forces are part of every mundane thing, including animals and technology. Supernatural entities in Japanese lore are often portrayed as physical animals, such as dragons or Totoro, say. (And I'd love to see Godzilla vs. Totoro.) And conversely, technology is often shown to have a spiritual or magical component -- see the various Super Sentai (Power Rangers) seasons where the giant robots are animated by the spirits of extinct creatures or are living ancient guardians of the land or what-have-you, or the Digimon franchise that portrays the Internet as a supernatural realm and AIs and game constructs as ensouled beings. So there's not as sharp a dichotomy between SF and fantasy as you see in the West. A lot of Japanese fantastic fiction is both at once.

Godzilla's creator, Tomoyuki Tanaka, has referred to him as "the Sacred Beast of the Apocalypse." Despite being explained as a dinosaur or a radioactive mutant, there's always been a sense that Godzilla was an animistic embodiment of nuclear holocaust -- or, in some later movies, a spiritual protector of Japan itself, much like the Yamato Monsters in GMK. It's usually kept subtle, enough that Western audiences are prone to miss it altogether, but the undercurrent is there. In the original, Godzilla had long been worshipped by the Oto Islanders as their god, just as the Infant Islanders worshipped Mothra, and just as King Kong was worshipped as a god by the islanders in King Kong vs. Godzilla. In the Kiryu films, when Kiryu/Mechagodzilla is built from the original Godzilla's bones, it's possessed by Godzilla's soul, essentially, and has a spiritual link to the second Godzilla. And conversely, while GMK does play up the spiritual aspect more than most, it nonetheless still characterizes Godzilla as a dinosaur. There's a difference in emphasis, but not in the fundamental underlying assumptions.

Edited by Christopher, 24 April 2013 - 09:31 AM.

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#13 DWF

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:42 PM

It is a bit inaccurate to call Godzilla a dinosaur, a modern day nuclear powered dragon would be more accurate. The 1998 movie is a mess it's full of illogic and plot holes. Space Godizilla is a horrible movie too for that matter, but it does have the longest fight scene I think ever put into a Godzilla movie.

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#14 Virgil Vox

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 09:58 AM

^Okay, now I want to see SpaceGodzilla just because of that picture. I mean, who thinks of these things? "We need a new villain for the next Godzilla movie. How about we throw some giant crystal shoulder pads onto a Godzilla suit, add a little crown thingie, and make him a Godzilla...from space!" It's just so ridiculous.

Okay, so I watched Godzilla 2000. The dubbing wasn't horrible, thankfully. I still prefer subtitles but I can deal. Overall the movie was a let-down. I liked the idea of Godzilla chasers ala storm chasers, and Godzilla himself looked good but otherwise it was kind of a bland movie.

It started well enough. Godzilla shows up and goes on a rampage. Always nice. I thought the scene where the Godzilla chasers realized that Godzilla was standing right in front of them was a good, tense moment.

I also liked that they debated whether Godzilla was a force of nature that should be studied and prepared for, or whether he was a menace that needed to be killed. Neither side of really wrong. I just wish the movie had given a clearer picture of just how many times Godzilla had made landfall in Japan. It has to be enough that an entire organization of Godzilla chasers is up and running but at the same time they also seem woefully ignorant of Godzilla's abilities.

The monster, Orga, wasn't all that impressive either. He isn't even named in the movie. I had to look his name up. The fight between Godzilla and Orga was a let-down as well. I'm all for Toho creating new monsters. They can't just keep using the most popular ones. Maybe next time put a little more effort into it.

The characters were bland as well. God save me from annoying little girls in Godzilla movies. I had my fingers crossed the entire time that she would get stomped by Godzilla. If that makes me a bad person, so be it. :) Katagiri was a cool character, at least up until his basically a suicide moment at the end that came from nowhere. He spends the entire movie trying to kill Godzilla and then decides he'd rather have Godzilla kill him. Um, okay.

What were they thinking with that last bit of dialogue? So Godzilla keeps saving humanity because Godzilla is in everyone? Um, how about no. Godzilla fought Orga because Orga attacked him. I think it's also safe to assumed that the original Godzilla movie exists in this film's continuity so Godzilla destroyed Tokyo many years ago. And he's destroying pretty much the entire city while these idiots stand there saying that Godzilla defends them. I repeat, the city is burning down to a crisp thanks to Godzlla and the main characters are making Godzilla out to be a hero.

So now that I'm done with the Millenium films it's on to the Heisei era.
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#15 Christopher

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 12:03 PM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 25 April 2013 - 09:58 AM, said:

^Okay, now I want to see SpaceGodzilla just because of that picture. I mean, who thinks of these things? "We need a new villain for the next Godzilla movie. How about we throw some giant crystal shoulder pads onto a Godzilla suit, add a little crown thingie, and make him a Godzilla...from space!" It's just so ridiculous.

On my blog, I described SpaceGodzilla as "the love child of Godzilla and the Fortress of Solitude from the Superman movies."


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Okay, so I watched Godzilla 2000. The dubbing wasn't horrible, thankfully. I still prefer subtitles but I can deal. Overall the movie was a let-down. I liked the idea of Godzilla chasers ala storm chasers, and Godzilla himself looked good but otherwise it was kind of a bland movie.

Yeah, the "storm-chasers" approach to Godzilla was the one really interesting idea here.


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I also liked that they debated whether Godzilla was a force of nature that should be studied and prepared for, or whether he was a menace that needed to be killed. Neither side of really wrong.

It was a less successful attempt to revisit a debate that was part of the original '54 film, a movie that had all sorts of ethical conundrums being discussed.


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I just wish the movie had given a clearer picture of just how many times Godzilla had made landfall in Japan. It has to be enough that an entire organization of Godzilla chasers is up and running but at the same time they also seem woefully ignorant of Godzilla's abilities.

Quite so. This is the most ill-defined of all the Toho Godzilla continuities. It isn't even clear whether the original '54 film even happened in this universe, which is exceptional, since usually all Godzilla continuities make a point of being direct sequels to the original (although they reinterpret its events and their nature and meaning in various incompatible ways).


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The monster, Orga, wasn't all that impressive either. He isn't even named in the movie. I had to look his name up.

Orga is called that because he was created from Godzilla's regenerative cells, which in the original film were called Organizer G-1 cells. The dub changed it to Regenerator G-1, which I believe is why the monster isn't named in the English dub.

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The characters were bland as well. God save me from annoying little girls in Godzilla movies. I had my fingers crossed the entire time that she would get stomped by Godzilla.

I kind of liked the girl here. I thought it was fun that she was the one with more of a head for business than the scientist-hero.


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What were they thinking with that last bit of dialogue? So Godzilla keeps saving humanity because Godzilla is in everyone? Um, how about no.

That was changed for the dub. I don't remember what the original line was, and I'm suddenly getting a not-found message and malware warning for the detailed review site I have bookmarked, but it wasn't such a complete non sequitur. It was more fatalistic -- not some kind of "Shucks, there's a little Godzilla in all of us" but more "Godzilla is part of human existence so we'll never be entirely free of him." A vaguely similar sentiment, but more one of penance -- we created Godzilla and must pay the price -- than salvation.

On the plus side, Godzilla 2000 has some good special effects for the era, particularly the shots where Godzilla's smoothly incorporated into the background of some handheld camera footage early on, though the CGI Godzilla they used in some shots here didn't work as well. And despite the problems with the translation of the English dub, it was pretty well-done otherwise. TriStar made a point of getting Asian-American actors, and the dubbing cast is headlined by Francois Chau (the guy from the Dharma Initiative films on Lost) as Shinoda. There’s also a supporting role in the dub for John Cho, which means that both Sulu actors have dubbed Godzilla movies early in their careers, since George Takei was in the dubbing cast for Godzilla Raids Again.

Edited by Christopher, 25 April 2013 - 12:07 PM.

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#16 G-man

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 02:17 PM

Well, I remember catching this film in the theatres with some friends of mine, and it seemed that it was Japan's rebuttal (rw?) to the Tri-Star picture.  All in all, I felt it recaptured the spirit of the films I grew up with and in the end, I could roll with its conceits.

I liked the whole idea behind the G-Network and that it was the daughter running the business side.  I also liked the aspiring reporter who is trying to get her story but circumstances seem to constantly conspire against her.

Katagiri was interesting, and basically in his final scene with Godzilla I always felt that this was the proverbial Showdown.  He has finally come face to face with his enemy, and he would not be the one to walk away.  He got crushed, but hey, no one said that bravery and commonsense were constant bed-fellows.

As for Orga, I liked the discovery scene and it's rising from the depths, that was really effective.  The rest ... well, at least he was an original monster, however, even despite trying to swallow Godzilla one didn't really get the sense that our titular hero was in any danger.

/s/

Gloriosus
the G-man Himself
Let me strive every moment of my life to make myself better and better, to the best of my ability, so that all may profit by it.
Let me think of the right and lend my assistance to all who may need it, with no regard for anything but justice.
Let me take what comes with a smile, without loss of courage.
Let me be considerate of my country, of my fellow citizens, and my associates in everything I say and do.
Let me do right to all, and wrong no man.
-- Doc Savage

Few people want to be moderated, most people see the need for everyone else to be moderated. -- Orpheus

#17 DWF

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 06:57 PM

The American version of Godzilla 2000 is missing about 10 minutes of the film and most of that time rounds out the Godzilla chasers and the female reporter alittle bit more, it's also I think the last Godzilla movie to be released in our theaters and the ending was altered alittle bit from the DVD release.
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#18 G-man

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 07:57 AM

OK, Godzilla vs. Megaguiras - I found this one to be a mixed bag.

On one hand, I did like the eccentric inventor, the major, their interactions, and especially the Griffon, but the narrative, itself, dragged.  Not to mention the whole Dimension Tide falling out of orbit in mere minutes travelling straight down ... they kind of lost me at that point.

Then there was that monster fight at the end just seemed too long and too clunky.  And that Megaguiras had a conventional mouth, as opposed to something more insect-like was distracting.  Then there was the idea that this super-giant-dragonfly would choose to lock-up with Godzilla just ... didn't work.  Then also, the whole hyper-sounds affecting operating systems, electronics, and a satellite in orbit seemed a bit much.

In short, this was far from my favorite film in the Godzilla-Millenium series, albeit the director of it got two more cracks at the franchise with Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla and Tokyo SOS.

/s/

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#19 Christopher

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 08:49 AM

While G v. Megaguirus is imperfect, I think it's one of the more palatable entries in the Millennium series -- really one of the only two I liked, along with GMK. It does have some serious flaws. I could’ve done without the little kid, who’s responsible for massive loss of life and property but completely gets away with it, and whose only real role is to bring the egg to Shibuya, something which could’ve been arranged another way. And the tacked-on final scene is really bad. But I love the worldbuilding, the attempt to develop an alternate history where Godzilla's presence has a real impact on societal development -- even though it isn't really explored beyond the opening newsreel. I think Kiriko is a great character. And I quite like the climactic battle, which is cleverly done and really showcases Godzilla's cunning. Plus it features one of the better non-Ifukube musical scores. (It has the same composer and themes as the two Kiryu films later on.)
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#20 Virgil Vox

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 10:06 AM

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On my blog, I described SpaceGodzilla as "the love child of Godzilla and the Fortress of Solitude from the Superman movies."

Pretty accurate description there.

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I kind of liked the girl here. I thought it was fun that she was the one with more of a head for business than the scientist-hero.

I can see that but she still just came across way too annoying for me.

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The American version of Godzilla 2000 is missing about 10 minutes of the film and most of that time rounds out the Godzilla chasers and the female reporter alittle bit more, it's also I think the last Godzilla movie to be released in our theaters and the ending was altered alittle bit from the DVD release.

Wonder why they cut it out? I would have liked to see more of the chasers and the reporter.

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On one hand, I did like the eccentric inventor, the major, their interactions, and especially the Griffon, but the narrative, itself, dragged.  Not to mention the whole Dimension Tide falling out of orbit in mere minutes travelling straight down ... they kind of lost me at that point.

Pretty much my thoughts, though I didn't have a problem with the Dimension Tide falling. Sure it makes no sense but I was willing to roll with it.

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In short, this was far from my favorite film in the Godzilla-Millenium series, albeit the director of it got two more cracks at the franchise with Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla and Tokyo SOS.

I think he did much better with those films. Megaguirus wasn't badly directed. It just didn't seem to know what to do with itself during the middle section of the movie and it failed it capitalize on the horde of mutant insects running amok.

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But I love the worldbuilding, the attempt to develop an alternate history where Godzilla's presence has a real impact on societal development -- even though it isn't really explored beyond the opening newsreel.

The world-building is what I loved as well. It was nice to see major changes happening because of Godzilla. In most films all they do is beef up the military with mazer tanks and whatnot. Here they move their capital, find an alternative source of energy, and give us a clear time-line for Godzilla attacks.

I will have to re-watch this one again and see if I like it better.
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