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Godzilla Heisei Films

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#41 DWF

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 04:46 AM

I don't get the complaint about Miki, her feelings towards Godzilla changed after Baby was born in Mechagodzilla and really the Yakuza controlling Godzilla isn't the same thing as the governement doing it to keep Japan safe. Destoyer however brought back the horror of Godzilla, it's a shame about the end credits not only are they Ifbuke's final composition but it shows that Toho ignored everything between 1954 and 1984 when they created the Heisei series,
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#42 Christopher

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 09:58 AM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 10 May 2013 - 12:14 AM, said:

I have to say it. If only there was some way to control Godzilla, get him away from populated areas and in a position where G-Force can cool him down. Hmm. Wait a minute. Didn't they have that in the last movie, but Miki thought it was unethical and removed the transmitter that allowed her to control Godzilla? Stupid Miki. And that's the last time I'll bring up that subject. Promise.

Again, don't blame Miki. I think the makers of Destroyer decided to pretty much ignore the events of SpaceGodzilla. There's a passing reference to the island where the young Godzilla (now called Godzilla Junior) had lived, but aside from that, you can easily skip from GvMG2 to this one and treat GvSG as apocryphal.

Besides, wouldn't Godzilla's nuclear-level heat and radiation have destroyed the transmitter anyway?


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Destroyer, despite having a tongue ripped off straight from Alien (as well as being introduced in a sequence reminiscent of Aliens) is a good monster for Godzilla to go out on. There's quite a few of the buggers, they can combine to form into one giant Destroyer, and they were created by the use of the Oxygen Destroyer. It's a nice call back to the original movie. Though I could have done without the sequence where one Destroyer attacked the reporter as she hid in a car. It made the creature look really inept, and the puppet (or man in suit) they used just was not up for a sequence like that. Plus it just dragged on.

I liked the small-scale Destroyers better than the giant one. They had a much creepier head and mouth design, and it was a nice change of pace to get more human-scale action. You very rarely saw people dying in Showa or Heisei-era films -- usually you just saw them running away from buildings which the kaiju subsequently destroyed. There was probably more human-level violence in The Return of Godzilla, but very little in the Heisei films I've managed to see. Here we saw the Destroyers actually take out an entire strike team one by one in a rather intense sequence.


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Kenichi and Yukaro Yamane are okay characters. Kenichi is a bit of a stalker since he wasn't interested in helping G-Force until he found out Miki was there. Yukaro is a reporter who likes to hide in cars from monsters but only seconds later opens the door to check if said monster that was just chasing her is gone. Not the brightest reporter out there.

The cool thing is that the Yamanes are descendants of two of the main characters from the original film. Dr. Yamane was the lead scientist character in the original (and made a cameo in the second film, making him the first recurring human character), and his daughter Emiko, who's brought back in this film as the leads' aunt and played by the original actress, was the female lead. It was really good to see her again, and to see how many connections this film made to the original, making it a true sequel in a lot of ways. (Although these Yamanes are the children of a boy who was orphaned by Godzilla and taken in by the Yamanes in the original film, and GvD reveals that they formally adopted him afterward. He appears in photos but the actor doesn't return.)


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Andoh (or at least his actor) makes a cameo appearance. Since they don't actually name him, I'm going to say he's Andoh and that after quitting the evil corporation he went to work in the TV business. And was that Aoki piloting the Super X3? Looked like him. He's another one that wasn't named, so I'll just pretend it was.

It wasn't. G-films routinely reuse actors as different characters. As I recall, the Super X3 pilot here belonged to the JSDF, not G-Force. And he definitely had a different character name.


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I know we've talked about ir all ready, but it still is confusing that the other movies (before the time travel reboot) made it out like this was the same Godzilla from the original. Here though they say that the original did indeed die at the hands of the Oxygen Destroyer, which means the Godzilla in the first three films was a new Godzilla, and the Godzilla in these last few movies is another Godzilla as well. Throw in Teen Godzilla and that's a lot of Godzillas running around.

As much as I prefer to ignore the time-travel idiocy, the idea in GvKG was that it was the same Godzilla after the time change -- that the Godzillasaurus they removed from the island was (for the sake of argument) the same "second" Godzilla who appeared in TRoG and GvB, but when they moved him away from the island, they inadvertently deposited him in a location where a nuclear sub would then sink, exposing the same individual Godzillasaurus to a greater and more potent type of radiation, so that he turned out even bigger and deadlier. So there are still only three members of the species -- the '54 original (which the time travellers must have overlooked), the second one who showed up in '85 (and was then mutated into a different incarnation through time travel), and Godzilla Junior.


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But wait! Apparently Teen Godzilla sucked up all the radiation let out by Godzilla's death and is now a full blown Godzilla himself, letting out a roar as the movie ends. Not sure how I feel about that. I liked the more somber ending with both Godzilla and Teen Godzilla dead. Though I guess that's too much of a downer. Here at least there's hope.

I found the ending quite confusing. The only reason I know that was Godzilla Junior mutated into a full-size Godzilla was because I read that explanation online. From the film's abrupt ending itself, I would've had no way of knowing that. It looked more like it was just that Godzilla had inexplicably resurrected.

But it is a potential change in the status quo, because Junior is a different kind of Godzilla, more imprinted on humans and more benevolent. Presumably if we revisited the Heisei universe after 1994, we'd find a Godzilla who was more like that of the later Showa films, or that of the 1998 animated series -- friendly to humanity and protecting the world from other kaiju threats. I imagine that G-Force would evolve to work alongside him, to manage and direct his efforts against other kaiju, probably with Beret Girl -- and hopefully a returned Asuza -- as the liaisons.


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It's sad to be done with the Heisei era films. Overall I liked the series. With the exception of the time travel plot and SpaceGodzilla, it was all thumbs up. I liked that the films had continuity between them and that events in one would be referenced in others. A nice change of pace from the Millenium series where each movie (aside from the two Kiryu films) was self-contained. The high point was definitely GvMG2. One of the better Godzilla films, period.

That's pretty much how I felt about them, except I haven't seen the first two. But I kind of liked the way the Millennium series played around with variant possibilities... although ultimately it only had two films that I felt were successful.


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Nor do I think it's really anti-American. Yes, the Godzillasaur kills all the Americans but Godzilla himself kills a lot of Japanese people. It also doesn't sound like Japan is a particularly nice country in the future, even if it is the dominant super-power.

Of course it isn't anti-American, because contrary to what we Americans egocentrically assume, the rest of humanity does not define everything exclusively in terms of America. What it was, in fact, was jingoistically pro-Japanese. It was glorifying the Imperial Japanese military in WWII, but the Empire of Japan wasn't only at war with the United States. They conquered Manchuria and China, warred with the USSR, and occupied part of Southeast Asia before Pearl Harbor even happened, and launched massive invasions of Southeast Asia and the Philippines literally the day after Pearl Harbor. (Or maybe the same day, actually, considering the International Date Line.) The purpose of the Pearl Harbor attack wasn't really about targeting the United States, but about weakening the US military in the Pacific long enough to let Japan secure the conquest of Southeast Asia. Basically they just wanted us out of the way of their domination of Asia and the Southwest Pacific, but it backfired by provoking a more aggressive response from us than they'd expected.

Edited by Christopher, 10 May 2013 - 10:03 AM.

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#43 G-man

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 02:37 PM

Hokay, you've reached the end of the Heisei series.

The Godzilla melt-dwon scenario ... wow, that certainly came out of the blue, and Godzilla musta had one heck of an ulcer to actually have glowed.  I mean, it was an interesting thought experiment and a good way to devise the demise of Godzilla; but then we had the Destroyers which, well, complicated things, especially with the debut of the next generation of Super-X.  I forget whether it incorporated any of the features of Mecha-Godzilla or not.  However, I thought the ending was well handled with whole "the King is Dead; Long Live the King!" deal.

Destroyah/Destroyer, OTOH, just struck me as being too ... busy (design-wise).  Then the fact that Destroyah/Destroyer was sporting a similar color-scheme to the melting Godzilla, with the action filmed at night ... I wasn't particularly impressed.  Of course, it didn't help that I would see the Assault of Legion at around the same time (or soon after) I caught this film.*  In fact, I recall thinking that the director of Assault of Legion had been inspired by Destroyer and wished to show how to do it right ;) At the least, I preferred his offering of the two.

All in all, though, this was a good way to end the Heisei-series.

*I was collecting the Heisei Godzilla films at conventions which normally had them in some form about a year after its release in Japan.  Whereas, I got to see Assault of Legion on the big screen in the Japanese Cultural Center, I think this was the same year it had been released.  So due to the lag in one and promptness of the other, I think I saw them within a month or two.

/s/

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Edited by G-man, 10 May 2013 - 02:42 PM.

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#44 Christopher

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 03:47 PM

By the way, the official name of the "red-hot" version of Godzilla in this film is Burning Godzilla.
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#45 DWF

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 04:04 PM

View PostChristopher, on 10 May 2013 - 09:58 AM, said:

View PostVirgil Vox, on 10 May 2013 - 12:14 AM, said:

Nor do I think it's really anti-American. Yes, the Godzillasaur kills all the Americans but Godzilla himself kills a lot of Japanese people. It also doesn't sound like Japan is a particularly nice country in the future, even if it is the dominant super-power.

Of course it isn't anti-American, because contrary to what we Americans egocentrically assume, the rest of humanity does not define everything exclusively in terms of America. What it was, in fact, was jingoistically pro-Japanese. It was glorifying the Imperial Japanese military in WWII, but the Empire of Japan wasn't only at war with the United States. They conquered Manchuria and China, warred with the USSR, and occupied part of Southeast Asia before Pearl Harbor even happened, and launched massive invasions of Southeast Asia and the Philippines literally the day after Pearl Harbor. (Or maybe the same day, actually, considering the International Date Line.) The purpose of the Pearl Harbor attack wasn't really about targeting the United States, but about weakening the US military in the Pacific long enough to let Japan secure the conquest of Southeast Asia. Basically they just wanted us out of the way of their domination of Asia and the Southwest Pacific, but it backfired by provoking a more aggressive response from us than they'd expected.

I agree it was a silly complaint when I heard it, but then few Americans understand there's more than one side to a war.
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#46 Virgil Vox

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 08:23 PM

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I don't get the complaint about Miki, her feelings towards Godzilla changed after Baby was born in Mechagodzilla and really the Yakuza controlling Godzilla isn't the same thing as the governement doing it to keep Japan safe.

I know it changed, but it did seem rather abrupt. She didn't seem to have much of a connection to Baby in the movie. But it was really her actions in SpaceGodzilla that just grated on my nerves. And the government did get the technology back from the Yakuza.

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I liked the small-scale Destroyers better than the giant one. They had a much creepier head and mouth design, and it was a nice change of pace to get more human-scale action. You very rarely saw people dying in Showa or Heisei-era films -- usually you just saw them running away from buildings which the kaiju subsequently destroyed. There was probably more human-level violence in The Return of Godzilla, but very little in the Heisei films I've managed to see. Here we saw the Destroyers actually take out an entire strike team one by one in a rather intense sequence.

That was a good sequence. I was not expecting there to be multiple Destroyers and for them to start out human sized. My only real complaint about that sequence is when one chases the reporter and attacks the car. It comes off as really dumb in that sequence.

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The cool thing is that the Yamanes are descendants of two of the main characters from the original film. Dr. Yamane was the lead scientist character in the original (and made a cameo in the second film, making him the first recurring human character), and his daughter Emiko, who's brought back in this film as the leads' aunt and played by the original actress, was the female lead.

Watching GvD made me realize I would appreciate some stuff more if I had seen the original. I need to buy the Godzilla Collection that has both the Japanese and American versions of the first film.

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It wasn't. G-films routinely reuse actors as different characters. As I recall, the Super X3 pilot here belonged to the JSDF, not G-Force. And he definitely had a different character name.

Sad. Still, he was never named so I'll continue to think of him as Aoki.

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I found the ending quite confusing. The only reason I know that was Godzilla Junior mutated into a full-size Godzilla was because I read that explanation online. From the film's abrupt ending itself, I would've had no way of knowing that. It looked more like it was just that Godzilla had inexplicably resurrected.

I had read before that it was Teen Godzilla that became the new Godzilla otherwise I would have been confused as well.

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Of course, it didn't help that I would see the Assault of Legion at around the same time (or soon after) I caught this film.*  In fact, I recall thinking that the director of Assault of Legion had been inspired by Destroyer and wished to show how to do it right ;) At the least, I preferred his offering of the two.

I was surprised to see that the last few Godzilla films came out in close proximity to the Gamera films. No offense to the Godzilla films, but the first two Gamera films look better. Maybe they just had a bigger budget to work with.
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#47 DWF

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 09:45 PM

I think Miki still had a powerful connection to JR, I first saw the movie on tape it was recorded in the theater and you could hear the din of the theater goers up to the point when Miki is crying over Jr. then the din on the tape goes silent. Miki was losing her powers and thanks to the other telepath she began to think of settling down and raising a familly.

And I have to disagree with Christopher, I thik Toho just ran out of ideas and decided to end the series, while Spacegodzilla was a misstep at the box office Destroyer was a huge hit.
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#48 Christopher

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 09:52 PM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 10 May 2013 - 08:23 PM, said:

I know it changed, but it did seem rather abrupt. She didn't seem to have much of a connection to Baby in the movie. But it was really her actions in SpaceGodzilla that just grated on my nerves.

Like I keep saying, it's best just to dismiss that movie as apocryphal. You can go right from Mechagodzilla II to Destroyer without any significant continuity problems. GvSG conflicts with the rest of Heisei and contributes nothing meaningful to the continuity. And the throughline from MG2's Baby Godzilla to D's Godzilla Junior is much smoother if you ignore the cutesy abomination of SG's Little Godzilla.
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#49 DWF

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 04:38 PM

408719_125952490857315_100003276957229_130878_383989549_n.jpg

I've started rewatching the Heisei movies sarting with the '84 movie. The '84 movie is superior ro the '85 movie that Canon gave us, there's more of an explaination of the newer Godzilla and there's more debate about using nuclear weapons to take out Godzilla and of course the Soviet sup captain tries to stop the missile instead of launching it as it was shown in the American version.

There's some iconic images from the original in the remake/sequel and there's more attention given to Godzilla's size anad scale. There's a greater detail to the destruction of Toyko into it and I liekd the idea of Godzilla absorbing radiation. But you have to wonder why the bird lure wasn't reused since it was so successful at leading Godzilla away from Japan.

Edited by DWF, 20 May 2013 - 04:10 PM.

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#50 G-man

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 09:17 AM

^^^ I think because the lure conceptually reduced the threat of Godzilla, unless one argues that another daikaiju's challenge will over-ride the bird-calls.

But, then again, I could see it being used as a first use option, if only because it can be readily deployed, and has proven that it could lure Godzilla away from major population centers.  It's when that fails that you would call out Super X 2.0 (or some such) to attempt to duke it out with the big G; and generally, its failure would be a sure sign that our gang has missed something.

/s/

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#51 Virgil Vox

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 04:44 PM

I wish I had a copy of the original '84 film. For that matter, I wish the entire Heisei era were re-released on DVD with the Japanese audio tracks. Only GvB and GvMG2 have that. Those films deserve better treatment. If the new Godzilla reboot does well, hopefully they will get re-released.

That's right, they never did use the bird lure again. I can understand why. Godzilla can be stopped immediately and led away to his fiery death again. Still, an explanation why it was never used again would be nice.
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#52 Christopher

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 12:26 PM

I finally got my hands on Godzilla vs. Biollante, and here's a repost of my blog review:

This is a tough film to summarize, since it has a convoluted plot. But it has interesting and ambitious ideas that unfortunately suffer in the execution. In the wake of Godzilla’s 1984 attack on Tokyo in The Return of Godzilla (after which he ended up buried in a volcano), we see that a number of factions are battling to obtain a sample of Godzilla’s cells to study their remarkable regenerative properties: the Japan Self-Defense Force, an American terrorist group called Bio-Major, and an Arab country called Saradia, whose lead agent/assassin ends up with the prize. A Saradian biotech firm is working with Dr. Shiragami (Koji Takahashi) and his daughter Erika to develop hybrid crops to make the desert bloom, and Shiragami wants Godzilla cells to make them indestructible. Although it’s hard to figure that out from the original Japanese audio track, since the actors are speaking in awkwardly translated and badly pronounced English, with Japanese subtitles. (The first dialogue spoken in the movie is all in English, so at first I thought I’d selected the wrong audio track on the DVD.) Anyway, a Bio-Major bombing kills Erika, leading Shiragami to swear off further research with Godzilla cells, due to what I’m going to assume is a grief so profound that it permanently robs him of the ability to form facial expressions. Seriously, even the rubber Godzilla mask is less deadpan than this guy.

Five years later, Shiragami is working with the roses Erika was with when she died, and he’s working with the 17-year-old psychic Miki Saegusa (Megumi Odaka) because he thinks Erika’s soul is in the roses somehow. Miki, of course, will be a regular character for the rest of the series, but here her role is secondary, basically just a walking exposition engine. The female lead is Asuka (Yoshiko Tanaka), who apparently works for the “Japan Psyonics Center” [sic] that studies Miki and other psychic children. There’s a nice chilling moment where all the psychic kids draw pictures of what they dreamed, and they all hold up drawings of Godzilla. It seems he’s awake and moving under the volcano. This lets the government convince Shiragami to work on using Godzilla cells to develop anti-nuclear energy bacteria (ANEB) that can be used as a weapon against Godzilla. There’s an interesting attempt to touch on the kind of ethical questions the original film raised, because bacteria that could neutralize nuclear materials, while potentially beneficial for cleaning up disasters or fighting kaiju, could also be turned into weapons and disrupt the global balance of power. As with the Oxygen Destroyer, the threat of Godzilla compels the weapon’s development despite the risks. But the terrorist groups want the ANEB too, and Bio-Major plants bombs to release Godzilla from the mountain to blackmail the government into giving up the ANEB. But the Saradian assassin fouls up the exchange, the bombs go off, and Godzilla’s free.

I almost forgot — meanwhile, Shiragami has crossed G-cells with rose cells and some of Erika’s surviving cells because… I don’t know, he’s basically insane, I guess. And this has somehow created the plant monster Biollante, with killer vines and stuff. Biollante ends up planted in a lake, a giant fat stem with arms and tendrils and a rose-head with teeth in the middle — one of the least intimidating kaiju ever. Godzilla is drawn to it, sensing his cloned cells within it, and they have a fight that’s rather dull because Biollante is stationary throughout. Godzilla eventually sets it on fire and it seems to burn up, but sparkly spores or something rise into the sky and Shiragami says something about Biollante being immortal that everybody (including him) subsequently ignores. After this detour, we get back to the plot as the military tries to deter G from reaching a nuclear power plant to recharge, since the Heisei Godzilla feeds on nuclear energy. The main military characters are Lt. Gondo (Toru Minegishi), a snarky/tough comic hero type I rather liked, and Major Kuroki (Masanobu Takashima), who’s more ultraserious and is in charge of remote-piloting the Super X 2, a high-tech flying machine whose main weapon is the Fire Mirror, an array of synthetic diamonds for reflecting Godzilla’s atomic ray back against him, and which works about as well as human weapons ever do against Godzilla (i.e. it works at first but he then rallies and overwhelms it).

Miki’s most striking moment in the film is when she faces down Godzilla alone to try to telepathically or telekinetically nudge him to divert or delay his march on Osaka. But it’s unclear what, if anything, she accomplishes, since Osaka is soon being trampled underfoot (but maybe she gave them more time to evacuate it). Gondo retrieves the ANEB from the Saradians and puts it in shells to fire at Godzilla. Gondo gets in a nice heroic jab at Godzilla, with both weapon and wisecrack, before Godzilla gets his own back. But the ANEB doesn’t seem to work, and the brain trust deduces that it’s because this giant, intensely energetic, nuclear-powered monster has a very low body temperature because he’s cold-blooded. Uhh, yeah, right. So they use an experimental “Thunder Controller” technology to heat him up so the bacteria can grow and kill him from the inside. Oh, and Biollante’s spores rain down and it regrows into a final form whose head now looks like a cross between Audrey II and a crocodile, and she (?) holds Godzilla at bay for a while… but it’s the bacteria that finally do G in (at least enough that he has to retreat into the cooling ocean to hold them at bay, ending the threat for now). Then the various human-level plots are resolved somewhat anticlimactically.

Wow, that was a longer summary than I intended, but it’s hard to encapsulate this story briefly because there are so many entangled threads. But they don’t really come together into a very coherent story. Most frustratingly, the thread about Biollante, one of the title characters of the movie, is the most expendable plotline of the lot. Biollante doesn’t even defeat Godzilla, just has a random fight with him in the middle of a sequence of human technology defeating Godzilla. There’s some half-baked moralizing about the dangers of genetic engineering, with Biollante as the poster child for the monsters it could create, but Biollante doesn’t really cause any harm except to a couple of Bio-Major terrorists. Mostly it’s just there for Miki to stare at and talk about how Erika’s soul is inside it, or not, or whatever.

There are some good ingredients here. Gondo is a good character, well-played. The attempt to use kaiju to address ethical questions about the development of dangerous technologies is a nice callback to the original, even if it lacks payoff and is weakened by Takahashi’s totally wooden performance. And there’s merit to the idea of adding Miki, a character who can sense Godzilla’s thoughts and give him a “voice” of sorts, which is a useful storytelling device; but there’s essentially zero attempt to give her any personality yet, unless you count her one impressive moment, her fearlessness in standing up to Godzilla and making him flinch (though I’m still not clear on what the heck she was supposed to be doing and whether she succeeded). But ultimately it ends up as kind of a jumble, and the parts that don’t work overwhelm those that do. All in all I’d call it a weak film with some very good touches here and there. (Like a scene set in a Godzilla Memorial Restaurant in Tokyo, in a building that still has an unrepaired Godzilla claw mark in its wall with windows built within it. That’s a nice bit of worldbuilding.)

The music is a mixed bag too — literally a mix of reused Akira Ifukube cues (including the lively Godzilla main theme, the more ponderous Godzilla horror theme, and the oddly cheerful military march from the original film) and new music by Koichi Sugiyama, which is a mix of styles. Some of Sugiyama’s music is nice, but his Super X 2 leitmotif has a kind of cliched heroic-music sound, a very “Off We Go Into the Wild Blue Yonder” quality. The wackiest bit is his motif for the terrorists, which is a ’70s-funk remix of the Godzilla main theme. (It’s Charlie’s Angels vs. Godzilla!) All in all, it’s pretty inconsistent, like the film itself.
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#53 G-man

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 11:03 AM

Hmmm ... I had always figured the Bio-Major was a US Corporation engaged in corporate espionage with "security consultants" as opposed to an international terrorist organization.  But given the bomb at the Saradia laboratory, maybe them as terrorists isn't so far off the mark.

I also liked that the film actually detailed the JSDF's Godzilla protocol.  It made sense that something like this would be developed, and I simply loved the character of Gondo, he was the true standout of the cast, while the other characters came across as being fairly generic.

Then also, I liked the idea of the corporations and states (Saradia, Bio-Major, and Japan) were fighting a shadow war over the commodity that was the G-cells.  That simply made so much sense to me, and, of course, the subsequent frustrations our heroes were experiencing when they want to focus on Godzilla, and must deal with these other entities as well.  It's kind of refreshing (in a misanthropic way) to see people behaving badly even in the face of a larger threat ... albeit, this harkens back to the goings on in such classic Toho flicks as Dogora and Ghidarah, the Three Headed Monster.

/s/

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Let me take what comes with a smile, without loss of courage.
Let me be considerate of my country, of my fellow citizens, and my associates in everything I say and do.
Let me do right to all, and wrong no man.
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#54 Christopher

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 11:11 AM

^Yeah, one thing that's definitely to the film's credit is the imaginative way it explores the consequences Godzilla's presence has on the world's culture, politics, and science. I like that kind of worldbuilding -- we saw something similar in Godzilla vs. Megaguirus.
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#55 DWF

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 08:19 PM

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Godzilla VS Biollante has an interesting history it came about from a story contest Toho held to and create new stories and new monsters, the winner of the contest was Shinichiro Kobayashi a dentist and fan it was massively rewritten by director Kazuki Omori. According to G-Fan it held the record for the most uses of the heat ray with 42, at least at the time I don't know if that record has been eclipsed.

Unlike the '84 movie this one has a number of realized characters centered around Kunihiko Mitamura's Kazuhito Kirishima. He's Shiragami's assistant, the boyfriend of Miki's handler and friends with Gondo, allowing his to be apart of all the major plotlines.

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This movie is also a bit famous for it's cut scenes, including the stop motion scene that while filmed was never a part of any of the cut scenes, since it lacked continuity with scenes it was meant to be a part of.

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I liked the explaination for the rating of the movie on the DVD. Personally I like the movie, it's a wonderful action movie with plenty of interesting and pretty well developed characters. It's possible the first Godzilla movie to develop the characters long before we see Godzilla which was about 42 minutes into the movie, aside from the flashbacks to the last movie. This movie to me really set the tone for the rest of the Heisei series, it contains a major theme, developed characters and it wasn't a short movie either coming in at 105 minutes. A scene from the movie made it's way to Mars Attacks. And Biollante appears in the video games later on
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#56 Virgil Vox

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:27 AM

Glad to see Biollante getting some love. I liked the movie, and the monster herself. It's too bad Biollante never showed up in another movie since it was a cool creature design and different than most of the other monsters.

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Godzilla, King of the Monsters was on TV a while back and I watched it and meant to review it sooner and just kept forgetting to. Honestly, the movie was a bit of a mixed bag. I thought it would be like Godzilla 1985, with dubbed voices and new scenes inserted. Which it does have, but it also seems to skip over a lot important plot points and has Steve Martin narrate a lot of what is going on. It really hurt the film. Take for instance the teen that survives Godzilla's attack on his village but his parenst get killed. He moves in with the other main characters, but I have no idea if he was related to them or if they took him in out of pity.

That being said, the movie still has a lot going for it. I like the slow build up until Godzilla finally surfaces and destroys Tokyo. That part of the movie still holds up well. Sure, it may be really outdated but it still packs a wallop. I did like Steve Martin narrating what was going down. The ending was effective as well. Serizawa's sacrifice is a good message that just because we can make horrible weapons of mass destruction doesn't mean we should use them.

Now I want to watch the original and see just what was cut and how it changes the film.
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#57 Christopher

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 08:00 AM

^King of the Monsters is a vastly inferior film to the original. It leaves out so much of the story -- the rich characterizations, a lot of the ethical dilemmas, and some of the plot points as you noted. And of course it totally glosses over the Hiroshima/Nagasaki analogy and the Americans' implied responsibility for the disaster (since it was their nuclear tests that unleashed Godzilla; the film was in fact an allegorical protest of the US nuclear tests that had killed a crew of Japanese fishermen earlier in 1954 and caused radioactive fallout to contaminate Japan).

I also couldn't stand the "actress" they dubbed Emiko with. Momoko Kochi gave such a poignant, powerful performance in the film, and it's infuriating to watch her speak with passion and sincerity about deeply emotional issues while her dubbed voice is so flat and detached that it sounds like she's discussing the weather (and inexplicably has a Southern accent to boot).
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#58 DWF

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 08:58 PM

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The story of Wilson, Grenchiko and Emmy Kano stealing a time machine in the 23rd century to to try and force Japan to into accepting their control. They are aided in this quest by writer Tarasawa, Miki Saegusi and Pro. Mazaki. Going back to 1944 they remove the dinosaur from Lagos island, after the dinosaur saved a Japanese garrison lead by Shindo, who would later build Japan into the world power that the Earth Union wanted to prevent.

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This movie saw the retrun of Akira Ifukube as the composer and he brought back the old Ghirdorah theme and lower pitched version of the Godzilla theme. In the above scene, the Ghirdoarh theme was used as it was in Ghirdorah: The Three Headed Monster when it was used to accompany the destruction of Tokyo by Ghirdorah, but being a longer scene he had add one of the action themes of the movie to finish the scene, before returning to the Ghirdorah theme as Emmy witnesses the destruction of the city.

Enraged Shindo uses a nuclear sub to recreate Godzilla under the illusion that Godzilla will fight for Japan again.

Kazuki Ormi is again writer and director and it's clear he wanted to reboot Godzilla after Biollante. The size of the new Godzilla is 100 meters and can it caused an argument between Ormi and visual effects director Koichi Kawakita. The new Godszilla's size can gauged here in the finale of the movie while Godzilla is standing next to the 193 meter tall Toyko Towers.

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The battles between Ghirdorah and Godzilla were incredible in my mind and I greatly enjoyed the action on the flying saucer including Tarasawa's "Make my day!" before destroying the computer meant for Japan. The last 40 odd minutes of the movie is pretty fast paced and includes many good visual effects. I liekd the scene right after Godzilla rises out of the ocean and walks by the farm, the size comparison between Godzilla and a herd of cows was a fine effect.

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The finale was a complicated affair of old fashioned wire work and some early CGI as well. I was able to see some of it while it was being filmed and it looked much different during filming than the finshed product.

Personally I love the movie, but even during my first viewing of it I wondered where Ghirdorah had been between the destruction of Lagos island and his first appearance in Japan. And of course a number of people remember Godezilla even after he was wiped from time. But it was a wild movie with the first use of time travel in the history of the series. Whatever logic problems are brought up because of this movie in Space Godzilla and Destroyer is the fault of those movies, this movie would set up events to come.
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#59 G-man

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 09:46 AM

Well, part of the idea behind up-scaling Godzilla was the fact that the urban landscapes in Japan had so grown since the 1950's that they dwarfed the original 45m Godzilla, and the director wanted Godzilla to still dominate the cityscape.  The drawback though is that as you upscale Godzilla, the models et al. must be downsized to the point where one simply won't get the level of detail in the buildings and model work that was evident in the earlier films.

/s/

Gloriosus
the G-man Himself
Let me strive every moment of my life to make myself better and better, to the best of my ability, so that all may profit by it.
Let me think of the right and lend my assistance to all who may need it, with no regard for anything but justice.
Let me take what comes with a smile, without loss of courage.
Let me be considerate of my country, of my fellow citizens, and my associates in everything I say and do.
Let me do right to all, and wrong no man.
-- Doc Savage

Few people want to be moderated, most people see the need for everyone else to be moderated. -- Orpheus

#60 Christopher

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 10:50 AM

^Which isn't really an issue in the age of CGI. It's more a matter of suspension of disbelief. Even a 45-meter Godzilla is impossible as a land-dwelling biped, but 120 m or more is just preposterous.
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