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The trumpet before 1910.


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#1 gsmonks

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 11:27 PM

I think we all know what the modern "trumpet" looks like: a bright, shiny horn with 3 piston valves. I say "trumpet" because a trumpet it is not. It is a cornet, and was marketed as such before Conn got the bright idea of selling their "long-model cornet" with a trumpet receiver and mouthpiece, and marketing it as a "trumpet" as a marketing gimmick. They likewise pulled this trick with their soprano trombone, which they sold as a "slide trumpet" if it came with a trumpet mouthpiece, and a "slide cornet" if it came with a cornet mouthpiece.

Prior to 1910, the trumpet was a great big heavy beast with rotary valves that looked and sounded like this:

The excerpt he played is from this piece of music (if the "French" horns look funny, it's because they're French Perinet horns in C with an ascending valve, a French tradition):

Here's what a full section of real trumpets sounds like (turn it up good 'n' loud):

This concludes today's lesson in music history :)

Edited by gsmonks, 15 May 2017 - 11:33 PM.

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#2 gsmonks

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 11:29 PM

PS- those are real 19th century big wooden military snare drums providing the crescendoed rolls in the Von Suppe, not the modern variety you see as played by a rock drummer.
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#3 gsmonks

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 11:39 PM

Here's what the 17th to 19th century snare drum looked and sounded like:
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#4 gsmonks

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 06:56 PM

Here are four of the standard snare drum types used in the US today. #1, the oldest type, is my personal favourite. This is a modern replica made by Cooperman. That's around $2300 of drum you're looking at. If I had the deep pockets . . . the custom artwork alone for that model is over $600. The modern snare drum sounds like a tinny little toy by comparison:


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#5 gsmonks

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 06:17 PM

The general public rarely gets to see period instruments. Here is the Mozart clarinet concerto played on a clarinet from the period. Yes, it doesn't look anything like the modern clarinet:


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#6 gsmonks

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 02:46 AM

When the words "piano", "organ", and "keyboard" are mentioned, most people have an image in their mind of what an instrument keyboard looks like.

Well, there are actually several types of keyboards. The most common is the "asymmetrical", which was invented in the 14th century. But there are several others. Here is a piano that uses the Janko keyboard system, which is actually a much better system that the asymmetrical: .



Keyboards have been around since at least the 3rd century BCE. The Greek hydraulis was the instrument Nero played as Rome burned, and not the fiddle (which wouldn't be invented for many hundreds of years) or the lyre:


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#7 gsmonks

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 02:51 AM

Keyed brass was a phase in brasswind evolution that lasted around 100 years, from ca 1750 to 1850, although the ophicleide hung on until the 1920's.



Keyed brass has a very distinctive sound that's experiencing a revival:



Here's the ophicleide, played by virtuoso Patrick Wibart. It's probably fitting that he's a young upstart who's kicking all us older players' butts:



Here he is on the ophicleide's predecessor, the serpent, invented in 1590 by Edme Guillaume:



Here's the ophicleide and serpent together in the iconic dies irae of Berlioz' Fantastic Symphony:



This is a recreation of the 1839 original orchestration, before Berlioz butchered it by "modernising" it.
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