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Difficult loosing my weight


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#1 SamantaS

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 08:08 AM

Hi all, I'm new to it and I'm glad to be directed here.
I'm 22 years old and I have difficulties loosing my weight. My top weight was 185 pounds when I was in the 8th grade and 5 feet tall. Since then it has been fluctuating plus minus 5-10 pounds. For me dieting is a horrible idea. I can't imagine limiting myself at 1200 calories a day. It is the bare minimum a person should eat. It's very low and I personally can't do it.
So please, advice. Mybe somebody had similar situation and made it out. Thx

#2 Orpheus

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 12:24 PM

Losing weight is rarely easy, and IMHO there may not be a well-proven "easy" way to take off weight you've had for a long time. Certainly the statistics for keeping the weight off, long term, are not good.

But please don't be discouraged. I had good luck losing weight (I'm down to where I was 20+ years ago, and recently I've been slowly losing more), but I can't recommend the diet I used. It was outstanding for me, with my physiology and lifestyle, but I know far more people for whom it did nothing.

I hate to say this, but if you seriously want to lose weight, you may need professional help. I'd start with a visit to the doctor to assess your overall health (i.e. what kind of diet can you tolerate) and see if there are any conditions that contribute to your weight gain. A nutritionist or personal trainer might also get you started. Actually, your friends can help you get started in many ways (being more active, avoiding pitfalls). Also, at your age, alcohol often contributes to weight gain in several ways (just a thought).

It's a vast topic, and I wish I had more to say, but obviously I don't know anything about you. Good luck! It's worth it!

#3 SamantaS

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 06:10 AM

i waiting some advises about my topic , because i really hope that peoples in this forum can help me)

Edited by SamantaS, 16 October 2017 - 06:18 AM.


#4 SamantaS

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 06:13 AM

View PostOrpheus, on 12 October 2017 - 12:24 PM, said:

Losing weight is rarely easy, and IMHO there may not be a well-proven "easy" way to take off weight you've had for a long time. Certainly the statistics for keeping the weight off, long term, are not good.

But please don't be discouraged. I had good luck losing weight (I'm down to where I was 20+ years ago, and recently I've been slowly losing more), but I can't recommend the diet I used. It was outstanding for me, with my physiology and lifestyle, but I know far more people for whom it did nothing.

I hate to say this, but if you seriously want to lose weight, you may need professional help. I'd start with a visit to the doctor to assess your overall health (i.e. what kind of diet can you tolerate) and see if there are any conditions that contribute to your weight gain. A nutritionist or personal trainer might also get you started. Actually, your friends can help you get started in many ways (being more active, avoiding pitfalls). Also, at your age, alcohol often contributes to weight gain in several ways (just a thought).

It's a vast topic, and I wish I had more to say, but obviously I don't know anything about you. Good luck! It's worth it!
Thank you for your words and advice, you give me hope)

#5 SandyJamson

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 06:20 AM

I had similar situation, overweight standing in front of exausting diet. My friend adviced me exercising as well and eating as much as my body requires however healthy food. He led me all the way. Now I'm 5'9" and 142 pounds.

#6 sierraleone

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 09:06 PM

No success story here. I have actually had 4 blood relatives, 2 co-workers, and 1 family friend, go through gastric by-pass (covered by Canadian government health care if you are above a certain BMI and/or have a co-morbid disorder). That is not an easy path to take either, as they would attest. One has had health issues since, but I am not sure if health issues are related to the surgery or not.

I also am overweight, around 190 pounds I'd guess, and 5 foot nothing. I will share what little wisdom I have.

- There is no short-cut, not even surgery, it is a life style change. It is forever.
One has to change their relationship to food, and depending on where ones relationship to food is problematic, and what crutches one uses that causes problems (convenience and habit being probably the biggest).

- I find the biggest problem for me is organizational. It is hard to change habits when one doesn't have their stuff figured out.
I recently got some tubber-ware to organize one of my cupboards for dried whole foods (nuts/seeds, raisins, coconut, etc.), so that food prep is easier. I got a couple new recipe books. I don't meal plan very well, or make lunches enough for work, so I recently started making jar salads.
Your problems may be different. I luckily like a variety of whole foods, some people may not. Some people may not know how to cook, may not like to cook, or may be dealing with competing needs and wants with a spouse and/or kids.

- Don't starve yourself. Eating too little can backfire, as your body thinks it is being starved and will respond by trying to hold on to weight.
This is probably one of the places where a knowledgeable guide would be most help, as find the optimal amount for your weight and metabolism is not easy peasy. That is not something I am really qualified to speak on.

- Don't let numbers on a scale be your primary guide to success or happiness.
Measuring your weight everyday or even once a week is torture and counter productive. You do not want your self-worth tied up in how you measure on a scale once a week.
Judge yourself on other feelings and milestones. Healthy eating has many benefits outside of weight loss/maintenance.
Are you less groggy/more alert or clear headed? Is your clothes fitting different? Is your skin clearer or more healthy looking? Are you having less digestive issues? Are other medical issues you have being brought under control or helped? Do you have a better sense of well-being overall?
I had joined a gym for 4 months before I had to move for my job. A couple months in I was waiting at a bus stop, and I suddenly realized that I wasn't shifting sore feet as I had normally done before. That was an awesome feeling, just realizing that. And then I shifted my feet for fun doing a little dancing (if you could call it that ;) ) and was even happier as I realized I did not get tired or sore from moving too much either. So look for other things and little victories to appreciate on your journey to health.

- Don't forget to look at other healthy habits.
Adequate sleep is one, and is important and so often overlooked.

Edited by sierraleone, 16 October 2017 - 09:07 PM.

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Rule#1: Believe the Autocrat.
Rule#2: Do not be taken in by small signs of normality.
Rule#3: Institutions will not save you.
Rule#4: Be outraged.
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Rule#6: Remember the future.
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#7 Udgin

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 02:57 AM

Hi SamantaS, I understand your discouragement. I had same problem. My way was with fat burner. There are plenty of them. I used the one containing green tea and raspberry ketones. These are main ingredients which increase energy so you can exercise more and as a result burn more calories. http://drenastim.com...ct-information/


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