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Star Trek: Voyager Season 4 Re-Watch

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#21 Christopher

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 12:33 PM

View PostCybersnark, on 10 August 2018 - 12:26 PM, said:

Data is a singular creation (as are his individually-distinct siblings) of a private citizen who is (as far as anyone knows at the time) dead, and whose work cannot be reproduced. The question of whether or not Data is a person or an object is distinct from the question of who owns that (hypothetical) object --whether person or not, Data has no legal owner (I guess he'd be considered part of the late Dr. Soong's estate, whoever ended up with custody of that).

Data was ruled sentient and thus could not be owned. That ruling would've been made before he was allowed to enroll in Starfleet Academy, though it was relitigated in "The Measure of a Man," again being decided in Data's favor.


Quote

Vic Fontaine is another interesting case, as he's clearly a self-aware hologram, but also seems to have no legal owner; he was created/compiled by Felix, who then gave the program (i.e., transferring ownership) to Julian, who initially rented a holosuite at Quark's (I'm guessing Quark rents by the hour, because Quark).

I think it's unresolved whether Vic is a genuinely sentient being or merely a holodeck character programmed to break the fourth wall, like a 24th-century version of Deadpool or She-Hulk.

Edited by Christopher, 10 August 2018 - 12:33 PM.

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#22 RJDiogenes

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 04:26 PM

View PostCybersnark, on 10 August 2018 - 12:26 PM, said:

Though there's an interesting examination that could be made* of the differences between Data and the EMH's situations.
But one would expect any legal precedents or applicable laws to cover all sentient AIs.

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The Mark-I EMH, by contrast, was created by Lewis Zimmerman; a Starfleet officer working (presumably under Starfleet orders) to create a piece of replicable software for the exclusive use of Starfleet. A lawyer could probably argue that the EMH (and all derivative software) is the property of Starfleet Medical.
Once you create a sentient being, though, you can't own it. It's like having a baby-- you have custody for a while, and limited authority over it, but it is ultimately a free being with rights. The same would apply to a self-aware hologram or android, or even a disembodied AI (minus the eighteen-year waiting period, since it's essentially born fully grown), assuming that there's nothing wrong with it that is irreparable and would cause a court to declare it incompetent.
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#23 Christopher

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 07:18 PM

View PostRJDiogenes, on 12 August 2018 - 04:26 PM, said:

But one would expect any legal precedents or applicable laws to cover all sentient AIs.

The difference is that Data was designed to be sentient, while the EMH was an example of a mass-produced program that was usually nonsentient. So there would've been resistance to accepting the idea that he was different from a normal EMH, that he'd developed full sentience as a result of being left continuously active and required to grow well beyond his programmed parameters. In part because that raises a lot of questions about the potential sentience and rights of other EMHs.
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#24 Virgil Vox

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 01:41 AM

I agree that there are major differences between Data and the Doctor. As Christopher said, the EMH was a program designed to work as an aid on all Starfleet vessels. It wasn't unique. Heck, IIRC, it is an episode in season 4 where viewers are introduced to a newer model EMH so the Doctor isn't even cutting edge anymore.

It would be like if one Siri on some random phone started showing signs of personality. Not many people would be clamoring to say Siri was alive or that all Siris have the capacity for sentience.

I don't remeber Voyager showing a lot of sentient holograms. I think the holograms that the Hirogen eventually get become sentient, but that is because they are constantly in use and have to adapt.

I don't think Voyager ever really addressed the issue of whether all holograms should have rights. I know the first four novels the in the Voyager re-launch tackle the subject of hologram rights but not much is done with the issue beyond those novels.
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#25 Christopher

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 10:09 AM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 13 August 2018 - 01:41 AM, said:

I don't think Voyager ever really addressed the issue of whether all holograms should have rights. I know the first four novels the in the Voyager re-launch tackle the subject of hologram rights but not much is done with the issue beyond those novels.

Those novels were a bit odd in implicitly treating all holograms as equally sentient -- which makes about as much sense as treating all vertebrates as equally sentient. Just because certain types of hologram are more neurally complex, that doesn't mean every random holo-game NPC has an inner life and hopes and dreams. What makes the books salvageable, though, is that the movement to give rights to all holograms is led by a character who's clearly deranged, so his assumption that all holograms are people doesn't have to be taken as objective fact. It's possible to conclude that he just programmed a bunch of nonsentient holograms to follow his orders.

I know that it was the preference of Pocket editor Marco Palmieri (who took over editing the Voyager novels after the four Christie Golden books, when Kirsten Beyer took over) to treat AI sentience in the Trek universe as a rare and exceptional occurrence, which is why the holo-rights arc in those novels was not continued beyond them.

Edited by Christopher, 13 August 2018 - 10:09 AM.

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#26 RJDiogenes

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 06:16 PM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 13 August 2018 - 01:41 AM, said:

I agree that there are major differences between Data and the Doctor. As Christopher said, the EMH was a program designed to work as an aid on all Starfleet vessels. It wasn't unique. Heck, IIRC, it is an episode in season 4 where viewers are introduced to a newer model EMH so the Doctor isn't even cutting edge anymore.  
But once the legal precedent had been established, then any AI who passes whatever the 24th century Turing criteria are should be a legal person.
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#27 Christopher

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 06:58 PM

View PostRJDiogenes, on 13 August 2018 - 06:16 PM, said:

But once the legal precedent had been established, then any AI who passes whatever the 24th century Turing criteria are should be a legal person.

Look at real history. Every time one group has gained an advance in civil rights, it hasn't automatically been extended to other groups; each new step forward has had to be fought for separately. And lots of fights have suffered setbacks and needed to be refought more than once. So this is actually very realistic.


Anyway, while we're on the subject, it's erroneous to think of the Turing Test as "proof" of sentience. It's nothing of the kind. Turing's actual term for it was "the imitation game" -- to him, it was merely about whether an AI could mimic human behavior. It's basically a thought experiment for assessing whether computer programs could be useful as analogies for studying the nature of human intelligence. At most, it's a test of the proposition "Human intelligence is analogous to computer programs," rather than a test of whether a given computer program is sentient. After all, it's relatively easy to create a computer program that can mimic human behavior well enough to fool people, such as a chatbot.
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#28 Virgil Vox

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Posted 27 August 2018 - 08:09 AM

The Raven

This was a big episode for Seven, fleshing out her back story and giving viewers a glimpse into the life she led before she was assimilated. It isn’t much but it will be fleshed out in “Dark Frontier.”

Seven’s progress as she adjusts to life aboard Voyager has been handled deftly by the writing team. It isn’t being rushed. She still sees no need to engage in recreational activities, doesn’t like to sit down, and doesn’t even remember how to eat food. She might have grudgingly made her peace with no longer being a drone but she isn’t ready to accept everything that goes along with being human.

I did like the scene where Neelix teaches Seven how to eat. Jeri Ryan does a great job with the material. Eating seems to go against Seven’s nature since it seems so inefficient.

Harry’s crush on Seven isn’t just swept under the rug. B’Elanna teases him about it here after Seven escapes and later Harry is disappointed that Seven views him as predictable. I know the crush doesn’t go anywhere but it’s cute here at the beginning stages.

I’m not sure that I buy Seven’s Borg powers activating that quickly or being that potent. It felt like earlier episodes went out of their way to say that Seven was more human than Borg and that the Doctor removed most of her Borg components. Having her shields pop back on so quickly and be so effective was a little jarring.
I don’t think the ending needed the battle scene between Voyager and the Bomar. The scene was already tense as Seven started having flashbacks. The Bomar shooting at the ship didn’t really add anything to the scene.

That scene was another powerful one, thanks to Jeri Ryan’s performance. Seven did seem to revert back to her childhood self as the memories came flooding back, even hiding under the console again. It was pretty chilling and showed why the Borg can be horrific villains if used right.

The dialogue between Seven and Tuvok was well written and acted. I think of all the characters on the ship Tuvok is the most likely to understand Seven since her Borg attitude does come across as emotionless and logical at times.

Something else that I appreciated is that Voyager wasn’t able to cross Bomar space and shave three months off their journey. It does seem at times that Voyager gets to have its cake and eat it too but here the ship pays the price for violating Bomar space to save Seven. Honestly, though, with the way the Bomar were acting I don’t think the journey would have shaved off that much time anyways.
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#29 RJDiogenes

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Posted 27 August 2018 - 07:01 PM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 27 August 2018 - 08:09 AM, said:

I don’t think the ending needed the battle scene between Voyager and the Bomar. The scene was already tense as Seven started having flashbacks. The Bomar shooting at the ship didn’t really add anything to the scene.
Yeah, that's one of the things that aggravated me about Voyager, as I mentioned before. It seems like they had to have a token space battle in every episode whether it made sense or not.  Of course, it was a change of audience sensibilities as people were looking for more action than substance, but it aggravated me to see them sell out.
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#30 Christopher

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Posted 27 August 2018 - 10:15 PM

View PostRJDiogenes, on 27 August 2018 - 07:01 PM, said:

Yeah, that's one of the things that aggravated me about Voyager, as I mentioned before. It seems like they had to have a token space battle in every episode whether it made sense or not.  Of course, it was a change of audience sensibilities as people were looking for more action than substance, but it aggravated me to see them sell out.

The original series was the same way with its token fistfights tacked onto almost every episode. The sensibilities were the same back in the '60s; they just had less sophisticated visual effects. And TNG had its obligatory, tacked-on danger plots too, except it tended more toward random technobabble threats to the ship.
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#31 Virgil Vox

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Posted 31 August 2018 - 04:28 PM

View PostChristopher, on 27 August 2018 - 10:15 PM, said:

View PostRJDiogenes, on 27 August 2018 - 07:01 PM, said:

Yeah, that's one of the things that aggravated me about Voyager, as I mentioned before. It seems like they had to have a token space battle in every episode whether it made sense or not.  Of course, it was a change of audience sensibilities as people were looking for more action than substance, but it aggravated me to see them sell out.

The original series was the same way with its token fistfights tacked onto almost every episode. The sensibilities were the same back in the '60s; they just had less sophisticated visual effects. And TNG had its obligatory, tacked-on danger plots too, except it tended more toward random technobabble threats to the ship.

I don't mind the action most of the time. Give me a goof space ship battle and I am happy. Sometimes though they do feel tacked on and don't really add anything to the plot and sometimes they feel like they take away from the plot.
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#32 Virgil Vox

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Posted 23 September 2018 - 02:22 PM

                          
Scientific Method


I quite liked this episode. It was fun and had some tense moments. It also put the spotlight on B’Elanna, Seven, the Doctor, and Janeway making it a pretty good ensemble show.

Two on-going plots are advanced here. The big one concerns Tom and B’Elanna’s relationship. They finally acknowledge that they are in a relationship and that it isn’t purely physical. The two are making out all over the ship like they are back in high school. It is quite funny, especially when Tuvok catches them.

Janeway tells them to lay off the make out sessions, which makes sense. The two acting like randy teenagers does set a bad example for the rest of the crew. Of course, Janeway is harsher than she normally would be thanks to the experiments being done on her.

Tom and Torres do wonder if their relationship only happened because of interference by the aliens but decide it doesn’t matter.

The other plot that is advanced is the Seven/B’Elanna rivalry. Torres has never liked Seven and wasn’t afraid to make her opinion known. Here it looks like Torres is going to go on Seven again because Seven is siphoning power away from Engineering and towards the new astrometrics lab. However, Torres controls her anger and says that she understands what it is like having to make adjustments to a new way of living. The two aren’t best friends but at least the ice is thawing between them.

Seven becomes an important character part way through as she is the only way able to see the aliens and the experiments they are conducting. It makes for a chilling sequence as Seven wanders the corridors and sees all the devices attached to the crewmembers and the aliens monitoring everything.

I loved the scene between Chakotay and Neelix as they try and one up each other over who has the worst genetic deformities. These two characters don’t interact all that often so it was nice seeing them share a small scene together.

The alien scientist that Janeway interacts with is really easy to hate. She has a cold, impersonal demeanor and doesn’t care that their experiments are hurting and killing members of Voyager’s crew as long as they get the research they need.

That makes the ending that much better when Janeway flies the ship through the two binary pulsars, destroying one of the alien ships before it can escape.
Speaking of, the pulsars looked beautiful. A really good CGI job.

This was just a really good episode. Nothing spectacular, but it was entertaining and built on plots from several past episodes.
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#33 RJDiogenes

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Posted 23 September 2018 - 03:58 PM

I remember finding those weird invisible S&M contraptions a bit over the top.  :D
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#34 Virgil Vox

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 05:52 PM

Year of Hell Parts 1 and 2

Despite the fact that this two-parter ends with a giant reset button that makes everything that happened in these two episodes null and void I’d still argue that “Year of Hell” is great Voyager and Star Trek.

I’m sure a lot of fans were hoping that Voyager would have been more of this and less of what we actually got. In these two episodes we saw a glimpse of what the show could have been had it taken a darker, more serialized route.

The basic gist is that Voyager encounters the Krenim, a weak race that is a shadow of its former glory. That swiftly changes when a Krenim time ship, led by a man named Annorax, makes sweeping changes to the time line and restores the Krenim Empire to its full strength. Voyager finds itself in hostile territory facing an enemy with weapons it can’t defend itself against.

There is a lot to talk about and this review will probably jump around a lot.

I do want to talk about Annorax. I think he is one of the better Star Trek villains. This is a nuanced, complicated character played brilliantly by Kurtwood Smith. He easily could have been a mustache twirling villain gleefully wiping out civilizations for the betterment of Krenim kind but fortunately what we got was so much better. Yes, part of what he is doing is to restore the Krenim and make them strong again. However, he originally started out just wanting to help the Krenim against a strong adversary. His calculations produced unintended side effects that caused millions of Krenim to die and his attempt to fix that made things worse, and also wiped out his family.

Annorax is a cursed man, making changes to the timeline in the vain hope that it will restore his family to him. He also wants to bring back many of the civilizations he was wiped out if he can. I really felt like I knew the character by the end of the second episode, and I could sympathize with him. He is a very persuasive man and he does seem honest about wanting to fix as many things as possible. Chakotay must sense this because he works with Annorax to make changes to the time line that will help the Krenim, restore the civilizations, and get Voyager home.

The power that Annorax and his crew wield is massive, and must be very tempting. Who wouldn’t want the power to make large scale changes to the time line to improve their lot in life.

What makes Annorax a villain is that he is obsessed with restoring his family and he doesn’t care if he does leave a trail of erased civilizations in his wake. If he could get his family back by wiping out the entire Delta Quadrant he would.

This actually parallels Janeway’s arc in these two episodes. She also becomes obsessed with protecting her family no matter what. This is a darker Janeway that we see here, willing to cross lines to end Annorax and save her crew. The scene where the Doctor relieves her of command and Janeway says that he has no way of enforcing that decision and that she won’t obey it is chilling.

It is moments like that that truly makes these two episodes. The character drama and the changing dynamics are fascinating to watch, even if we know that it will all be erased and forgotten by the end.

What I truly loved was the new dynamic between Seven and Tuvok. With Tuvok blinded, Seven becomes his aid and the two develop an affectionate rapport. It is really this relationship that I wish could have been carried over after the big reset.

You know things are bad when Neelix is made a member of the security department. You know that Tuvok had to have expressed some emotion when that happened.

I liked the scene with Harry and Torres in the turbolift as they waited for rescue. It was a nice reminder that these two are good friends. I also liked Seven mentioning the events of First Contact. I love little things like that that point to a big shared universe.

The time ship has to be one of the more powerful weapons ever created in ST. It can wipe out entire civilizations effortlessly. It is out of phase so it is hard to track and can’t be damaged. When it is in phase and can be shot with conventional weapons it is still extremely powerful and hard to hurt. It destroys most of the armada Janeway had put together before Janeway does her suicide run.

I could have sworn that Kes warned the crew about the Krenim last year but there was no mention of it here. Maybe I am remembering wrong.

While the conflict is ended in a big space battle and with Janeway ramming Voyager into the time ship what I appreciated about the ending is that it wouldn’t have been possible had it not been for Tom making friends with people on the time ship and sympathizing with their plight. Tom knows what it is like to be on a long voyage and knows what it is to have that fear of never seeing your loved ones again. He found common ground with the crew, which is a very Star Trek theme.

I’m not sure how destroying the time ship resets all the changes and makes it to where Annorax hasn’t even built the time ship yet but you know what? I’m not going to question it.
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#35 RJDiogenes

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 07:08 PM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 26 November 2018 - 05:52 PM, said:

Despite the fact that this two-parter ends with a giant reset button that makes everything that happened in these two episodes null and void I’d still argue that “Year of Hell” is great Voyager and Star Trek.  

Reset buttons don't bother me at all.

Quote

I’m sure a lot of fans were hoping that Voyager would have been more of this and less of what we actually got. In these two episodes we saw a glimpse of what the show could have been had it taken a darker, more serialized route.  

In fact, sometimes I love reset buttons.  :lol:

Quote

This actually parallels Janeway’s arc in these two episodes. She also becomes obsessed with protecting her family no matter what. This is a darker Janeway that we see here, willing to cross lines to end Annorax and save her crew. The scene where the Doctor relieves her of command and Janeway says that he has no way of enforcing that decision and that she won’t obey it is chilling.  

The story was an excellent character study of Janeway. It wasn't the only time that she was driven to extremes, but it was the one story able to do it most cleanly.  Janeway was unique among all the Trek captains in that she had to deal with a situation that none of them ever did, even Kirk and Archer with their increased autonomy out on the frontier.  She not only had complete responsibility for her crew without any possibility of support from Starfleet, but she was also the sole representative of the Federation in that quadrant-- she essentially was the Federation-- and she had to balance her responsibility to her crew with her responsibility to Federation ideals.  It was literally an impossible situation.
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#36 Christopher

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 10:04 PM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 26 November 2018 - 05:52 PM, said:

Despite the fact that this two-parter ends with a giant reset button that makes everything that happened in these two episodes null and void I’d still argue that “Year of Hell” is great Voyager and Star Trek.


I wouldn't go that far. I mean, I agree about it being a glimpse of what the show could've been, in some respects, but at the time, I felt it was a exemplar of what the show had chosen to be instead. I think it was this episode that made me realize that the fundamental difference between DS9 and VGR is that DS9 was where you went if you wanted thoughtful, complex drama driven by characters and ideas, while VGR was where you went if you wanted big, cinematic spectacle and action that was shallow but really well-made. I've always felt that being great Star Trek meant being closer to the former.

Quote

I could have sworn that Kes warned the crew about the Krenim last year but there was no mention of it here. Maybe I am remembering wrong.


The only way the timeline of "Year of Hell" makes sense to me, both with regard to its contradictions with "Before and After" and in terms of its own internal logic (and I use that word very loosely), is if only the closing scene takes place in the Prime timeline, and the rest takes place in a different timeline that existed before the Krenim timeship's effects on history were erased (so that basically its erasure created the Prime timeline, in a sense).
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#37 Virgil Vox

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 08:00 AM

Quote

The story was an excellent character study of Janeway. It wasn't the only time that she was driven to extremes, but it was the one story able to do it most cleanly.  Janeway was unique among all the Trek captains in that she had to deal with a situation that none of them ever did, even Kirk and Archer with their increased autonomy out on the frontier.  She not only had complete responsibility for her crew without any possibility of support from Starfleet, but she was also the sole representative of the Federation in that quadrant-- she essentially was the Federation-- and she had to balance her responsibility to her crew with her responsibility to Federation ideals.  It was literally an impossible situation.

I am a big fan of Janeway. Like you wrote, she had to deal with an impossible situation with a never before tested crew in a hostile region of space with no back-up. She was extremely protective of her crew and these two episodes show that. She was willing to sacrifice herself and Voyager to give her crew a chance of getting home.

Quote

I wouldn't go that far. I mean, I agree about it being a glimpse of what the show could've been, in some respects, but at the time, I felt it was a exemplar of what the show had chosen to be instead. I think it was this episode that made me realize that the fundamental difference between DS9 and VGR is that DS9 was where you went if you wanted thoughtful, complex drama driven by characters and ideas, while VGR was where you went if you wanted big, cinematic spectacle and action that was shallow but really well-made. I've always felt that being great Star Trek meant being closer to the former.

I agree with your assessments about both shows but I think VGR could do the thoughtful, complex drama and I do believe that these two episodes show that. Yes, there is a lot of action and spectacle but it is there to serve the characters. There is a lot of good character work in these two episodes with the Voyager crew and Annorax.
"You will give the people an ideal to strive towards. They will race behind you. They will stumble. They will fall. But in time, they will join you in the sun. In time, you will help them accomplish wonders."
--Jor-El


It's a recession when your neighbor loses his job: it's a depression when you lose yours.
-- Harry S. Truman

#38 RJDiogenes

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 07:02 PM

Trek grew more and more action oriented as time went on as it tried to hang onto an increasingly vapid audience, but it remained pretty strong to the end. I consider all the shows equal in general. True, the series finale of Voyager was a low point, but then so were First Contact and Nemesis.
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#39 Virgil Vox

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 07:51 PM

Random Thoughts

I felt this was a strong episode. The character work was spot-on, the Mari were fleshed out rather well for a one and done species, and the story was engaging. This is another Tuvok mystery episode, similar to Ex Post Facto and Meld.

Something I appreciated was the friendship between Tuvok and Nimira. These are two people who respect each other and feel a kinship with one another. They both understand the other one is just doing their jobs.

It would have been easy to make Nimira a two dimensional villain. We’ve seen plenty of those on Star Trek. Instead she is a good woman doing her job. She believes that Torres is responsible for the violence that several Mari have committed and is simply following the law. She allows Tuvok to run his own investigation even though she truly doesn’t believe he will find anything to exonerate Torres.

The Mari culture was fascinating. They are similar to the Vulcans in that they are a telepathic species that used to be extremely violent and have now found a method to curb that violence and become pacifists. Whereas the Vulcans learned to suppress their emotions and follow logic, the Mari simply outlawed violent thoughts. It seems to have worked since crime and violence have become almost non-existent.

However, there is a seedy underbelly as Tuvok discovers. Quite a few Mari want to savor violent, dark thoughts and a black market for them has sprung up. The Mari usually take them from visiting aliens with no problems but they were not prepared for how powerful Torres’ violent thought was.

The episode ends with no easy answer to this new revelation. Nimira is stunned that people would want to have those thoughts and trade them with each other. Policing thoughts and telling people they can’t have bad thoughts hasn’t been the perfect system like she thought.

This does raise a problem. Why would the Mari trade with other species, if one stray negative thought could possibly infect an innocent Mari and have them go berserk? Also, you would think that they would warn alien visitors about their laws and to watch their thoughts.

This is a good episode for Tuvok and Torres. Tuvok shows what a great investigator he is. He also shows the darker side of Vulcan logic. His emotions aren’t gone; they are suppressed. In fact, his emotions are more intense than many humanoids.

Torres’ struggle reconciling her Klingon side with her human side is commented on here, with Tuvok giving her a compliment (possibly) about how well she stays in control most of the time.

I liked that Neelix developed a crush on someone new. Kes has been gone a while, and the two broke up half way through season 3. It is just sad that it ends in tragedy.

I loved Seven confronting Janeway at the end about all the stops Voyager makes. She has a good point. The crew is prolonging their journey by making all these stops to meet new races and investigate special anomalies. They are also risking losing crewmembers. Janeway’s response is a good one. They stop because they want to. They have a desire to meet new races and add to their knowledge of the universe. I’m sure it also helps morale.

Concerning Flight

Well, that was as middle of the road as you can get. Concerning Flight was a rather bland episode that is easily forgettable. It doesn’t do anything wrong, but it doesn’t do anything memorable either.

I felt that the set-up was good. Pirates with enhanced transporters steal items from Voyager, including the computer core. The crew eventually finds the pirates on a planet and work to get their stuff back.

The fact that this was a Janeway/Leonardo da Vinci hologram team up adventure episode had me scratching my head. There isn’t anything wrong with that idea (and I am a fan of John Rhys-Davies) but nothing much is done with the concept. Leonardo’s idea that he is in America and his interpretation of an alien world were unique but nothing to write home about.

I can’t help but feel like this would have been a better episode if it had been the Doctor on the planet teaming up with Janeway. It is rare we see those two characters interact when someone isn’t sick.

Seven gets some good time to shine as her brusque nature continues to rub people the wrong way. She gets into altercations with Harry and Torres. It isn’t surprising that Seven and Torres argue. That has been a recurring event since Seven joined. Harry, however, still seems to harbor a crush for the ex Borg drone.
The villain was rather forgettable, which is disappointing. A villain who is a pirate with tech stolen from dozens of different races could have been intimidating and interesting. Instead he was utterly forgettable.

I did enjoy the scene where da Vinci and Janeway fly away from their pursuers using da Vinci’s flying machine. It was a really nice moment and a good pay-off to the episode.

I’m finding myself with not much more to say. I didn’t hate this episode but I didn’t really like it either. It is an episode I probably won’t revisit unless I’m watching the entire season again.
"You will give the people an ideal to strive towards. They will race behind you. They will stumble. They will fall. But in time, they will join you in the sun. In time, you will help them accomplish wonders."
--Jor-El


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#40 Christopher

Christopher
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Posted 16 December 2018 - 08:11 PM

I quite liked "Concerning Flight." I even wrote an article about it for Star Trek Magazine back in the Jan/Feb 2012 issue. As I wrote there, "Joe Menosky is a student of history with a special interest in the Italian Renaissance, and in the script of “Concerning Flight” one can see the author taking this opportunity to engage in a dialogue with the greatest mind of the Renaissance, to interrogate him (through Janeway) about his perennial habit of leaving great works uncompleted, while ultimately giving him the fictional opportunity to bring one of his greatest imaginings to completion at last." Which works for Star Trek because (again I quote), "it is a character study of Leonardo da Vinci, the quintessential Renaissance scientist, a genius who dabbled in everything – the archetype of such characters as Spock and Data, and of the Starfleet spirit of exploration and intellectual curiosity."

Okay, so it's self-indulgent on Menosky's part, but I always enjoyed his stories about technology bringing abstract concepts and metaphors to life (e.g. "Masks" or "The Thaw").
"You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right." -- xkcd

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