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Star Trek: Voyager Season 4 Re-Watch

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#61 RJDiogenes

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 08:03 PM

If I remember correctly (Hah :D), this episode was about the recovered memories fad and how, despite its dubiousness, it led to many convictions on flimsy evidence (we're seeing a similar fad now, with people taking pride in believing accusations of rape without evidence, rather than remembering the presumption of innocence). The Doctor was so eager to defend and avenge Seven that he became biased.  More generally, the story was about the fact that sometimes innocent people are punished and guilty people go free, and you don't always know which is which.
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#62 Christopher

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Posted 24 February 2020 - 08:45 PM

View PostRJDiogenes, on 24 February 2020 - 08:03 PM, said:

(we're seeing a similar fad now, with people taking pride in believing accusations of rape without evidence, rather than remembering the presumption of innocence).

The presumption of innocence is for the trial phase. When it comes to the initial accusation that a crime has been committed, the default position should be (and routinely is in most crimes other than rape) to believe the accuser and investigate thoroughly under the presumption that they're telling the truth. After all, the accuser deserves to be presumed innocent of lying as much as the accused deserves to be presumed innocent of the crime; either way, determining the truth should be left to the evidence. Twisting the presumption of innocence into an excuse to presume that rape victims are guilty of lying is a corruption of the principle.

Also, it's a grotesque lie to say that these charges are being believed "without evidence." In cases where there's a single accuser with no corroboration and the investigation fails to support it, as for instance with the charge against George Takei a while back, it generally gets dismissed. The cases where it sticks are the ones where there's corroboration from numerous accusers telling consistent stories, as with Bill Cosby or Harvey Weinstein.
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#63 Virgil Vox

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Posted 22 March 2020 - 07:56 PM

The Killing Game Parts 1 and 2

The Killing Game two parter is basically Voyager’s take on a summer blockbuster. It is filled with action, explosions, Nazis, and villains that get their comeuppance. It does have some larger ideas about the Hirogen and their way of life but for the most part the episode is about blowing things up.

I like these two episodes but I also felt they could have been better. The premise could have been used to really show these characters in a different light. Instead they are placed in WWII-era France and their simulated lives reflect their real lives. Janeway is in command of the resistance cell, Tuvok is still logical, Seven and Janeway still butt heads, Tom and B’Elanna are still in love, etc. The only differences we see are when Janeway is briefly a Klingon and when Neelix is a Klingon.

I did appreciate the look at Hirogen culture and the Alpha’s fears that they were slowly dying as a race. They no longer have a home planet and move further and further apart in search of new prey. He sees the holodeck technology as away to preserve the hunt for his people but also gather them together in the same location.

The WWII setting was okay. It just felt like been there, done that. Star Trek just seems to like using Nazis. The good thing is that Seven and Janeway regain their memories early on so we aren’t stuck with their personas for too long.

The action is well done which is good since that is a big focus of this episode. They really went for it here. They blew a giant hole open on several decks.  They had American troops, Nazis, Hirogen, and Klingons fighting in a battle royale. Janeway blows up sickbay. She gets chased by Turanj throughout the ship.
Of course all this damage will be gone by the next episode but that’s just Voyager.

Jeri Ryan has a good singing voice. IIRC, they will have Seven sing several more times on the series.

I liked that Harry and the Doctor were doing their own resistance movement against the Hirogen. Sure, they were limited in what they could accomplish but without those two the crew would still be serving as prey.

Seven’s line to Turanj about how the Borg will eventually assimilate the Hirogen and on that day she wants him to remember her was pretty cool and effectively delivered by Jeri Ryan.

The ending felt rushed. Turanj kills the Alpha because he doesn’t want to cooperate with prey and he in turn is killed by Janeway. The rest of the Hirogen eventually gives up and Janeway gives them holographic technology in the hopes they will honor what the Alpha wanted to do. It doesn’t really fit with the Hirogen and it doesn’t help that none of them are characters we know.

All in all, this was a big, dumb, action two-parter that brought the loose Hirogen arc of season 4 to a close. We will see the Hunters again in season 7 when Janeway’s decision to give them the holographic technology comes back to haunt her. I feel like I should have more to write about this two-parter but I’m just coming up blank.

Vis a Vis

This was a perfectly fine, middle of the road Voyager episode that focused on Tom Paris. I was entertained while watching it but will probably not revisit it any time soon.

Voyager comes to the rescue of an alien named Steth who is trying out an experimental warp drive. Tom buddies up to Steth because he has become tired of his routine on Voyager and longs for adventure. Steth however seems fascinated by Tom’s life on the ship so much so that he swaps bodies with Tom.

Yes, it is a body swapping episode. Steth has the power to rearrange DNA so that he looks like Tom and Tom looks like Steth’s old body. Steth sends Tom away in his ship and decides to live the good life on Voyager.

Except it isn’t. I’m not sure what Steth was expecting but life on board Voyager isn’t the awesome time he wanted. He has duties to perform, can’t get drunk while on his shift, can’t take off for a romantic weekend with B’Elanna, etc.

Not much is done with the body swapping concept. Steth bumbles around a bit as Tom and we get a few amusing bits like his talk with the Doctor or his drunken exchange with Seven but that’s about it.

Tom is quickly discovered by the real Steth, who is now in the body of a female alien. She agrees to help Tom fix the ship and get back to Voyager and put everyone back in their real bodies.

Steth, knowing the jig is almost up, exchanges bodies with Janeway. This gave Kate Mulgrew a chance to chew the scenery a little and it is a lot of fun. I wish she had been playing Steth for longer.

The episode ends with Tom realizing that his life on Voyager isn’t as bad as he believed and that spending time with B’Elanna is a good thing.

I really can’t think of anything else to say about this episode. It was fine. I’m sure I’ve already forgotten parts of it but I wasn’t bored nor did I hate it.
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#64 RJDiogenes

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 06:36 PM

View PostVirgil Vox, on 22 March 2020 - 07:56 PM, said:

The Killing Game two parter is basically Voyager’s take on a summer blockbuster. It is filled with action, explosions, Nazis, and villains that get their comeuppance. It does have some larger ideas about the Hirogen and their way of life but for the most part the episode is about blowing things up.

I remember this happened, but I don't remember any details about it. I remember more details about the "Year From Hell" episodes, and that's not much.  I find the action blockbusters tiresome, and the thing about Voyager is that they were relying more and more on token action sequences to try to hang on to the dwindling audience.

Quote

I did appreciate the look at Hirogen culture

I didn't like the Hirogen much.  Just another warrior race there to be villain of the piece. Not very interesting.

Quote

Janeway’s decision to give them the holographic technology comes back to haunt her.

I'm also tired of people's well-meaning decisions coming back to haunt them.

Quote

Steth, knowing the jig is almost up, exchanges bodies with Janeway. This gave Kate Mulgrew a chance to chew the scenery a little and it is a lot of fun. I wish she had been playing Steth for longer.  

Yeah, the actors love it when they get to play against type.

Quote

The episode ends with Tom realizing that his life on Voyager isn’t as bad as he believed and that spending time with B’Elanna is a good thing.  
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#65 Christopher

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 06:54 PM

View PostRJDiogenes, on 23 March 2020 - 06:36 PM, said:

I didn't like the Hirogen much.  Just another warrior race there to be villain of the piece. Not very interesting.

Not really a warrior race -- a predator race. War and hunting are rather different activities. War requires a large, organized population all devoted to a single cause. Hirogen were more like wolves, hunting in small packs spread out over a wide territory. Their predator psychology made them distinctive, and I thought they were probably Voyager's most effective recurring villain species. (Although that's faint praise given that the competition includes the Kazon, the Malon, and those potato people from the Hierarchy. Although I thought the potato people were cute.)
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