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UFO Star Trekkin' through the universe?


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#1 gsmonks

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 02:40 PM

https://www.standard...t-a3983796.html

What's inexplicable is the fact that this object accelerated, to the tune of 10,000 kph, away from the Sun's gravitational pull.

I would say it's just a rock tweedling through our neck of the woods, but that stunt of accelerating away from the Sun . . . now that is odd.


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#2 Orpheus

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 07:59 AM

I don't have time to fully comment right now, but yes, Oumuamua displays a few anomalies that have scientist genuinely curious. It certainly interests me.

In [almost] frictionless interstellar/interplanetary space, a sub-1% deviation or 1% of 1% DEMANDS explanation. Even 1% of 1% of 1% can't  be overlooked. But we must establish a base scale: What is "1%"

For example, (I apologize that I don't have time to look up the specifics) a random uncorellated object from some random place in the universe would gain 42 km/s in velocity from our Sun's gravity, if its path fortuitously happened to put it very near our Sun -- which is made more likely because any star's gravity tends to funnel random objects/paths closer to that star. For perspective, we should note that almost all such objects will lose essentially the same velocity on its way out of the Solar System [barring interactions in the solar system] and 42 km/s ("the energy of falling almost into the sun") is 151,200 kph. If we assume it came from another star, it  would have an added velocity due to the velocity of that star relative to us. The starts nearest us have an average velocity difference of 30 km/s (108,000 kph). if it came from the other side of the galactic core, it would have an initial relative velocity on the order of 440 km/s = 1,584,000 kph. We have no reason to assume it came from the other side of the core (and indeed, its observed relative velocity suggests that it didn't), but it's a valid comparison.

As I recall, the actual deviation from the expected trajectory was MUCH smaller than the "10,000 kph" reported, but even that number that doesn't seem huge compared to the 42km/s + 30 km/s = 151,200 kph + 108,000 kph [not in the same direction] that would be typical for an object from a nearby star -- forget the 1,584,000 kph if it started on the other side of the galactic core or the potentially huger number if it came from another galaxy.

Again, sorry for not having the specific number, but relative speed scale is really important here. You could brag that you've flown in a plane at "a million kph" -- but who hasn't, relative to another star in our galaxy?

#3 Orpheus

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 08:20 AM

Opps. Meant to mention that Oumuamua would have been unremarkable (and unnoticed) if it hadn't passed close to the Earth. As I write this on Saturday Nov 10,2018, THREE comparable objects [i.e within an order of magnitude in mass) will be passing even closer to Earth. In the article, Oumuamua is compared to a famous skyscraper in London ("the Gherkin" or 30 St Mary Axe); today' asterous are shorter (2 are up to 10 stories tall, one is up to five stories tall, all are relatively wider/thicker than cigar-shaped Oumuamu) -- but there are three of them today alone, all much closer to Earth: Oumuamua passed us at 85 "lunar distances" (distance from the Earth to its Moon), while today's astroids will pass at 1, 3.4 and 12 lunar distances, respectively

#4 gsmonks

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Posted 13 November 2018 - 02:48 PM

I heard an explanation as to why it's elongated shape, but I was driving and couldn't take it all in. Something to do with a binary system and its having been heated and ejected at high velocity, which stretched it into a longish noodle.

We need more deep-space observation stations, some with oodles of fuel, not for chasing but for positioning for flybys.

A biggie with a very powerful set of optical doo-hickeys orbiting outside the Oort Cloud would be a big plus.
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